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Embrace, vb. 1) to clasp in the arms: Pilgr. 147. Tp. V, 109. Tp. V, 109 Err. V, 413. Shr. IV, 5, 34. Tw. V, 258. Wint. V, 2, 57. V, 3, 111. John II, 306. H4A V, 2, 74. H6A II, 5, 37. V, 3, 171. H6B IV, 4, 6. H6C I, 1, 202. II, 3, 45. R3 II, 1, 25. H8 V, 3, 158. H8 V, 3, 158 Troil. IV, 5, 135. Troil. IV, 5, 135 Troil. IV, 5, 135 Tit. V, 2, 69. V, 3, 108. Lr. V, 3, 176. Cymb. V, 4, 139. Per. V, 1, 223. V, 3, 55. Absolutely: “her hard --ing,” Ven. 559. “--ing bushes,” Ven. 559 “locks her in --ing,” Wint. V, 2, 84. “let me e. too,” Troil. IV, 4, 15. “let me e. with old Vincentio,” Shr. IV, 5, 68. “their breaths --d together,” Oth. II, 1, 266. Used of sexual intercourse: Lucr. 518. Ado IV, 1, 50.
2) to join in an embrace, to clasp each other: “now kiss, e.” Gentl. I, 2, 129. “after we had --d,” Wiv. III, 5, 74. “let us e.” LLL IV, 3, 213. H4A V, 2, 99. H4B IV, 2, 63. R3 III, 3, 24. “--d from the ends of opposed winds,” Wint. I, 1, 33. “e. and kiss,” H6B III, 2, 354. “they join, e.” H6C II, 1, 29. Of sexual intercourse: “your brother and his lover have --d,” Meas. I, 4, 40.
3) to surround, to encompass: “you'll see your Rome --d with fire,” Cor. V, 2, 7. Quibbling: “and girdle with --ing flames the waist of Collatine's fair love,” Lucr. 6. “hugged and --d by the strumpet wind,” Merch. II, 6, 16. “--d by a piece of tender air,” Cymb. V, 4, 139. Figuratively: “let grief and sorrow still e. his heart,” Tp. V, 214. “even such a passion do h e. my bosom,” Troil. III, 2, 37 (cf. Engirt).
4) to welcome, to receive with joy; a) of persons: “when first I did e. him,” Cor. IV, 7, 10. “whom this beneath world doth e. and hug with amplest entertainment,” Tim. I, 1, 44. “with joy he will e. you,” Cymb. III, 4, 179. b) of things: “yet strive I to e. mine infamy,” Lucr. 504. you e. your charge too wi<*>lingly, Ado I, 1, 103. V, 1, 303. “you e. the occasion to depart,” Merch. I, 1, 64. let thy blood and spirit e. them (thy Fates), Tw. II, 5, 150. “his enfranchisement,” R2 I, 3, 89. the one and other (salutation and lefiance) “Diomed --s,” Troil. IV, 1, 14. “I e. it freely.” Hml. V, 2, 263.
5) to tend, to cherish: “quicken his --d heaviness,” Merch. II, 8, 52. “to e. your own safey and give over this attempt,” As I, 2, 189. “you never shall e. each other's love in banishment,” R2 I, 3, 184. “he knows that you e. not Antony as you did love, but as you feared him,” Ant. III, 13, 56.
6) to take, to accept: “to e. your offer,” Tw. V, 328. “e. but my direction,” Wint. IV, 4, 534. “we must e. this gentle offer of the perilous time,” John IV, 3, 12. “the means that heaven yields must be --d,” R2 III, 2, 29. “let it be a quarrel between us. I e. it,” H5 IV, 1, 221. “e. we then this opportunity,” H6A II, 1, 13. “e. his pardon,” H6B IV, 8, 14. “he would e. no counsel,” Tim. III, 1, 27. “he would e. the means to come by it,” Caes. II, 1, 259. “with sorrow I e. my fortune,” Hml. V, 2, 399. “which do not be entreated to, but weigh what it is worth --d,” Ant. II, 6, 33. “I e. these conditions,” Cymb. I, 4, 168. “I will e. your offer,” Per. III, 3, 38.
7) to undergo, to suffer, to submit to: “e. thy death,” Gentl. V, 4, 126. “what cannot be eschewed must be --d,” Wiv. V, 5, 251. which (death) “though myself would gladly have --d,” Err. I, 1, 70. whom (death) “I myself e. to set him free,” All's III, 4, 17. “I e. this fortune patiently,” H4A V, 5, 12. “let me e. thee, sour adversity,” H6C III, 1, 24. “Fleance must e. the fate of that dark hour,” Mcb. III, 1, 137. “thou unsubstantial air that I e.” Lr. IV, 1, 7 (cf. Air).
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