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Despite, subst. malice, aversion, contemptuous hate: “in vain I spurn at my confirmed d.” Lucr. 1026. “thy intercepter, full of d.” Tw. III, 4, 243. “hag of all d.” H6A III, 2, 52. “who crowned the gracious duke in high d.” H6C II, 1, 59. “that I in all d. might rail at him,” II, 6, 81. “d. o'erwhelm thee,” Cor. III, 1, 164. “follow him with all d.” III, 3, 139. “has thrown such d. and heavy terms upon her,” Oth. IV, 2, 116. Followed by of: “thou wast ever an obstinate heretic in the d. of beauty,” Ado I, 1, 237.
In d. == 1) out of malice: “on whom, as in d., the sun looks pale,” H5 III, 5, 17. “scant our former having in d.” Oth. IV, 3, 92.
2) in defiance of another's power or inclination: “when beauty boasted blushes, in d. virtue would stain that o'er with silver white,” Lucr. 55. “we come but in d.” Mids. V, 112. an onion . . . shall in d. enforce a watery eye, Shr. Ind. I, 128. “and in d. I'll cram thee with more food,” Rom. V, 3, 48. Followed by “of:” Ven. 731. Sonn. 141, 4. Wiv. V, 5, 132. Ado II, 1, 398. III, 2, 68. III, 4, 89. As I, 3, 25. II, 5, 49. Shr. Ind. 2, 129. John III, 3, 52. H6B I, 1, 94. IV, 8, 63. H6C I, 1, 154. I, 1, 158 “(in d. of me).” IV, 1, 146. IV, 3, 43. Hml. III, 4, 192. Cymb. V, 5, 58. “in my d.” Tit. I, 361. Cymb. IV, 1, 16. “in thy d.” H6A IV, 7, 22. “in your d.” Cymb. I, 6, 135. Singular passage: “I will depart in quiet, and in d. of mirth mean to be merry,” Err. III, 1, 108; i. e. I will defy mirth itself to keep pace with me; I will outjest mirth itself (cf. the German trotz).
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