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Dust, 1) fine, dry particles of earth, covering the ground and raised by the wind: Lucr. 1381. Gentl. II, 3, 35. Mids. V, 397. R2 III, 2, 146. III, 3, 43. V, 2, 6. V, 2, 6 H4A I, 3, 134. H4B I, 3, 103. H6C V, 1, 56. V, 2, 23. Cor. III, 1, 171. Tit. III, 1, 12. Tim. V, 2, 16. Hml. V, 1, 274. Lr. IV, 6, 201. V, 3, 137. Ant. III, 6, 48. Per. I, 1, 97. II, 2, 55. “to grind to d.” Cor. III, 2, 103. Tit. V, 2, 187. “crumble up to d.” John V, 7, 31.
2) a single particle of earth: “was in mine eye the d. that did offend it,” All's V, 3, 55. “blow each d., each straw, each little rub out of the path,” John III, 4, 128. “a grain, a d., a gnat,” IV, 1, 93. “to touch a d. of England's ground,” R2 II, 3, 91.
3) Used figuratively, a) for any worthless thing: “vile gold, dross, d.” John III, 1, 165. H6C V, 2, 27. Troil. III, 3, 178. Caes. III, 1, 116. Lr. IV, 2, 30. -- b) as the emblem of age and oblivion: “smear with d. their glittering golden towers,” Lucr. 945. “the d. and injury of age,” Sonn. 108, 10. “are they like to take d.?” Tw. I, 3, 135. R2 II, 1, 294. H5 II, 4, 87. Cor. II, 3, 126. -- c) as the common origin of all things in existence: “a thousand grains that issue out of d.” Meas. III, 1, 21. “a piece of valiant d.” Ado II, 1, 64. Hml. II, 2, 321. Cymb. IV, 2, 5. -- d) as that to which all things return in death: Sonn. 32, 2. All's II, 3, 147. Wint. IV, 4, 469. John III, 4, 32. IV, 2, 120. H4A V, 4, 85. H4B IV, 5, 116. H6A V, 3, 29. H6B III, 3, 14. Rom. V, 3, 13. Hml. I, 2, 71. IV, 2, 6. V, 1, 232. Cymb. IV, 2, 247. Cymb. IV, 2, 247 == the remains of the dead: “weep their d.” All's V, 3, 64. “the d. of Alexander,” Hml. V, 1, 225.
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