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Devise, 1) trans. to contrive, to excogitate, to invent: “danger --th shifts,” Ven. 690. Lucr. 969. Sonn. 83, 14. Gentl. III, 1, 38. Wiv. IV, 2, 75. Ado IV, 1, 281. V, 4, 130. LLL I, 1, 124. LLL I, 1, 124 I, 2, 66. IV, 3, 372. Merch. I, 2, 19. Merch. I, 2, 19 As I, 2, 25. I, 3, 137. III, 2, 158. IV, 3, 182. Wint. IV, 4, 451. John III, 1, 149. John III, 1, 149 R2 I, 1, 77. II, 1, 249. III, 4, 1. IV, 330. H4B V, 1, 87. V, 3, 139. H5 I, 2, 55. H6A III, 1, 2. III, 3, 17. H6B III, 1, 59. H6B III, 1, 59 IV, 8, 71. H6C II, 6, 71. IV, 1, 35. R3 II, 2, 22. V, 3, 306. V, 3, 306 H8 I, 2, 51. Troil. III, 2, 86. Cor. II, 2, 128. Tit. V, 1, 128. Rom. II, 4, 191. V, 3, 240. Tim. I, 2, 15. Caes. III, 1, 246. Hml. IV, 7, 70. V, 2, 32. Lr. V, 1, 64. Oth. III, 1, 39. IV, 2, 221. which “is more than history can pattern, though --d and played to take spectators,” Wint. III, 2, 37, i. e. adorned by poetical fiction. == to lie, to forge: “d. some virtuous lie,” Sonn. 72, 5. “--ing impossible slanders,” Ado II, 1, 143. III, 1, 84. H4A III, 2, 23. Oth. III, 4, 12. IV, 2, 133.
Followed by an inf. or a clause: “when they have --d what strained touches rhetoric can lend,” Sonn. 82, 9. “d. how you'll use him, and let us two d. to bring him thither,” Wiv. IV, 4, 27. Ado II, 1, 274. Mids. I, 1, 213. III, 2, 35. As I, 3, 102. Cor. IV, 1, 38. Rom. III, 1, 72.
2) intr. to invent, to lay schemes: “d., wit; write, pen,” LLL I, 2, 190. or my reporter --d well for her (== fabled), Ant. II, 2, 194. “then she plots, then she ruminates, then she --s,” Wiv. II, 2, 321. “for his safety there I'll best d.” H6A I, 1, 172. == to think, to ponder: “the other instruments did see and hear, d., instruct, walk, feel,” Cor. I, 1, 105. Followed by on: “where are you? what d. you on?” H6A I, 2, 124.
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