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Dwell, 1) to have one's habitation, a) in a house or what is like it: Ven. 1173. Sonn. 71, 4. Tp. I, 2, 457. Tp. I, 2, 457 Gentl. I, 1, 43. Wiv. I, 2, 2. II, 2, 48. Meas. II, 1, 261. Ado V, 1, 186. Merch. II, 2, 49. II, 6, 25. As III, 2, 352. As III, 2, 352 V, 4, 62. Tw. III, 1, 9. Wint. II, 1, 30. R2 I, 2, 72. H6B IV, 10, 68. H8 IV, 2, 126. Rom. III, 2, 84. V, 1, 38. Caes. II, 1, 285. III, 3, 7. III, 3, 7 III, 3, 7 Per. IV, 6, 83. V, 1, 123. b) in a country: Tp. II, 1, 246. Epil. Tp. II, 1, 246 Gentl. IV, 2, 52. All's II, 3, 301. Tw. II, 3, 84. R2 I, 3, 177. H6C III, 1, 74. Cor. IV, 5, 40. Cor. IV, 5, 40 Hml. I, 5, 123. Oth. I, 1, 70. Per. V Prol. Per. V Prol.
2) to abide, to remain, to continue: “I'll rather d. in my necessity,” Merch. I, 3, 157. “you shall let it d. darkly with you,” All's IV, 3, 13 (i. e. keep it secret). “he should still d. in his musings,” H8 III, 2, 133.
3) to have one's seat, to live, to exist: out none (viz face) “where all distress and dolour --ed,” Lucr. 1446. “Sinon in this cold hot-burning fire doth dwell,” Lucr. 1446 “the lovely gaze where every eye doth d.” Sonn. 5, 2. “you live in this and d. in lovers' eyes,” 55, 14. “lean penury within that pen doth d.” 84, 5. “in my tongue thy name no more shall d.” 89, 10. 93, 10. 99, 4. Compl. 129. Wiv. III, 5, 72. Err. III, 1, 104. Mids. I, 1, 206. H5 IV, 3, 27. R3 I, 2, 59. IV, 2, 67. Rom. II, 2, 187. Mcb. III, 2, 7. Oth. IV, 1, 84. Per. III, 2, 36.
4) to lie, to depend on, to be in the power of; followed by in: “my hopes in heaven do d.” H8 III, 2, 460. “though't be a sportful combat, yet in the trial much opinion --s,” Troil. I, 3, 336. “value --s not in particular will,” II, 2, 53. “whose easy-borrowed pride --s in the fickle grace of her he follows,” Lr. II, 4, 189. Followed by upon: “what great danger --s upon my suit?” Ven. 206. By with: “to be wise and love exceeds man's might; that --s with gods above.” Troil. III, 2, 165.
5) Followed by on, == a) to stand on, to stick to, to make much of: “she --s so securely on the excellency of her honour,” Wiv. II, 2, 251. “fain would I d. on form,” Rom. II, 2, 88. b) to continue long in: “sweet discourse, which so long sundered friends should d. upon,” R3 V, 3, 100. “more than I have said, the leisure and enforcement of the time forbids to d. upon,” R3 V, 3, 100
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