previous next
Disgrace, vb. 1) to put out of favour: “your grace is welcome to a man --d,” Gentl. V, 4, 123. “--d me in my happy victories,” H4A IV, 3, 97. R3 I, 3, 79.
2) to dishonour: Ven. 412. Lucr. 718. Lucr. 718 Gentl. III, 1, 29. Wiv. IV, 4, 16. Ado III, 2, 130. IV, 2, 56. V, 1, 245. Merch. III, 1, 56. As II, 4, 4. R2 I, 1, 170. H6A I, 5, 8. III, 1, 99. III, 4, 29. V, 5, 48. H6C IV, 3, 32. R3 IV, 4, 371. Tim. III, 3, 13. so --d a part (== disgraceful) Wint. I, 2, 188.
3) to discredit, to baffle, to lower in estimation: “right perfection wrongfully -- d,” Sonn. 66, 7. “thou canst not d. me half so ill, as I'll myself d.” 89, 5. 89, 5 “that her skill may time d. and wretched minutes kill,” 126, 8. “words are very rascals since bonds --d them,” Tw. III, 1, 25. “who came off bravely, who --d,” H5 III, 6, 77. we shall much d. the name of Agincourt, IV Chor. H5 III, 6, 77 “let it not d. me, if I demand . . .,” V, 2, 31. “if the trial of the law o'ertake ye, you'll part away --d,” H8 III, 1, 97.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: