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Dead, adj. 1) deprived of life: Tp. II, 2, 25. Tp. II, 2, 25 Tp. II, 2, 25 III, 1, 6. Gentl. IV, 2, 106. IV, 4, 80 etc. etc. “well-nigh d. for me,” Ado V, 4, 81 (languishing for me). “almost d. for breath,” Mcb. I, 5, 37 (instead of for want of breath; cf. “to sink for food,” Cymb. III, 6, 17; “cold for action,” H5 I, 2, 114). “the d.:” Sonn. 31, 7. 68, 5. Mids. V, 356. “our English d.” H5 IV, 8, 107. “these d.” H6A IV, 7, 81. the d. == the dead man, Caes. III, 2, 131 etc. “to do him d.” H6C I, 4, 108. “felled him d.” Lr. IV, 2, 76. “kill her d.” Mids. III, 2, 269. Hml. III, 2, 194. “hit me d.” Troil. IV, 5, 251 (cf. Strike). d. men's fingers, == the plant orchis mascula: Hml. IV, 7, 173. He's but a d. man == he must die: Wiv. IV, 2, 44. “d. men's cries do fill the empty air,” H6B V, 2, 4. “thou art d.” Cymb. V, 5, 299.
To be d. sometimes == to have died: “the lady is d upon mine accusation,” Ado V, 1, 249. “my Nell is d. in the spital of malady of France,” H5 V, 1, 86. “who finds the partridge in the puttock's nest, but may imagine how the bird was dead, although the kite soar with unbloodied beak?” H6B III, 2, 192. “if that I had been d., thou wouldest not have mourned so much for me,” IV, 4, 23. “my wife is d. to-night,” Rom. V, 3, 210. “your eldest daughters have fordone themselves, and desperately are d.” Lr. V, 3, 292.
Figurative use: “my love to her is d.” Gentl. II, 6, 28. “he will awake my mercy which lies d.” John IV, 1, 26. “d. coals,” Wint. V, 1, 68. John V, 2, 83. “by the d. and drowsy fire,” Mids. V, 399. John IV, 1, 106. “thou d. elm,” H4B II, 4, 358. “our decrees, d. to infliction, to themselves are d.” Meas. I, 3, 28. “why should false painting imitate his cheek and steal d. seeing of his living hue?” Sonn. 67, 6 (d. seeming?).
2) similar to death: “we were d. of sleep,” Tp. V, 230. “strike more d. than common sleep of all these five the sense,” Mids. IV, 1, 86. “he drinks your Dane d. drunk,” Oth. II, 3, 85. “so dull, so d. in look, so woebegone,” H4B I, 1, 71. “honest Iago, that lookest d. with grieving,” Oth. II, 3, 177 (== deadly pale). R2 III, 2, 79.
3) bringing death, deadly: “so should a murderer look, so d., so grim,” Mids. III, 2, 57. we free thee from the d. blow of it (our displeasure) Wint. IV, 4, 445. “you breathe these d. news in as d. an ear,” John V, 7, 65. “in that d. time when Gloster's death was plotted,” R2 IV, 10 (or == dark and dreary?).
4) still as death: “d. midnight,” Sonn. 43, 11. Meas. IV, 2, 67. H5 III Chor. H5 III Chor. R3 V, 3, 180. “the night's d. silence,” Gentl. III, 2, 85. “at d. time of the night,” Tit. II, 3, 99. “at this d. hour,” Hml. I, 1, 65. “in the d. vast and middle of the night,” I, 2, 198.
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