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Change, vb., I) trans. 1) to alter: “if all these petty ills shall c. thy good,” Lucr. 656. “to c. their kinds,” Lucr. 656 “c. decrees of kings,” Sonn. 115, 6. “the fashion of the time is --d,” Gentl. III, 1, 86. Wiv. III, 5, 69. Meas. I, 2, 110. I, 3, 54. I, 4, 47. V, 389. Err. I, 2, 99. II, 2, 154. V, 297. Mids. II, 1, 230. Merch. I, 1, 76. As II, 1, 18 etc. “to c. colour:” Gentl. II, 4, 23. As III, 2, 192. Wint. V, 2, 98. R3 III, 5, 1. “nor c. my countenance,” H6B III, 1, 99. “to c. one's mind:” Gentl. III, 2, 59. V, 4, 109. Ado III, 2, 119. “my mind is --d,” R3 IV, 4, 456. “c. thy thought, that I may c. my mind,” Sonn. 10, 9. “you must c. this purpose, or I my life,” Wint. IV, 4, 39. -- Used reflectively: “all things c. them to the contrary,” Rom. IV, 5, 90. -- Sometimes == to transform: “new created the creatures that were mine, or --d them,” Tp. I, 2, 82. “O Bottom, thou art --d,” Mids. III, 1, 117. “as if with Circe she would c. my shape,” H6A V, 3, 36. “O that I knew this husband which must c. his horns with garlands,” Ant. I, 2, 5 (== make of another appearance; most M. Edd. charge). cf. Cor. V, 3, 152, where likewise M. Edd. charge. -- == to make to be of another mind or disposition: “nor I to none alive, that my steeled sense or --es right or wrong,” Sonn. 112, 8. “to c. this currish Jew,” Merch. IV, 1, 292. “I am --d: I'll go sell all my land,” Oth. I, 3, 388.
Followed by to: the state government was --d from kings to consuls, Lucr. Arg. Oth. I, 3, 388 “her blue blood --d to black,” Lucr. 1454. “to c. your day of youth to sullied night,” Sonn. 15, 12. “sorrow --d to solace,” Pilgr. 203. “c. you to a milder form,” Gentl. V, 4, 56. Err. II, 2, 201. Ado IV, 1, 213. H6A V, 3, 36. H6B III, 1, 332. R3 I, 1, 7. Caes. I, 3, 66. Followed by into: “Tranio is --d into Lucentio,” Shr. I, 1, 242. “their thimbles into armed gauntlets c.” John V, 2, 156.
2) to put one thing in the place of another: “to c. habits,” LLL V, 2, 542. “'tis a good shilling, or I will c. it,” H5 IV, 8, 77. “ere the six years can c. their moons,” R2 I, 3, 220.
3) to exchange: “they have --d eyes,” Tp. I, 2, 441. “c. your favours,” LLL V, 2, 134. LLL V, 2, 134 LLL V, 2, 134 “the spring, the summer, autumn . . . c. their wonted liveries,” Mids. II, 1, 112. “would not c. that calling to be adopted heir to Frederick,” As I, 2, 245. “wilt thou c. fathers?” I, 3, 93. “as we c. our courtesies,” All's III, 2, 100. “the lark and toad c. eyes,” Rom. III, 5, 31. -- Having with before the person with whom the exchange is made: “I scorn to c. my state with kings,” Sonn. 29, 14. “--ing place with that which goes before,” 60, 3. 128, 9. Meas. V, 339. LLL V, 2, 238. R2 III, 2, 189. H4A I, 3, 101. H5 III, 7, 12. Hml. I, 2, 163. Oth. I, 3, 317. -- Having for before the person or thing received in exchange: “my gravity could I c. for an idle plume,” Meas. II, 4, 11. Err. III, 1, 47. LLL V, 2, 844. Mids. II, 2, 114. As III, 2, 301. Shr. III, 1, 81. Wint. I, 2, 68. H6A I, 1, 151. H6B I, 1, 219. Troil. IV, 2, 96. Oth. II, 1, 156. IV, 3, 98.
II) intr. to be altered: “by chance or nature's --ing course untrimmed,” Sonn. 18, 8. “the sky --s when they are wives,” As IV, 1, 149. “I hope my holy humour will c.” R3 I, 4, 121. “their minds may c.” Caes. II, 2, 96. “that things might c. or cease,” Lr. III, 1, 7 (== suffer a complete revolution). “the Moor already --s with my poison,” Oth. III, 3, 325. Used of the moon: Tp. II, 1, 184. LLL V, 2, 212. LLL V, 2, 212 Mids. V, 256. Shr. IV, 5, 20. H5 V, 2, 173. Rom. II, 2, 110.
== to be inconstant: “no, time, thou shalt not boast that I do c.” Sonn. 123, 1. “his --ing thoughts,” Gentl. IV, 4, 124. it (his faith) “ever --s,” Ado I, 1, 76. “if my passion c. not shortly,” Ado I, 1, 76 Hortensio will be quit with thee by --ing (== by loving another) Shr. III, 1, 92. “wind-changing Warwick now can c. no more,” H6C V, 1, 57. “shallow --ing woman,” R3 IV, 4, 431. “go, wind, to wind, there turn and c. together,” Troil. V, 3, 110. “give that --ing piece to him,” Tit. I, 309. “think what a chance thou --st on,” Cymb. I, 5, 68.
== to change colour or countenance: “he --s more and more,” Ado V, 1, 140. “his eye is hollow, and he --s much,” H4B IV, 5, 6. “how they c.! their cheeks are paper,” H5 II, 2, 73. “he smiles, and Caesar doth not c.” Caes. III, 1, 24. “thou --d and self-covered thing, bemonster not thy feature,” Lr. IV, 2, 62. “c. you, madam?” Cymb. I, 6, 12.
Followed by to: “faith itself to hollow falsehood c.” John III, 1, 95. “our solemn hymns to sullen dirges c.” Rom. IV, 5, 88. Followed by into: “he --d almost into another man,” All's IV, 3, 5. Followed by for: “she must c. for youth,” Oth. I, 3, 356. “thou holdest a place for which the pained'st fiend of hell would not in reputation c.” Per. IV, 6, 174.
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