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Defy, 1) to dare, to brave with contempt: thy registers and thee (time) “I both d.” Sonn. 123, 9. Tp. III, 2, 140. Wiv. II, 2, 74. Meas. II, 1, 86. As IV, 3, 32. John II, 155. R2 I, 1, 60. H4A III, 3, 71. H6A III, 1, 27. H6B IV, 10, 67. H6C II, 2, 118. H6C II, 2, 118 H8 V, 4, 58. Cor. III, 3, 79. Rom. V, 1, 24 (only in Q1; the rest of O. Edd. deny). V, 3, 68.
2) to slight, to despise, to renounce: “age, I do d. thee,” Pilgr. 167. “love's denying, faith's --ing,” Pilgr. 167 complexions that liked me, and breaths that I --ed not, As Epil. Pilgr. 167 “fools that for a tricksy word d. the matter,” Merch. III, 5, 75. “I d. lechery,” Tw. I, 5, 133. “d. the devil, consider he's an enemy to mankind,” III, 4, 108. “I d. all counsel, all redress,” John III, 4, 23. “all studies here I solemnly d.” H4A I, 3, 228. “I cannot flatter, I d. the tongues of soothers,” IV, 1, 6. “and so, proud-hearted Warwick, I d. thee, and to my brother turn my blushing cheeks,” H6C V, 1, 98. “d. the foul fiend,” Lr. III, 4, 101. “we d. augury,” Hml. V, 2, 230. “have you that a man may deal withal, and d. the surgeon?” Per. IV, 6, 29.
3) to challenge: “I dare and do d. thee for a villain,” Err. V, 32. “if you offend him, I for him d. you,” Tw. III, 4, 345. John II, 406. H4A V, 2, 32. H5 II, 1, 76. III, 3, 5 “(d. us to our worst).” Ant. II, 2, 160. Cymb. III, 1, 68.
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