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Cross, vb. 1) to lay athwart: “I have no one to blush with me, to c. their arms and hang their heads with mine,” Lucr. 793. “with your arms --ed,” LLL III, 19.
2) to sign with a cross: “I c. me for a sinner,” Err. II, 2, 190.
3) to come across a person's way, to meet, to face: “your precious self had then not --ed the eyes of my young play-fellow,” Wint. I, 2, 79. “send danger from the east unto the west, so honour c. it from the north to south,” H4A I, 3, 196. “what is thy name that in the battle thus thou --est me,” V, 3, 2. “what chance is this that suddenly hath --ed us?” H6A I, 4, 72. “I'll c. it, though it blast me,” Hml. I, 1, 127. -- Absolutely: “I am that way going to temptation, where prayers c.” Meas. II, 2, 159.*
4) to zigzag (cf. Adj.): “he cranks and --es with a thousand doubles,” Ven. 682. Transitively: “without any slips of prolixity or --ing the plain highway of talk,” Merch. III, 1, 13 (i. e. without deviating from the straight way).
5) to pass from side to side; a) absol.: “thence we have --ed, to execute the charge,” Wint. V, 1, 161. “was embarked to c. to Burgundy,” R3 I, 4, 10. -- b) trans.: “Leander --ed the Hellespont,” Gentl. I, 1, 22. “--ed the Severn,” Cymb. III, 5, 17. “the sea,” H6A III, 1, 180. IV, 1, 89. V, 5, 90. H6C II, 6, 97. III, 3, 235. R3 IV, 1, 42. Cymb. I, 6, 202. IV, 2, 334.
6) to thwart, to hinder: “to c. the curious workmanship of nature,” Ven. 734. “with some mischance c. Tarquin in his flight,” Lucr. 968. “the world is bent my deeds to c.” Sonn. 90, 2. Gentl. II, 6, 40. III, 1, 18. IV, 1, 12. V, 2, 55. Wiv. IV, 5, 130. V, 5, 40. Meas. IV, 2, 178. Ado I, 3, 70. II, 2, 3. II, 2, 3 LLL V, 2, 138. Mids. I, 1, 150. II, 1, 119. Merch. II, 4, 36. II, 5, 56. III, 1, 23. John III, 1, 91. H6A IV, 3, 52. H8 III, 2, 234. Rom. IV, 5, 95. V, 3, 20. Tim. I, 2, 166. III, 3, 29. Mcb. III, 1, 81. Cymb. III, 5, 168. V, 4, 101. -- Followed by from: “to c. me from the golden time I look for,” H6C III, 2, 127.
7) to cut short, to contradict: “both which so c. him with their opposite persuasion, that now he vows a league, and now invasion,” Lucr. 286. “I love not to be --ed,” LLL I, 2, 34. “we cannot c. the cause why we were born,” IV, 3, 218. “when did she c. thee with a bitter word?” Shr. II, 28. “I'll say so; who can c. it?” Per. IV, 3, 16. Shr. IV, 1, 75. IV, 3, 195. IV, 5, 10. H4A III, 1, 147. Caes. I, 2, 188. IV, 3, 150. Ant. I, 3, 9. Per. III Prol. 41.
8) to furnish with money? cf. “when all's spent, he'ld be --ed then, an he could,” Tim. I, 2, 168 (a quibble intended?).
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