previous next
Deep, adj. 1) descending far, entering far: “d. sounds,” Lucr. 1329. “as d. as hell,” Wiv. III, 5, 14. Meas. III, 1, 94. “d. glass,” Merch. I, 2, 104. “well,” R2 IV, 184. Rom. III, 1, 99. “dungeon,” H4B IV, 3, 9. “brook,” H6B III, 1, 53. “grave,” III, 2, 150. “bosom of the ocean,” R3 I, 1, 4. “pit,” Tit. II, 3, 240. “sea,” Rom. II, 2, 134. “waters,” Per. IV, 2, 159. “healths five fathom d.” Rom. I, 4, 85. (“potations pottle-d.” Oth. II, 3, 56). “the anchor is d.” Wiv. I, 3, 56. “so d. a root,” H6A II, 4, 85. “d. nook,” Tp. I, 2, 227. “it shall not wind with such a d. indent,” H4A III, 1, 104. “d. wound,” Sonn. 133, 2. Gentl. V, 4, 71. Tit. III, 1, 247. “scars,” Err. V, 193. H6B I, 1, 87. “hurt,” Rom. III, 1, 99. “so d. a maim,” R2 I, 3, 156. “incision,” I, 1, 155. Tropically: “those honours d. and broad,” Mcb. I, 6, 17 (extensive in all directions). “d. oblivion,” R3 III, 7, 129 (Qq dark; as it were, buried). “in this sin he is as d. as I,” I, 4, 220. Hence == far from the outer part: “some dark d. desert,” Lucr. 1144. And used of time: “d. night,” H6B I, 4, 19. “midnight,” Mids. I, 1, 223. “--est winter,” Tim. III, 4, 14.
2) loud, full-toned, sonorous: “and with d. groans the diapason bear,” Lucr. 1132. “the thunder, that d. and dreadful organ-pipe,” Tp. III, 3, 98. “the d. dread-bolted thunder,” Lr. IV, 7, 33. “between two dogs, which hath the --er mouth,” H6A II, 4, 12. “the tongues of dying men enforce attention like d. harmony,” R2 II, 1, 6. cf. “from his d. chest laughs out a loud applause,” Troil. I, 3, 163 (see Deeply).
3) Very variously used in a figurative sense; a) coming from, or dwelling in the inmost heart, heartfelt; and therefore intense: “d. delight,” Pilgr. 113. “desire,” Ven. 389. Mcb. I, 4, 51. “contempt,” R3 IV, 2, 124 (wanting in Ff). “curses, not loud but d.” Mcb. V, 3, 27. “despair,” H6C III, 3, 12. “disgrace,” R3 I, 1, 111. “extremes,” Tit. III, 1, 216. “exclaims,” R3 I, 2, 52. “grief,” Hml. IV, 5, 76. “groans,” Ven. 377. Lucr. 1132. Lucr. 1132 Gentl. III, 1, 230. cf. “sighs,” Pilgr. 275. Rom. I, 1, 139. “kindness,” Sonn. 152, 9. “laments,” Tit. III, 2, 46. “my heart's d. languor,” Tit. III, 1, 13. “loathing,” Mids. II, 2, 138. true<*>zeal and d. integrity, R2 V, 3, 108. “love,” Gentl. I, 1, 21. Gentl. I, 1, 21 Rom. II, 2, 134. “melancholy,” H6B V, 1, 34. “prayers,” R3 I, 4, 69. “this dear and d. rebuke,” H4B IV, 5, 141. “repentance,” Mcb. I, 4, 7. “shame,” Err. V, 253. John IV, 2, 235. “sorrow,” Tit. III, 1, 217. “torture,” Lucr. 1287. “unrest,” Lucr. 1287 “vexation,” Lucr. 1287 “vow,” Lucr. 1287 cf. “oaths,” Sonn. 152, 9. LLL I, 1, 23 (see Deep-sworn, and Cymb. II, 3, 96: “I swear I love you. If you but said so, 'twere as d. with me). d. woes,” Lucr. 1118. “natures of such d. trust,” Lr. II, 1, 117. “intending d. suspicion,” R3 III, 5, 8. H8 III, 1, 53. “malice,” R2 I, 1, 155. Cor. IV, 6, 41. “to fill the mouth of d. defiance up,” H4A III, 2, 116. “d. enemies,” R3 IV, 2, 73. “with such a d. demeanour in great sorrow,” H4B IV, 5, 85. “of thy d. duty more impression show,” Cor. V, 3, 51. “why should you fall into so d. an O?” Rom. III, 3, 90. “O, that our night of woe might have remembered my --est sense how hard true sorrow hits,” Sonn. 120, 10.
b) sagacious, penetrating, profound: “sad pause and d. regard beseem the sage,” Lucr. 277. Lucr. 277 “by d. surmise,” Lucr. 277 “policy,” Lucr. 277 “question,” Compl. 121. “conceit,” Pilgr. 109. “a chough of as d. chat,” Tp. II, 1, 266. “a d. story of a --er love,” Gentl. I, 1, 23. “the spirit of d. prophecy she hath,” H6A I, 2, 55. “hold me pace in d. experiments,” H4A III, 1, 49. “d. intent,” R3 I, 1, 149. “plots,” Hml. V, 2, 9 (Ff dear). In an ill sense, == artful, insidious: “d. deceit,” H6B III, 1, 57. “d. traitors,” R3 I, 3, 224. “d., hollow, treacherous,” II, 1, 38.
c) proficient, versed, well skilled: “how d. you were within the books of God,” H4B IV, 2, 17. “counterfeit the d. tragedian,” R3 III, 5, 5. “meditating with two d. divines,” III, 7, 75. “d. clerks she dumbs,” Per. V Prol. Per. V Prol.
d) touching near, important: “I'll read you matter d. and dangerous,” H4A I, 3, 190. “d. designs and matters of great moment,” R3 III, 7, 67. “my d. service,” IV, 2, 123 (or == having gone such lengths?). “to betray us in --est consequence,” Mcb. I, 3, 126. “if you said so, 'twere as d. with me,” Cymb. II, 3, 96.
e) heavy, grievous: 'tis much d. (viz a debt), Tim. III, 4, 30. “the d. damnation of his taking off,” Mcb. I, 7, 20. “sin,” Lucr. 701. R2 I, 1, 187 (Ff foul). R3 III, 1, 43 (Ff great). “vice,” R3 II, 2, 28 (Qq foul guile).
f) Used of colours, == dark, intense: “the canker-blooms have full as d. a dye as the perfumed tincture of the roses,” Sonn. 54, 5. “the d. vermilion in the rose,” 98, 10.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: