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Devil, in O. Edd. Divel (ordinarily monosyll., but sometimes dissyll., f. i. Tp. IV, 188. Wiv. I, 3, 61. Mids. V, 9. Tw. I, 5, 270. H8 II, 1, 21) fiend; “the d.:” Tp. I, 2, 319. III, 2, 89. V, 129. Meas. II, 4, 16. V, 29. V, 29 Err. IV, 3, 50. IV, 4, 131. H4A I, 2, 131 etc. “a d.:” Sonn. 144, 7. Tp. III, 2, 138. IV, 188. Meas. III, 1, 92. Err. IV, 2, 33. LLL V, 2, 106. Shr. III, 2, 158. H6B I, 2, 92 etc. “this d.” Lucr. 85. “some d.” John III, 2, 2. “what d.” Wiv. III, 3, 230 etc. “--s:” Tp. I, 2, 215. II, 2, 59. II, 2, 59 III, 3, 36. Wiv. I, 3, 61. II, 2, 312. Err. IV, 3, 72. LLL IV, 3, 257. Mids. V, 9 etc. “the d. and his dam,” Wiv. I, 1, 151. Err. IV, 3, 51. Shr. III, 2, 158. H6A I, 5, 5. Oth. IV, 1, 153 etc. (cf. Dam). “in the --'s name,” H4A III, 1, 69. “with the --'s name,” Wiv. II, 1, 24. Used as a feminine: Wint. I, 2, 82. John III, 1, 196. Cymb. II, 1, 57. Proverbial phrases: “he must have a long spoon that must eat with the d.” Err. IV, 3, 65. “give the d. his due,” H4A I, 2, 132. H5 III, 7, 127. “he must needs go that the d. drives,” All's I, 3, 32. “the d. rides upon a fiddlestick,” H4A II, 4, 534 (cf. “the d. fiddle them,” H8 I, 3, 42). “be mad, cry: the d.” Err. IV, 4, 131. “tell truth and shame the d.” H4A III, 1, 62. “the d. can cite Scripture,” Merch. I, 3, 99. “as good a gentleman as the d.” H5 IV, 7, 145; cf. Lr. III, 4, 148. “more haughty than the d.” H6A I, 3, 85; cf. Tw. I, 5, 270. -- Used for any great evil: “d. Envy,” Troil. II, 3, 23. “the d. Luxury,” V, 2, 55. “the d. drunkenness,” Oth. II, 3, 297. “the d. wrath,” Oth. II, 3, 297 -- Noting extraordinary skill or boldness: “set spurs and away, like three German --s,” Wiv. IV, 5, 70. “the finest mad d. of jealousy,” V, 1, 19. “thou most excellent d. of wit,” Tw. II, 5, 226. “he is a d. in a private brawl,” Tw. III, 4, 259. “he's a very d.” Tw. III, 4, 259 “I have persuaded him the youth's a d.” Tw. III, 4, 259 “one that will play the d. with you,” John II, 135. “he will foin like any d.” H4B II, 1, 18. “fight like --s,” H5 III, 7, 162. “he's the d.” Cor. I, 10, 16. -- Serving as an expletive to express wonder or vexation: “what the d. should move me . . .,” All's IV, 1, 37. “what the d. art thou?” John II, 134. “what the d. hast thou brought here?” H4B II, 4, 1. “what a d. hast thou to do with the time of the day?” H4A I, 2, 6. “what a d. dost thou in Warwickshire?” IV, 2, 56. “where the d. should he learn our language?” Tp. II, 2, 69. Rom. II, 4, 1. “why the d. should we keep knives,” H5 II, 1, 95. “why the d. took he upon him . . .,” H8 I, 1, 72. Rom. III, 1, 107. -- Used as a ludicrous negative: “the d. a puritan that he is, or any thing constantly, but a timepleaser,” Tw. II, 3, 159.
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