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Follow, 1) to go, come or be after; locally and temporally; a) intr.: Ven. 54. Lucr. 186. Tp. I, 2, 464. Tp. I, 2, 464 III, 2, 159. III, 3, 109. Gentl. III, 1, 324. V, 2, 53. Wiv. I, 3, 14. II, 1, 202. IV, 2, 206. Meas. II, 4, 177. III, 1, 259. IV, 2, 58. Ado I, 1, 207. III, 3, 107. LLL I, 1, 207. III, 1, 94. Tw. II, 5, 154. H4A V, 4, 166. H6A III, 2, 59. Hml. II, 2, 432. Oth. IV, 2, 220. Cymb. IV, 2, 387 etc. etc. “I will talk with you, walk with you, and so --ing,” Merch. I, 3, 37 (== and so forth). With after: “which --s after,” Wint. IV, 1, 28. With upon: “it --ed hard upon,” Hml. I, 2, 179. -- b) trans.: Lucr. 357. Tp. I, 2, 393. Tp. I, 2, 393 Tp. I, 2, 393 III, 2, 157. III, 3, 107. IV, 179. Gentl. I, 1, 92. Gentl. I, 1, 92 Gentl. I, 1, 92 V, 2, 48. 50 etc. etc. “whither do you f. your eyes?” Cor. II, 1, 109 (== where are you going?).
2) to pursue, to chase, to prosecute: “to f. that which flies,” Sonn. 143, 7. “Moyses and Valerius f. him,” Gentl. V, 3, 8. “f. no further now,” H4B IV, 3, 27. “they f. us with wings,” H6C II, 3, 12. “f. him, as he hath --ed you, with all despite,” Cor. III, 3, 139. “I have ever --ed thee with hate,” IV, 5, 104. “O Antony, I have --ed thee to this!” Ant. V, 1, 36.
3) to ensue: “to do this deed, promotion --s,” Wint. I, 2, 357. “what --s if we disallow of this?” John I, 16. H5 II, 4, 96. R3 IV, 4, 407. Troil. I, 3, 110. Cymb. III, 3, 69. V, 4, 174.
4) to be the consequence, to result: “it --s not that she will love Sir Thurio,” Gentl. III, 2, 50. All's II, 3, 119. H5 I, 2, 174. R3 I, 1, 59. Cor. II, 1, 69. III, 1, 148. Hml. I, 3, 79. Lr. I, 2, 141. Trans.: “what --s this?” Wint. IV, 4, 376.
5) to observe, to obey, to act up to: “and --s close the rigour of the statute,” Meas. I, 4, 67. I shall f. it (your counsel) II, 1, 267. Merch. I, 2, 12. Merch. I, 2, 12 Merch. I, 2, 12 Wint. II, 1, 162. H4B I, 2, 147. H5 III, 1, 33. H8 III, 2, 243.
6) to be the next thing to be said or done. “then it --s thus: thou shalt be master in my stead,” Shr. I, 1, 206. “this --s: make for Sicilia,” Wint. IV, 4, 553. “well, sir, what --s?” H8 V, 1, 79 (== what is the matter?). “now this --s: Charles the emperor came to whisper Wolsey,” I, 1, 174. “now --s that you know,” Hml. I, 2, 17.
7) to be in consonance, to agree: “the spring is near when green geese are a breeding. How --s that?” LLL I, 1, 98. “to make Judas hang himself. Begin, sir, you are my elder. Well --ed: Judas was hanged on an elder,” V, 2, 610. “how ill it --s, after you have laboured so hard, you should talk so idly,” H4B II, 2, 31. “be not a garment nobler than that it covers: let thy effects so f., to be most unlike our courtiers, as good as promise,” Cymb. V, 4, 136.
8) to attend, to wait on: “she would have --ed her exile,” As I, 1, 114. “does your business f. us?” All's II, 1, 102. “the liberty that --s our places,” H5 V, 2, 297. “heavenly blessings f. such creatures,” H8 II, 3, 58. “how eagerly ye f. my disgraces,” III, 2, 240. “the flatteries that f. youth,” Tim. V, 1, 37. “the love that --s us sometime is our trouble,” Mcb. I, 6, 11.* Intr.: “temptation --s where thou art,” Sonn. 41, 4.
9) to seek after, to court: “you are there --ed by a faithful shepherd,” As V, 2, 87. “I f. him not by any token of presumptuous suit,” All's I, 3, 203. “are they so --ed?” Hml. II, 2, 349.
10) to adhere to, to side with: “we'll f. Cade,” H6B IV, 8, 35. “we'll f. the king,” H6B IV, 8, 35 “we --ed then our lord, our lawful king,” R3 I, 3, 147. “had rather have us win than him they f.” V, 3, 244.
11) to serve; a) intr.: “for a little f. and do me service,” Tp. IV, 267. “I'll f., as they say, for reward,” H4A V, 4, 166 (cf. Gentl. I, 1, 94 and H6B II, 3, 109). “and --s but for form,” Lr. II, 4, 80. b) trans.: “I'll bear him no more sticks, but f. thee,” Tp. II, 2, 167. “a loyal sir to him thou --est,” V, 70. “thou for wages --est thy master,” Gentl. I, 1, 94. “she uses me with a more exalted respect than any one else that --s her,” Tw. II, 5, 32. Troil. III, 1, 2. Lr. I, 1, 143. Ant. V, 2, 151 etc.
12) to pursue, to apply one's self to: “the dire imagination she did f.” Ven. 975. “that I f. thus a losing suit against him,” Merch. IV, 1, 61. Merch. IV, 1, 61 “the justice of thy plea, which if thou f.” Merch. IV, 1, 61 “had I but --ed the arts!” Tw. I, 3, 99. “f. arms,” John II, 31 and H6A II, 1, 43. “f. your function,” Cor. IV, 5, 35. “he will never f. any thing that other men begin,” Caes. II, 1, 151. “assaulted for --ing her affairs,” Lr. II, 2, 157. Ant. I, 4, 10. Cymb. V, 5, 410.
13) to pursue, to continue, to carry through (what is now to follow up): how with a sportful malice it (the device) “was --ed,” Tw. V, 373. “such a day, so fought, so --ed and so fairly won,” H4B I, 1, 21. “'the time shall come', thus did he f. it,” III, 1, 75. “this chase is hotly --ed,” H5 II, 4, 68. “f. me this jest now till thou hast worn out thy pump,” Rom. II, 4, 65.
14) to imitate, to copy: “we have laughed to see the sails conceive and grow big-bellied with the wanton wind; which she, with pretty and with swimming gait, --ing would imitate,” Mids. II, 1, 131. “such another encounter, which lames report to f. it,” Wint. V, 2, 62. “to f. still the changes of the moon,” Oth. III, 3, 178.
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