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Draw (impf. drew, partic. drawn). 1) to pull along, to cause to move by force applied in advance of the thing moved; absol.: “to follow as it --s,” Meas. II, 4, 177. “this advantage, this vile --ing bias,” John II, 577. “we d. together,” Troil. V, 5, 44 (== we are yoked together, have the same work in hand). “every bearded fellow that's but yoked may d. with you,” Oth. IV, 1, 68 (== is in the same case). Trans.: “two doves will d. me through the sky,” Ven. 153. Tw. II, 5, 70. H5 III Chor. H5 III Chor. Lr. I, 4, 244. II, 4, 75. “I have followed it, or it hath --n me rather,” Tp. I, 2, 394. Meas. III, 2, 289. Mids. II, 1, 195. Merch. V, 68. Merch. V, 68 Tw. II, 3, 61. H4B II, 4, 313. Troil. I, 3, 14. Ant. II, 5, 13. IV, 15, 13. IV, 15, 13 “and back the same grief d.” Lucr. 1673. “from the purple fountain Brutus drew the knife,” Lucr. 1673 Compl. 36. Merch. IV, 1, 428. “to d. a tooth,” Ado III, 2, 22. “to d. a bow:” Shr. V, 2, 47. H4B III, 2, 48. Lr. I, 1, 145. “d. your arrows to the head,” R3 V, 3, 339; and absol.: “look ye d. home enough,” Tit. IV, 3, 3. “now d.” Tit. IV, 3, 3 “d. me a clothiers' yard,” Lr. IV, 6, 88. cf. “I will bid thee d., as we do the minstrels; d., to pleasure us,” Ado V, 1, 128 (i. e. d. the bow of thy fiddle). “to d. a sword:” Lucr. 626. Tp. II, 1, 292. Err. V, 151. Ado V, 1, 125. Mids. III, 1, 11. H6A III, 4, 39. H6B IV, 1, 92. “a dagger,” Mids. V, 150. “weapons,” Tp. II, 1, 320. Tp. II, 1, 320 H6B III, 2, 237. “d. thy tool,” Rom. I, 1, 37. to d. out == to d.: H5 IV, 2, 22. “d. forth thy weapon,” Shr. III, 2, 238. “to d. the sword on a person:” Err. V, 262. Tw. V, 191. Rom. III, 1, 9. And absol.: “d. together,” Tp. II, 1, 294. Tw. V, 69. H4B II, 1, 50. H6A I, 3, 46. Rom. I, 1, 69. Lr. II, 1, 32. II, 2, 33 etc. “to d. on a p.:” Err. V, 43. Rom. V, 3, 284. Lr. II, 2, 131. Cymb. I, 1, 160 etc. why are you drawn? (== why have you drawn your sword?) Tp. II, 1, 308. “--n and ready,” Mids. III, 2, 402. H5 II, 1, 39 (O. Edd. hewn). Rom. I, 1, 73. -- to d. the curtain, == a) to pull it before sth., in order to hide it: Merch. II, 7, 78. II, 9, 84. Wint. V, 3, 59. H6B III, 3, 32. H8 V, 2, 34. Oth. V, 2, 104. b) to open it, in order to discover sth.: Lucr. 371. Lucr. 371 Merch. II, 9, 1. Tw. I, 5, 251. H4A IV, 1, 73. H4B I, 1, 72. Troil. III, 2, 49. “to d. aside the curtains,” Merch. II, 7, 1. -- “to d. lots:” Ant. II, 3, 35. Per. I, 4, 46. “we'll d. cuts for the senior,” Err. V, 422. “four shall quickly d. out my command,” Cor. I, 6, 84. Hence == to win, to get: I would not d. them (viz the six thousand ducats): “I would have my bond,” Merch. IV, 1, 87 (or == take from the table?). “the rich stake --n,” Wint. I, 2 Wint. I, 2 “all the world of wealth I have --n together,” H8 III, 2, 211. “that, swoopstake, you will d. both friend and foe,” Hml. IV, 5, 142. “what can you say to d. a third more opulent,” Lr. I, 1, 87. “and must d. me that which my father loses,” III, 3, 24. “to apprehend thus, --s us a profit from all things we see,” Cymb. III, 3, 18. -- to d. apart (== to take aside) Oth. II, 3, 391. “to d. Don Pedro and the Count Claudio alone,” Ado II, 2, 33. “when I had it, drew myself apart,” Tit. V, 1, 112. “d. them to Tiber banks,” Caes. I, 1, 63. “he --s Mark Antony out of the way,” III, 1, 26. “to d. the brats of Clarence out of sight,” R3 III, 5, 107 (== to withdraw them from the eyes of the public). cf. “hath --n him and the rest from their sport,” Wiv. IV, 2, 34. Err. I, 1, 44. V, 56. Followed by from, in a tropical sense, == to elicit: “to utter that which else no worldly good should d. from me,” Gentl. III, 1, 9. Gentl. III, 1, 9 “d. a belief from you,” As V, 2, 63. “until you had --n oaths from him,” Wint. I, 2, 29. “to d. my answer from thy articles,” John II, 111 (i. e. to make me answer according