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Dare, vb. (3d person dare and dares indiscriminately, but in the sense to challenge or defy dares only. Preterit durst, but only in the first two significations. Partic. dared, == ventured: Meas. II, 2, 91. Wint. III, 2, 130. R2 II, 3, 91. R2 II, 3, 91 R2 II, 3, 91. == defied: H6A I, 3, 45. Rom. II, 4, 12. Hml. I, 1, 84. Ant. III, 7, 31).
1) to have courage, to be bold enough, to venture; a) usually followed by an inf. without “to:” Ven. 401. Lucr. 458. Lucr. 458 Lucr. 458 Sonn. 57, 5. 131, 7. Pilgr. 196. Tp. I, 2, 470. III, 1, 77. III, 2, 62. Gentl. I, 2, 42. II, 3, 63. V, 4, 162. Wiv. II, 1, 25. II, 2, 253. Meas. III, 1, 77. IV, 3, 160. V, 316. Err. I, 2, 60. IV, 1, 75. V, 31. Ado III, 1, 74. III, 2, 12. IV, 1, 300. LLL I, 1, 229. IV, 3, 227. IV, 3, 227 Mids. III, 1, 136. III, 2, 336. III, 2, 336 V, 253. Merch. II, 4, 36. III, 1, 47. Tw. III, 4, 347. Wint. II, 2, 37. V, 2, 184. John I, 271. III, 1, 132. H4A III, 3, 163. H5 III, 7, 156. H6A I, 2, 89. I, 3, 44. II, 4, 2. II, 4, 2 III, 4, 31. H6B I, 1, 229. II, 1, 39. II, 1, 39 III, 2, 201. IV, 8, 4. V, 1, 95. H6C III, 3, 178. R3 IV, 2, 70. H8 II, 1, 72. V, 3, 50. Troil. I, 3, 271. V, 2, 94. Tit. II, 1, 59. Rom. II, 4, 12. Mcb. I, 7, 46. Mcb. I, 7, 46 IV, 3, 33. V, 3, 28. Hml. I, 1, 161 (Ff can). III, 4, 39 etc. “Durst:” Lucr. 1223. Tp. I, 2, 140. Ado V, 4, 89. LLL IV, 3, 346. Mids. II, 2, 76. III, 2, 69. As V, 4, 89. Shr. IV, 1, 166. All's V, 3, 46. Wint. II, 2, 50. R2 I, 1, 66. H4A I, 3, 116. V, 1, 63. H6A I, 1, 123. I, 4, 48. II, 4, 87. H6B IV, 10, 4. H6C I, 1, 63. II, 2, 108. IV, 1, 112. V, 2, 22. H8 I, 1, 33. Tit. IV, 1, 62. Mcb. I, 7, 49. Per. I, 2, 54 etc.
b) followed by an inf. with to: “then may I d. to boast how I do love thee,” Sonn. 26, 13. “he --s to tread,” Wiv. IV, 4, 59. “had not --d to do that evil,” Meas. II, 2, 91. H5 II, 2, 81. H6B IV, 1, 80. V, 1, 22. Cymb. III, 3, 34. “I durst to wager she is honest,” Oth. IV, 2, 12 (“I durst wager,” Per. V, 1, 42). -- To before a second inf.: “--s better be damned than to do it,” All's III, 6, 96.
c) followed by an accus.: “the roe which no encounter d.” Ven. 676. “my heart . . . not --ing the reports of my tongue,” All's IV, 1, 34 (i. e. not --ing to perform what the tongue speaks). “what --s not Warwick,” H6B III, 2, 203. “he that --s most,” H8 V, 3, 131. “what man d., I d.” Mcb. III, 4, 99. Cor. IV, 5, 99.
d) absolutely: “how he --s, being --d,” Rom. II, 4, 12.
