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Chair, 1) a movable seat: John IV, 1, 5. R2 I, 3, 120. H4A II, 4, 415. H8 IV, 2, 3. Lr. III, 7, 34. Lr. III, 7, 34 “a barber's c. that fits all buttocks,” All's II, 2, 17. “sitting in a lower c.” Meas II, 1, 132 (one designed for the ease of sick people). “sit and pant in your great --s of ease,” Tim. V, 4, 11. Symbol of the repose becoming old age: “run a tilt at death within a c.” H6A III, 2, 51. “when sapless age . . . should bring thy father to his drooping c.” IV, 5, 5.
2) a seat of public authority: “the several --s of order,” Wiv. V, 5, 65 (in St. George's chapel at Windsor). “his dukedom and his c. with me is left,” H6C II, 1, 90. “for c. and dukedom, throne and kingdom say,” H6C II, 1, 90 “sat down in a rich c. of state,” H8 IV, 1, 67 (a raised chair, with a canopy over it). “behold that c. stand empty,” V, 3, 10. “the --s of justice,” Cor. III, 3, 34. “power, unto itself most commendable, hath not a tomb so evident as a c. to extol what it hath done,” IV, 7, 52 (i. e. self-applause is most fatal in public functions).* “the praetor's c.” Caes. I, 3, 143. “let him go up into the public c.” III, 2, 68 (the Roman rostra). Frequently == the throne: “dost thou so hunger for mine empty c.?” H4B IV, 5, 95. H6B I, 2, 38. H6C I, 1, 51. H6C I, 1, 51 I, 4, 97. II, 6, 20. V, 5, 19. R3 IV, 4, 470. V, 3, 251. Ant. III, 6, 4.
3) a sedan: Oth. V, 1, 82. Oth. V, 1, 82
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