to thy articles). “tears --n from her eyes by your foul wrongs,” R2 III, 1, 15. “you do d. my spirits from me with new lamenting ancient oversights,” H4B II, 3, 46. “drewest rivers from his eyes,” R3 I, 3, 176. “your silence from my weakness --s my very soul of counsel,” Troil. III, 2, 140. “his insolence --s folly from my lips,” IV, 5, 258. “to d. from her a prayer of earnest heart,” Oth. I, 3, 152. “nor from mine own weak merits will I d. the smallest fear,” Oth. III, 3, 187 (== derive, deduce). “from whose so many weights of baseness cannot a dram of worth be drawn,” Cymb. III, 5, 89. to d. forth from == to turn off, divert from: “to d. forth your noble ancestry from the corruption of abusing times unto a lineal course,” R3 III, 7, 198. cf. “when holy men are at their beads, 'tis hard to d. them hence,” R3 III, 7, 93. “poverty could never d. 'em from me,” H8 IV, 2, 149. to d. to sth. == to move, to incite, to induce: “how many actions most ridiculous hast thou been --n to by thy fantasy?” As II, 4, 31. so much (love) “as might have --n one to a longer voyage,” Tw. III, 3, 7. “such noble scenes as d. the eye to flow,” Tw. III, 3, 7. “if that thy artificial feat can d. him but to answer thee in aught,” Per. V, 1, 73. cf. “and d. you into madness,” Hml. I, 4, 74. “how hardly I was --n into this war,” Ant. V, 1, 74. “d. our throne into a sheep-cote,” Wint. IV, 4, 808. “profit again should hardly d. me here,” Mcb. V, 3, 62. And with on: “shall d. him on to this confusion,” Mcb. III, 5, 29. “to d. him on to pleasures,” Hml. II, 2, 15. to d. on == to bring on, to cause: “d. not on thy danger,” H6C III, 3, 75. “whose voice will d. on more,” Hml. V, 2, 403. “death --n on with torture,” Cymb. IV, 4, 14. == to d. within the compass of suspect == to make suspected: Err. III, 1, 87. cf. “to d. me in these vile suspects,” R3 I, 3, 89. to d. out == to spin out, to lengthen: “my laments would be --n out too long,” Lucr. 1616. “thy unkindness shall his death d. out to lingering sufferance,” Meas. II, 4, 166. “he --eth out the thread of his verbosity,” LLL V, 1, 18. “to eke it and to d. it out in length,” Merch. III, 2, 23. “rough uneven ways --s out our miles,” R2 II, 3, 5. “'tis but the time and --ing days out that we stand upon,” Caes. III, 1, 100. “a man may d. his heart out, ere 'a pluck one,” All's I, 3, 93 (perhaps quibbling: may pluck his heart out, and: may spend his life). to d., simply, == to draw out, to lengthen: “the hand of time shall d. this brief into as huge a volume,” John II, 103. “how long her face is --n,” H8 IV, 2, 97. -- to d. breath == to breathe: “any that --s breath in Italy,” Merch. III, 2, 298. “cheerly --ing breath,” R2 I, 3, 66. “--s the sweet infant breath of gentle sleep,” R2 I, 3, 66 “that no man might d. short breath to-day,” H4A V, 2, 49. “d. thy breath in pain, to tell my story,” Hml. V, 2, 359. “so she at these sad signs --s up her breath,” Ven. 929 (== draws a deep breath). -- to d. == to drag to the place of execution (used in quibbles only): they (tapsters) “will d. you, and you will hang them,” Meas. II, 1, 215. “I have the toothache. Draw it! hang it!” Ado III, 2, 22. “--n in the flattering table of her eye, hanged in the frowning wrinkle of her brow,” John II, 504.
2) to suck, to drink up: “she will d. his lips' rich treasure dry,” Ven. 552. “well --n, monster!” Tp. II, 2, 151. “a lioness with udders all --n dry,” As IV, 3, 115 (cf. Cub-drawn). “from my dugs he drew not this deceit,” R3 II, 2, 30. Applied to the sun: “there the sun shall greet them and d. their honours reeking up to heaven,” H5 IV, 3, 101. “O blessed sun, d. from the earth rotten humidity,” Tim. IV, 3, 1. “fogs --n by the powerful sun,” Lr. II, 4, 169. to d. in: “thy conceit is soaking, will d. in more than the common blocks,” Wint. I, 2, 224. “I d. in many a tear,” H6C IV, 4, 21.
