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Disperse, 1) to scatter, to drive asunder: “in troops I have --d them 'bout the isle,” Tp. I, 2, 220. “the fleet which I --d,” Tp. I, 2, 220 R2 II, 3, 27. III, 2, 74. III, 3, 2. H4B IV, 2, 102. H6B IV, 9, 34. R3 IV, 4, 523. Joined with scatter: “our soldiers, scattered and --ed,” H6A II, 1, 76. R3 IV, 4, 513. Tit. V, 2, 78. Reflectively: “we will d. ourselves,” R2 II, 4, 4. H6B V, 1, 45. Caes. II, 1, 222.
2) to dissipate, to make to vanish: “thy sea within a puddle's womb is hearsed, and not the puddle in thy sea --d,” Lucr. 658. “--d those vapours,” Err. I, 1, 90. “--d are the glories,” H6A I, 2, 137. H6C V, 3, 10. H8 III, 1, 2.
3) to spread: “every alien pen hath got my use and under thee their poesy d.” Sonn. 78, 4. those tongues that durst d. it (the rumour) H8 II, 1, 153. “poison such as will d. itself through all the veins,” Rom. V, 1, 61. “the --d air,” Lucr. 1805 (== spreading everywhere).
4) intr. a) to be scattered, to separate: “away, d.” Wiv. V, 5, 78. b) to vanish: “a circle in the water, which never ceaseth to enlarge itself, till by broad spreading it d. to nought,” H6A I, 2, 135.
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