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Drop, vb. 1) intr. a) to fall in drops: the tide (of tears) “that in the sweet channel of her bosom --ed,” Ven. 958. “green --ing sap,” Ven. 958 Lucr. 686. Tp. I, 2, 323. “lest resolution d. out at mine eyes in tender womanish tears,” John IV, 1, 35. Figuratively: “when tempest of commotion . . . doth begin to melt and d. upon our heads,” H4B II, 4, 394. cf. the quibble in IV, 5, 101. it (mercy) “--eth as the gentle rain from heaven upon the place beneath,” Merch. IV, 1, 185. “so much the more must pity d. upon her,” H8 II, 3, 18. cf. Wint. V, 2, 123.
b) to fall in general: “make thy weapon d.” Tp. I, 2, 473. “a crown --ing upon thy head,” II, 1, 209. cf. III, 2, 151. “hast thou not --ed from heaven,” II, 2, 140. “the weakest kind of fruit --s earliest to the ground,” Merch. IV, 1, 116. Err. II, 2, 100. As III, 2, 248. Wint. III, 2, 203. V, 1, 28. H4A IV, 1, 108. R3 IV, 4, 2. Troil. I, 3, 160. Lr. IV, 3, 24. Oth. III, 3, 311. Ant. III, 13, 161. V, 2, 92. == to fall dead: “they --ed as by a thunder-stroke,” Tp. II, 1, 204. “till one d. down a corse,” H4A IV, 1, 123. “that your son might d.” H4B I, 1, 169. H5 III, 2, 8. Cor. IV, 4, 4. Caes. II, 1, 119. Ant. V, 2, 347. -- To d. in == to come in: “and do not d. in for an after-loss,” Sonn. 90, 4.
2) trans. a) to let fall in drops: “d. sweet balm in Priam's wound,” Lucr. 1466. “d. the liquor in her eyes,” Mids. II, 1, 178. “my heart --ed love, my power rained honour on you,” H8 III, 2, 185. “a tempest --ing fire,” Caes. I, 3, 10 (== raining; cf. Lucr. 1552). Especially of tears: Lucr. 1552. R2 III, 3, 166. III, 4, 104 (Q1 fall). V, 3, 101. R3 I, 3, 354. Oth. V, 2, 350. And of blood: H5 I, 2, 19. H6A IV, 4, 18. Cor. I, 5, 19. III, 1, 301. Caes. IV, 3, 73. Cymb. V, 5, 148. -- Absolutely: “with a --ing industry they skip from stem to stern,” Per. IV, 1, 63 (i. e. dripping wet). And to d. == to weep: “in summer's drought I'll d. upon thee still,” Tit. III, 1, 19. “with an auspicious and a --ing eye,” Hml. I, 2, 11.
b) to let fall in general: “--ed a precious jewel in a flood,” Ven. 824. “on this couple d. a blessed crown,” Tp. V, 202. “I'll d. the paper,” LLL IV, 3, 43; cf. Tw. II, 3, 168. III, 2, 83. Caes. II, 1, 49. “you d. manna in the way of starved people,” Merch. V, 294. “d. gold,” All's IV, 3, 252. “she --s booties in my mouth,” Wint. IV, 4, 863. “--ing the hides and hips,” H5 IV, 2, 47 (F2. H5 IV, 2, 47 H5 IV, 2, 47 drooping). “--ed his knife,” Tit. II, 4, 50. “whose loves I may not d.” Mcb. III, 1, 122. to d. down: “he --s down the knee before him,” Tim. I, 1, 60. to d. forth, of a tree yielding its fruit: “when it --s forth such fruit,” As III, 2, 250; and == to bring forth in general: “women's gentle brain could not d. forth such giantrude invention,” IV, 3, 34.
c) to submerge, to plunge, to drown: “he'll d. his heart into the sink of fear,” H5 III, 5, 59. (the gods) “in our own filth d. our clear judgments,” Ant. III, 13, 113.
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