3) to tap, to broach: “he shall d., he shall tap,” Wiv. I, 3, 11. they (tapsters) “will d. you,” Meas. II, 1, 215. “the wine of life is --n, and the mere lees is left this vault to brag of,” Mcb. II, 3, 100. cf. “I never come into any room in a taphouse, but I am --n in,” Meas. II, 1, 220 (quibbling == I am bled in it, I am swindled out of my money). Followed by of: “the purse too light, being --n of heaviness,” Cymb. V, 4, 168 (== emptied of). to d. blood == to spill blood: where it (the knife) “--s blood,” Hml. IV, 7, 144. Followed by from: “for every bloody drop was --n from him,” H6A II, 2, 8. “one drop of blood --n from thy country's bosom,” III, 3, 54. “drew blood from thee,” IV, 6, 16. IV, 6, 16 Followed by on: “blood will I d. on thee,” H6A I, 5, 6. “some blood --n on me,” Lr. II, 1, 35. By “out of:” Cor. IV, 5, 105.
4) Used of military affairs, a) to assemble, to levy: “d. our puissance together,” John III, 1, 339. “that such an army could be --n in France,” IV, 2, 118. “before I drew this gallant head of war,” V, 2, 113. H4A III, 1, 89. IV, 1, 33. IV, 1, 33 IV, 4, 28. H4B I, 3, 76. H4B I, 3, 76 Cymb. III, 5, 25. And in general == to assemble: “a good quarrel to d. emulous factions,” Troil. II, 3, 79. “when you have --n your number,” Cor. II, 3, 261. “there were --n upon a heap a hundred ghastly women,” Caes. I, 3, 22. -- b) to range in battle, to array: “Troy before the which is --n the power of Greece,” Lucr. 1368. “my foreward shall be --n in length,” R3 V, 3, 293 (Q1 be --n out all in length). With up: “d. up your powers,” Lr. V, 1, 51.
5) to withdraw: “d. the action,” H4B II, 1, 162. “wilt thou d. thy forces hence,” H6C V, 1, 25. “the Roman legions, all from Gallia --n,” Cymb. IV, 3, 24 (or == assembled?). “I was fain to d. mine honour in,” H8 V, 4, 60 (== to retreat into the house).
6) to mark with lines, or to represent by a picture, to paint: “which the conceited painter drew so proud,” Lucr. 1371. Lucr. 1371 Sonn. 16, 4. 19, 10. 24, 10. 98, 12. Ado III, 1, 63. LLL V, 2, 38. Shr. Ind. 2, 62. All's I, 1, 104. John II, 503. V, 7, 32. H4B I, 3, 42. V, 2, 13. Tim. V, 1, 83. Caes. II, 1, 232. Hml. II, 1, 91. “the lines of my body are as well --n as his,” Cymb. IV, 1, 10. drawn in little == reduced to a smaller shape, formed in miniature: “on his visage was in little --n what largeness thinks in Paradise was sawn,” Compl. 90. “if all the devils of hell be --n in little and Legion itself possessed him,” Tw. III, 4, 94.
7) to write down, to sketch, to chalk out: “I will d. a bill of properties,” Mids. I, 2, 107. “d. a deed of gift,” Merch. IV, 1, 394. “let specialties be --n,” Shr. II, 127. “there it is in writing, fairly --n,” III, 1, 70. H4A III, 1, 80. H4A III, 1, 80 H6A V, 1, 38. H6C III, 3, 135. R3 V, 3, 24. H8 I, 1, 169. Cymb. I, 4, 155.
8) As a hunting term, == to trace, to track: “a hound that runs counter and yet --s dry-foot well,” Err. IV, 2, 39. “no more truth in thee than in a --n fox,” H4A III, 3, 129 (i. e. a fox scented and driven from cover; such a one being supposed to be full of tricks).
9) to move, to advance, to approach: “a reverend man . . . towards this afflicted fancy drew,” Compl. 61. “how near the god drew to the complexion of a goose,” Wiv. V, 5, 8. “nature to her bias drew in that,” Tw. V, 267 (or == pulled, attracted?). “it --s towards supper,” John I, 204. “it now --s toward night,” H5 III, 6, 179. “--ing to their exigent,” H6A II, 5, 9. “when mine oratory drew toward end,” R3 III, 7, 20 (Qq grew to an end). “d. to her succour,” H8 V, 4, 54. “an you d. backward,” Troil. III, 2, 47. “to d. toward an end with you,” Hml. III, 4, 216. “let your best love d. to that point, which seeks best to preserve it,” Ant. III, 4, 21. to d. near == a) to approach: R2 I, 3, 123. H6C III, 3, 138. Cor. III, 3, 39. Tim. III, 1, 41 “(nearer).” Lr. IV, 7, 25. “it --s something near to the speech we had,” Meas. I, 2, 78. Err. V, 12. “Pyramus --s near the wall,” Mids. V, 170. Tit. I, 117. Tit. I, 117 Hml. I, 4, 5. b) to come in, to enter: Tp. V, 318. All's III, 2, 101. Tim. II, 2, 46; cf. “d. nigh,” Tit. V, 3, 24. d. homewards == come home, As IV, 3, 179. to d. on == to approach: “the hour --s on,” Wiv. V, 3, 25. Meas. IV, 3, 82. Mids. I, 1, 2. “the minute --s on,” Wiv. V, 5, 2.
10) to sink in water: “greater hulks d. deep,” Troil. II, 3, 277 (cf. Deep-drawing, Draught).
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