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Catch, vb. (Impf. “caught:” LLL V, 2, 421. Merch. I, 1, 3. Wint. III, 1, 4. V, 2, 90. H4B III, 2, 194. Per. IV, 1, 88. “catched:” Cor. I, 3, 68. Partic. “caught:” Ven. 547. Wiv. III, 3, 45. Ado I, 1, 87. III, 1, 104. LLL V, 2, 69. As II, 7, 68 etc. “catched:” LLL V, 2, 69. All's I, 3, 176. Rom. IV, 5, 48).
1) to seize, to take, to capture, whether by pursuit or by stratagem; absolutely: which (greyhound) “runs himself and --es for his master,” Shr. V, 2, 53. “some dogs will c. well,” Tw. II, 3, 65. Transitively: “jealous of --ing,” Ven. 321 (i. e. fearing to be caught). “now quick desire hath caught the yielding prey,” Ven. 321 “the dove sleeps fast that this night-owl will c.” Lucr. 360. Sonn. 143, 1. Sonn. 143, 1 “for stale to c. these thieves,” Tp. IV, 187. “to c. a saint, with saints dost bait thy hook,” Meas. II, 2, 180. Wiv. III, 3, 45. LLL V, 2, 69. Ado III, 1, 104. Shr. II, 204. All's III, 6, 115. Wint. V, 2, 90. H4A III, 3, 43. H6B III, 3, 16. H6C V, 6, 17. Troil. IV, 4, 106. Cor. I, 3, 68. Hml. I, 3, 115. Oth. IV, 1, 46. Ant. II, 5, 15. V, 2, 350 etc. etc. Figuratively: “if the assassination could . . . c. with his surcease success,” Mcb. I, 7, 3.
2) to snatch: “thy wit is as quick as the greyhound's mouth, it --es,” Ado V, 2, 12. “c. this casket,” Merch. II, 6, 33.
3) to seize with the eye or by thought, to perceive: “nor his own vision holds what it doth c.” Sonn. 113, 8. “he had the dialect and different skill --ing all passions in his craft of will,” Compl. 126. “his eye begets occasion for his wit; for every object that the one doth c. the other turns to a mirthmoving jest,” LLL II, 70. “my fear hath --ed your fondness,” All's I, 3, 176. “has caught me in his eye,” Tim. IV, 3, 476. “Cleopatra, --ing but the least noise of this, dies instantly,” Ant. I, 2, 144 (cf. Ado V, 2, 12).
Intr., followed by at, == to guess: “you may be pleased to c. at mine intent by what did here befal me,” Ant. II, 2, 41.
4) to lay hold, to take: “the bushes in the way some c. her by the neck,” Ven. 872. “if I can c. him once upon the hip,” Merch. I, 3, 47. “to c. the strong fellow by the leg,” As I, 2, 223. “ready to c. each other by the throat,” R3 I, 3, 189. “till I have caught her once more in mine arms,” Hml. V, 1, 273. “I'll c. thine eyes,” Ant. V, 2, 156.
Followed by at (== to stretch out the hand for): “saucy lictors will c. at us, like strumpets,” Ant. V, 2, 215. And transitively in a similar sense: “that makes him gasp and stare and c. the air,” H6B III, 2, 371 (== gasp for breath).
5) Sometimes, indeed, scarcely differing from to take: “and cruel death hath --ed it from my side,” Rom. IV, 5, 48. “and am right glad to c. this good occasion,” H8 V, 1, 110. “thy nature is too full o'the milk of human kindness, to c. the nearest way,” Mcb. I, 5, 19. “consumption c. thee!” Tim. IV, 3, 201. “perdition c. my soul,” Oth. III, 3, 90. -- With up: “a blanket, in the alarum of fear caught up,” Hml. II, 2, 532.
6) to overtake: “cries to c. her,” Sonn. 143, 6. “sail so expeditious that shall c. your royal fleet far off,” Tp. V, 315. “the mild hind makes speed to c. the tiger,” Mids. II, 1, 233. “that our swift-winged souls may c. the king's,” R3 II, 2, 44. -- Nearly == to find, to surprise: “an a' may c. your hide and you alone,” John II, 136.
7) to attract, to charm: “I shall report, for most it caught me, the celestial habits,” Wint. III, 1, 4. “beauty and honour in her are so mingled that they have caught the king,” H8 II, 3, 77. “things in motion sooner c. the eye than what not stirs,” Troil. III, 3, 183.
8) to get possession of, to attain: “if thou c. thy hope,” Sonn. 143, 11. “have is have, however men do c.” John I, 173. “torment myself to c. the English crown,” H6C III, 2, 179. “thinkest thou to c. my life so pleasantly,” Troil. IV, 5, 249. cf. Wiv. III, 3, 45.
9) to get, to receive: “from yielders all things c.” Mids. III, 2, 30. our very petticoats will c. them (burrs) As I, 3, 15. “fight closer, or you'll c. a blow,” H6C III, 2, 23. “to c. my death,” Rom. II, 5, 53. “a noble nature may c. a wrench,” Tim. II, 2, 218. “you caught hurt in parting two that fought,” Per. IV, 1, 88.
Very often used of diseases: “he is sooner caught than the pestilence,” Ado I, 1, 87. Ado I, 1, 87 “how I caught it,” Merch. I, 1, 3. “all the evils that thou hast caught,” As II, 7, 68. “so quickly may one c. the plague,” Tw. I, 5, 314. “would send them back the plague, could I but c. it for them,” Tim. V, 1, 141. “to c. cold:” Gentl. I, 2, 136. Err. III, 1, 37. Ado III, 4, 66. Shr. IV, 1, 46. H4B III, 2, 194. Troil. IV, 2, 15. Lr. I, 4, 113. Cymb. I, 4, 180. With of before the person, by whom one is infected: “they have the plague, and caught it of your eyes,” LLL V, 2, 421. “it is caught of you,” Wint. I, 2, 386. “we c. of you,” H4B II, 4, 49. “wise bearing or ignorant carriage is caught, as men take diseases, one of another,” V, 1, 85.
Hence, without of, == to receive by contagion or infection: my ear should c. your voice etc. Mids. I, 1, 188. to c. them (the measles) Cor. III, 1, 80. Tim. IV, 3, 358.
Catching == contagious: “sickness is --ing,” Mids. I, 1, 186. H4A IV, 1, 30. H8 I, 3, 37. Cor. III, 1, 310. Caes. III, 1, 283.
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