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Derive, 1) to draw as from a source, to gain: “from thine eyes my knowledge I d.” Sonn. 14, 9. “to find out this abuse, whence 'tis --d,” Meas. V, 247. LLL IV, 3, 302. LLL IV, 3, 302 Wint. I, 2, 112. H4B I, 1, 206. Tim. I, 2, 8. III, 4, 69. IV, 3, 162. Lr. I, 2, 87. “O, that estates, degrees and offices were not --d corruptly,” Merch. II, 9, 42 (== got, gained). “how is this --d?” H4B I, 1, 23 (== whence do you know this?). Reflectively, == to originate: “his indignation --s itself out of a very competent injury,” Tw. III, 4, 269.
2) to draw upon one, to cause: “things which would d. me ill will to speak of,” All's V, 3, 265. “what friend of mine that had to him --d your anger, did I continue in my liking?” H8 II, 4, 32.
3) to receive by descent: “treason is not inherited; or if we did d. it from our friends, what's that to me?” As I, 3, 64. “she --s her honesty and achieves her goodness,” All's I, 1, 52. “honours thrive, when rather from our acts we them d. than our foregoers,” II, 3, 143. “his true titles to some certain dukedoms --d from Edward,” H5 I, 1, 89.
Reflectively, == to be inherited, to descend: “this shame --s itself from unknown loins,” Ado IV, 1, 137. “this crown . . . which --s itself to me,” H4B IV, 5, 43.
4) Partic. derived == descended: “thou wast not to this end from me --d,” Lucr. 1755. “you are well --d,” Gentl. V, 2, 23. V, 4, 146. Mids. I, 1, 99. All's V, 3, 159. R2 II, 2, 34. H5 II, 4, 91. H6A II, 5, 74. H6A II, 5, 74 H6C I, 4, 119 “(of).” Caes. II, 1, 322.
5) to deduce, to prove logically: “d. this,” Troil. II, 3, 66 (cf. Decline).
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