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Desperate, 1) hopeless: “d. in his suit,” Ven. 336. “whose d. hands themselves do slay,” Ven. 765. Tp. III, 3, 104. Tw. II, 2, 8. John III, 1, 32. H4A III, 1, 198. H6A IV, 2, 50. IV, 6, 54. H6C I, 4, 42. R3 II, 2, 99. H8 I, 2, 35. Tit. V, 3, 75. Rom. IV, 3, 54. V, 1, 36. V, 3, 59. V, 3, 59 V, 3, 59 Hml. V, 1, 243. Cymb. V, 5, 58. Used of things, == suggested by despair: “to find some d. instrument of death,” Lucr. 1038. “she will do a d. outrage to herself,” Ado II, 3, 159. Wint. IV, 4, 496. R3 V 3 Wint. IV, 4, 496 Hml. II, 1, 104. Oth. V, 2, 207. Followed by of: “I am d. of obtaining her,” Gentl. III, 2, 5. “d. of their bones,” H5 IV, 2, 39. “I am d. of my fortunes,” Oth. II, 3, 337.
2) put beside one's self, mightily agitated: “will he not wake and in a desperate rage post hither,” Lucr. 219. “she d. with her nails her flesh doth tear,” Lucr. 219 he waxes d. with imagination, Hml. I 4, 87. “go after her, she's d., govern her,” Lr. V, 3, 161.
3) despaired of, irremediable, not to be saved; or at least extremely dangerous: “and I d. approve desire is death,” Sonn. 147, 7. “my suit then is d.” Wiv. III, 5, 127. All's I, 3, 235. Tw. II, 2, 38. H6C IV, 1, 129. R3 IV, 4, 232. Rom. I, 2, 49. IV, 1, 70. Tim. III, 4, 103. IV, 3, 469. Hml. IV, 3, 9. IV, 7, 26. Cymb. IV, 3, 6.
4) reckless, regardless of danger or any other consideration: “careless lust stirs up a d. courage,” Ven. 556. “tutored in the rudiments of many d. studies by his uncle,” As V, 4, 32 (i. e. forbidden by law). “and venture madly on a d. mart,” Shr. II, 329. “skill infinite or monstrous d.” All's II, 1, 187. “this is a fond and d. creature,” V, 3, 178. “as dissolute as d.” R2 V, 3, 20. “an enterprise more venturous or d. than this,” H6A II, 1, 45. “unheedful, d., wild adventure,” IV, 4, 7. “thy school-days frightful, d., wild and furious,” R3 IV, 4, 169. “though he be grown so d. to be honest,” H8 III, 1, 86. “are you so d. grown, to threat your friends,” Tit. II, 1, 40. “I will make a d. tender of my child's love,” Rom. III, 4, 12 (i. e. overbold). “a d. execution,” IV, 1, 69. “d. appliance,” Hml. IV, 3, 10. “a d. train,” Lr. II, 4, 308. “quietness would purge by any d. change,” Ant. I, 3, 54.
Followed by of: “d. of shame and state,” Tw. V, 67 (== reckless of disgrace and danger).
5) Hence used to mark any bad quality predominating in a high degree: “virginity should be buried in highways as a d. offendress against nature,” All's I, 1, 153. “Salisbury is a d. homicide,” H6A I, 2, 25. “the d. tempest hath so banged the Turks,” Oth. II, 1, 21.
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