2) may; and negatively, must not: “we d. trust you in this kind,” Gentl. III, 2, 56. “my robe . . . is all I d. now call my own,” H8 III, 2, 455. “what I d. too well do, I d. not do,” All's II, 3, 210 (i. e. what I am bold enough to do, I must not, it is not well for me, to do). “durst inhabit on a living brow,” Sonn. 68, 4. “I durst have denied that,” Err. II, 2, 67. “how they might hurt their enemies, if they durst,” Ado V, 1, 98. “she durst not lie near this lack-love,” Mids. II, 2, 76. “my face so thin that in mine ear I durst not stick a rose lest men should say . . .,” John I, 142. “I durst so far free him,” Cor. IV, 7, 47. “durst I have done my will,” Caes. V, 3, 48. -- “I d. say:” H5 IV, 1, 129. H6A II, 4, 133. “I d. not say:” Gentl. V, 4, 65. “I d. assure you:” Shr. IV, 3, 191. Caes. V, 4, 21. “I d. vouch:” Cor. III, 1, 300
Passing, as may also does, into the sense of will and can; a) of will: “I d. be bound again, my soul upon the forfeit, that your lord will never more break faith,” Merch. V, 251. “and --s better be damned than to do it,” All's III, 6, 96 (== would rather). “I d. lay any money 'twill be nothing yet,” Tw. III, 4, 432. “let Titan rise as early as he d.” Troil. V, 10, 25. “death do what he d.” Rom. II, 6, 7. “Surrey durst better have burnt that tongue than said so,” H8 III, 2, 253. “I love you and durst commend a secret to your ear,” V, 1, 17. “I durst wager,” Per. V, 1, 42. -- b) Of can: “although the king have mercies more than I d. make faults,” H8 II, 1, 71. “more miseries than my weak-hearted enemies d. offer,” III, 2, 390. “exposing what is mortal and unsure to all that fortune, death and danger d.” Hml. IV, 4, 52 (== may or can do).
3) to challenge, to defy: “am I --d and bearded to my face,” H6A I, 3, 45. “if false Suffolk d. him,” H6B III, 2, 203. “--ing the event to the teeth,” H8 I, 2, 36. “but d. all imminence,” Troil. V, 10, 13. “how he --s, being --d,” Rom. II, 4, 12. “do you d. our anger?” Tim. III, 5, 96. “to d. the vile contagion of the night,” Caes. II, 1, 265. “I d. damnation,” Hml. IV, 5, 133. Followed by to: “I dare thee but to breathe upon my love,” Gentl. V, 4, 131. “and --s him to set forward,” R2 I, 3, 109. “I d. him to lay his gay comparisons apart,” Ant. III, 13, 25. “unless a brother should a brother d. to gentle exercise,” H4A V, 2, 54. “I d. your quenchless fury to more rage,” H6C I, 4, 28. “--ing an opposite to every danger,” R3 V, 4, 3. “d. me to the desert,” Mcb. III, 4, 104. “was by Fortinbras --d to the combat,” Hml. I, 1, 84. “he --s us to't,” Ant. III, 7, 30. “--d him to single fight,” Ant. III, 7, 30 “--s me to personal combat,” IV, 1, 3. “I d. you to this match,” Cymb. I, 4, 157. -- To d. on: “he goes before me and still --s me on,” Mids. III, 2, 413.
Singular passages: “their neighing coursers --ing of the spur,” H4B IV, 1, 119 (probably == their coursers, by neighing, challenging the spur to give the signal of setting off. cf. Of, concerning the use of this preposition after participles). “how might she tongue me! yet reason --s her no,” Meas. IV, 4, 28 (perhaps == reason defies her denial of my assertions).
4) to amaze, to make couch down in fear (used of birds caught by means of small mirrors fastened on scarlet cloth, or by keeping a hawk hovering aloft): “let his grace . . . d. us with his cap like larks,” H8 III, 2, 282. “our approach shall so much d. the field that England shall couch down in fear and yield,” H5 IV, 2, 36.
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