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Fly, vb. (impf. flew -- never == fled --: Compl. 60. Merch. III, 1, 30. H6A I, 1, 124. H6B II, 1, 6. H8 IV, 1, 74. Troil. IV, 5, 246. Lr. IV, 2, 76. Part. “flown:” Sonn. 145, 12. Wint. IV, 3, 105. H4B IV, 5, 229. Mcb. III, 2, 40. Lr. IV, 6, 92. Cymb. III, 5, 61). 1) to pass through the air by the aid of wings or other means: Ven. 304. Lucr. 1010. Lucr. 1010 Lucr. 1010 Sonn. 78, 6. Tp. I, 2, 190. IV, 74. V, 91. Gentl. II, 7, 11. III, 1, 141. Mids. II, 1, 156. Merch. I, 1, 14. II, 6, 5. III, 1, 30. As II, 7, 86. IV, 1, 165. All's III, 2, 113 (bullets). John IV, 2, 175. H6A I, 1, 75. II, 4, 11. IV, 5, 55. R3 I, 4, 133 (out). V, 2, 23. H8 IV, 1, 74 (up). Tit. IV, 4, 82. Lr. IV, 6, 92 etc. Followed by an accus. denoting a measure: “what a pitch she flew,” H6B II, 1, 6. “f. an ordinary pitch,” Caes. I, 1, 78. “--s an eagle flight,” Tim. I, 1, 49. “ere the bat hath flown his cloistered flight,” Mcb. III, 2, 40.
2) to move rapidly and eagerly: “as falcon to the lure, away she --es,” Ven. 1027. “the very instant that I saw you did my heart f. to your service,” Tp. III, 1, 65. “f., run, hue and cry,” Wiv. IV, 5, 93. “in the morning early will we both f. toward Belmont,” Merch. IV, 1, 457. “here, there, and every where, enraged he flew,” H6A I, 1, 124. “the duke of Alençon --eth to his side,” H6A I, 1, 95. “all f. to him,” H6A I, 1, 95 “we will not f., but to our enemies' throats,” H6A I, 1, 95 “made the lame to leap and f. away,” H6B II, 1, 162. “many f. to him,” H6C II, 2, 71. “f. to the duke,” R3 IV, 4, 443. “do they still f. to the Roman,” Cor. IV, 7, 1. “flew on him,” Lr. IV, 2, 76. “she's flown to her desired Posthumus,” Cymb. III, 5, 61. to f. out == to rush out, to break out: “their blood thinks scorn, till it f. out and show them princes born,” Cymb. IV, 4, 54. “my valour . . . . for him shall f. out of itself,” Cor. I, 10, 19 (== shall break out of, leave, deny, its own nature). “his spirits f. out into my story,” Cymb. III, 3, 90 (i. e. he loses consciousness and identifies himself with the hero of my story). “having flown over many knavish professions, he settled only in rogue,” Wint. IV, 3, 105 (== having tried in a flippant manner).
3) to pass away, to depart: observed (the hours) “as they flew,” Compl. 60. “what is infirm from your sound parts shall f.” All's II, 1, 170. “health with youthful wings is flown from . . . .,” H4B IV, 5, 229. “the breach whereout Hector's great spirit flew,” Troil. IV, 5, 246.
4) to proceed: “O, that forced thunder from his heart did f.” Compl. 325. “all the honours that can f. from us shall on them settle,” All's III, 1, 20. “his words do from such passion f. that he believes himself,” Tw. III, 4, 407. “yet have I gold --es from another coast,” H6B I, 2, 93. cf. Lucr. 177. Lucr. 177
5) to flee; a) intr.: Ven. 674. Ven. 674 Lucr. 230. Lucr. 230 Lucr. 230 Sonn. 143, 7. 145, 12. Gentl. IV, 3, 29. Wiv. II, 2, 215. IV, 4, 55. V, 5, 107. Err. V, 184. LLL V, 2, 86. Mids. II, 1, 231. Mids. II, 1, 231 As I, 3, 102. H6A III, 2, 107. H6C I, 4, 40. Ant. III, 13, 11 etc. to f. from == 1) to leave, to forsake: “from thy altar do I f.” All's II, 3, 80. “before young Talbot from old Talbot f.” H6A IV, 6, 46. H6C V, 4, 34. “wilt thou, O God, f. from such gentle lambs?” R3 IV, 4, 22. V, 2, 21 (Qq “shrink).” Mcb. V, 3, 49. 2) to part with: “the eyes f. from their lights,” Lucr. 461. “through her wounds doth f. life's lasting date from cancelled destiny,” Lucr. 461 “f. I hence, I f. away from life,” Gentl. III, 1, 187. 3) to flee from: “so runnest thou after that which --es from thee,” Sonn. 143, 9. Err. III, 2, 160. H5 IV, 1, 177. H6A I, 1, 97. I, 2, 103. I, 5, 32. H6C V, 6, 7. R3 V, 3, 185. Cymb. V, 4, 92. -- b) trans. == 1) to leave, to desert, to avoid: “she would the caged cloister f.” Compl. 249. “f. this place,” Mids. I, 1, 203. Lr. II, 1, 22. “ere thou f. the realm,” R2 I, 3, 198. Mcb. IV, 2, 1. “like the current --es each bound,” Tim. I, 1, 24. “f. pride,” Err. IV, 3, 81. “thou shalt f. him,” Mids. II, 1, 246. As III, 5, 9. All's V, 3, 156. “he'll quickly f. my friendship too,” Cymb. V, 3, 62. 2) to flee from: “f. him when he comes back,” Tp. V, 35. “I f. not death,” Gentl. III, 1, 185. V, 2, 50. Wiv. II, 2, 216. H6A IV, 5, 37. H6C I, 4, 23. R3 III, 2, 28. Cymb. IV, 2, 71.
6) to fall off, to revolt (cf. Cymb. IV, 2, 71 a. 1): “you made in a day whole towns to f.” H6B II, 1, 164. With off: “the images of revolt and --ing off,” Lr. II, 4, 91. “and never f. off our loves again,” Ant. II, 2, 155.
7) to let a falcon rise to pursue its game: “--ing at the brook,” H6B II, 1, 1 (cf. “Brook). we'll e'en to it like French falconers, f. at any thing we see,” Hml. II, 2, 450.
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