previous next
Drink, vb. (Impf. “drank:” Shr. Ind. 2, 6. Tit. IV, 3, 85. “drunk:” All's II, 3, 106. H4A II, 4, 168. Ant. II, 5, 21. Partic. drunk). 1) to swallow liquor; absol.: Meas. I, 2, 40. Meas. I, 2, 40 Merch. I, 3, 38. H4A II, 4, 168. Tit. IV, 3, 85 etc. etc. “to d. deep,” H4A II, 4, 16. Hml. I, 2, 175. “d. of Circe's cup,” Err. V, 270. “--ing,” Tp. III, 2, 88. IV, 171 etc. “glasses is the only --ing,” H4B II, 1, 155. “--ings and swearings,” Wiv. V, 5, 168 (Evans' speech). to d. to (to d. a person's health): Tp. III, 2, 3. Tw. I, 3, 41. H4B IV, 2, 68. V, 3, 49. V, 3, 49 H6B II, 3, 59. H6B II, 3, 59 Tim. I, 2, 112. Hml. V, 2, 289. Per. II, 3, 75. IV, 3, 11. “I d. to the general joy of the whole table,” Mcb. III, 4, 89. “the king shall d. to Hamlet's better breath,” Hml. V, 2, 282. “I d. to you in a cup a sack,” H6B II, 3, 59. “it hath served me instead of a quart pot to d. in,” IV, 10, 16. Remarkable use: “I shall d. in pipe-wine first with him,” Wiv. III, 2, 90.
Trans.: Sonn. 119, 1. Tp. I, 2, 462. II, 2, 78. III, 2, 2. III, 2, 2 Wiv. III, 2, 89. Meas. III, 2, 3. Ado V, 1, 253. LLL IV, 2, 27. Shr. Ind. 2, 6. All's II, 3, 106 etc. “this do I d. to thee,” Rom. IV, 3, 58. “d. carouses to the next day's fate,” Ant. IV, 8, 34. Figuratively: “the iron would d. my tears,” John IV, 1, 62. --ing my griefs (== full of my tears) R2 IV, 189; cf. H6C V, 4, 75. Tit. III, 1, 140. “thy brother's blood the thirsty earth hath drunk,” H6C II, 3, 15. R3 I, 2, 63. “this quarrel will d. blood,” H6A II, 4, 134. -- “To d. a health:” Shr. III, 2, 198. Tw. I, 3, 40. H8 I, 4, 106. Hml. I, 2, 125. Ant. I, 2, 12. The accus. denoting the result: “had drunk himself out of his five sentences,” Wiv. I, 1, 179. “d. down all unkindness,” Wiv. I, 1, 179 “--ing oceans dry,” R2 II, 2, 146. “he --s your Dane dead drunk,” Oth. II, 3, 84. “I drunk him to his bed,” Ant. II, 5, 21. -- To d. off (== to d. at a draught): “--s off candles' ends,” H4B II, 4, 267. Rom. IV, 1, 94. V, 1, 78. Hml. V, 2, 337. to d. up (== to drink without flinching): “would d. up the lees and dregs of a flat tamed piece,” Troil. IV, 1, 61. “woo't d. up eisel,” Hml. V, 1, 299.
Drunk == intoxicated (only in the predicate; cf. Drunken): Tp. II, 1, 146. V, 278. Wiv. I, 1, 175. Meas. III, 2, 136. IV, 2, 157. IV, 2, 157 V, 188. Ado III, 3, 45. V, 1, 17. Merch. I, 2, 94. Shr. Ind. 1, 31. Tw. I, 3, 38. H4B II, 4, 230 etc. “dead drunk,” Oth. II, 3, 85. “where hath our intelligence been drunk?” John IV, 2, 116. “drunk with choler,” H4A I, 3, 129. “England's lawful earth, unlawfully made drunk with innocents' blood,” R3 IV, 4, 30. “with his own tears made drunk,” Rom. III, 3, 83, “was the hope drunk?” Mcb. I, 7, 35.
2) Figuratively, to take in by any inlet, to inhale, to hear, to see: “his nostrils d. the air,” Ven. 273. “what he breathes out, his breath --s up again,” Lucr. 1666. “make sacred even his stirrup and through him d. the free air,” Tim. I, 1, 83. “to d. their vapour,” Ant. V, 2, 213. “d. up the monarchs' plague, this flattery,” Sonn. 114, 2. Sonn. 114, 2 “take the cork out of thy mouth that I may d. thy tidings,” As III, 2, 214. “how his silence --s up this applause,” Troil. II, 3, 211. “my ears have not yet drunk a hundred words of that tongue's utterance,” Rom. II, 2, 58. “thither write, and with mine eyes I'll d. the words you send,” Cymb. I, 1, 100.
3) to swallow up, to devour, to consume: “I d. the air before me and return or ere your pulse twice beat,” Tp. V, 102 (== I annihilate distance). “is not my teeming date drunk up with time?” R2 V, 2, 91. “this would d. deep. 'twould d. the cup and all,” H5 I, 1, 20. “the air will d. the sap,” H8 I, 2, 98. “dry sorrow --s our blood,” Rom. III, 5, 59. “and spend our flatteries, to d. those men upon whose age we void it up again,” Tim. I, 2, 142.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: