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Enter, 1) intr. a) to go in, come in: Ven. 780. Ven. 780 Tp. IV, 216. Meas. II, 2, 152. Err. II, 2, 212. Err. II, 2, 212 Ado II, 1, 87. III, 1, 9. H6A III, 2, 25. IV, 2, 18 (cf. On). H6C I, 3, 22. Cor. III, 1, 111 etc. With at: “pity --s at an iron gate,” Lucr. 595. “e. at her window,” Gentl. III, 1, 113. “at the abbey,” Err. V, 278. “term such as will e. at a lady's ear,” H5 V, 2, 100. “fame late --ing at his heedful ears,” H6C III, 3, 63. Joined with the adv. in: “longs to e. in,” R2 I, 3, 2 (== to e. the lists). “by fair or foul means, must we e. in,” H6C IV, 7, 14. Followed by the prepos. in, into and within: “may with foul intrusion e. in and dwell upon your grave,” Err. III, 1, 103. “to e. in my house,” IV, 4, 67. V, 92. “--ed in a brake,” Mids. III, 2, 15. “let it not e. in your mind of love,” Merch. II, 8, 42. “to e. in the castle,” R2 II, 3, 160. “the sweetest sleep that ever --ed in a drowsy head,” R3 V, 3, 228. “are --ed in the Roman territories,” Cor. IV, 6, 40. “swift to e. in the desperate thoughts of men,” Rom. V, 1, 36. “these words e. in our ears like . . . .,” Tim. V, 1, 199. “these words like daggers e. in mine ears,” Hml. III, 4, 95. “--ing into some monastery,” Meas. IV, 2, 217. “e. into that brake,” Mids. III, 1, 77. “Pucelle is --ed into Orleans,” H6A I, 5, 36. “that we e., as into our dukedom,” H6C IV, 7, 9. “within this bosom never --ed yet the dreadful motion of a murderous thought,” John IV, 2, 254.
b) to make a solemn entry: “I am bound to e. publicly,” Meas. IV, 3, 101. IV, 4, 10. IV, 6, 15. H6C IV, 7, 9.
c) as a technical term of the stage, == to appear on the scene: “Pyramus e.” Mids. III, 1, 103. “she is to e. now,” V, 186. “the competitors e.” Tw. IV, 2, 12. Substantively: “his e. and exit shall be strangling a snake,” LLL V, 1, 141.
d) to have a passage, to find room between: “so wide as a bristle may e.” Tw. I, 5, 3. “admits no orifex for a point as subtle as Ariachne's broken woof to e.” Troil. V, 2, 152.
e) to engage: “I am here --ed in bond for you,” Err. IV, 4, 128; cf. R2 V, 2, 65. “e. into a quarrel,” Ado II, 3, 203. “since I have --ed into these wars,” H6A I, 2, 132. “sith I am --ed in this cause so far,” Oth. III, 3, 411.
2) trans. a) to come or go into: “e. this sweet city,” Lucr. 469. “you shall see her chamber-window --ed,” Ado III, 2, 116. “e. his forbidden gates,” LLL II, 26. Merch. II, 5, 35. V, 273. As II, 3, 28. H6B III, 2, 132. IV, 10, 27. R3 I, 3, 195. Cor. II, 2, 114. V, 6, 6. Rom. III, 1, 6 etc. “terrible to e. human hearing,” Tp. I, 2, 265 (cf. Merch. II, 5, 35 and R3 I, 3, 195). “to e. the cloister,” Meas. I, 2, 182 (== to become a nun). to e. the lists, (viz as a combatant), H6B II, 3, 50; cf. R2 I, 3, 2.
b) to pierce: “his sides are better proof than thy spear's point can e.” Ven. 626. “thorns which --ed their frail shins,” Tp. IV, 181. “that it may e. Mowbray's breast,” R2 I, 2, 48. I, 3, 75. “this respite shook the bosom of my conscience, --ed me, yea, with a splitting power,” H8 II, 4, 182.
c) to engage in, to begin: “e. talk with lords,” H6A III, 1, 63. “have you --ed the action?” H4B II, 1, 1 (== have you brought an action? commenced a lawsuit?). cf. I have --ed him and all, 10 (blunderingly == the action against him).
d) to initiate: “'tis our hope, after well --ed soldiers, to return,” All's II, 1, 6. “they of Rome are --ed in our counsels,” Cor. I, 2, 2. cf. Man-entered. Hence == to introduce favourably, to recommend: “this sword shall e. me with him,” Ant. IV, 14, 113.
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