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Force, vb. 1) to reinforce, to strengthen: “were they not --d with those that should be ours,” Mcb. V, 5, 5.
2) to constrain: “art thou king and wilt be --d?” H6C I, 1, 230. “with much --ing of his disposition,” Hml. III, 1, 12. Followed by an inf. with “to:” Lucr. 261. Sonn. 41, 12. Meas. III, 2, 268. Err. I, 1, 75. Ado V, 1, 64. Shr. III, 2, 8. Wint. I, 2, 52. H4B I, 1, 105. IV, 1, 147. H6C II, 5, 6. H6C II, 5, 6 III, 3, 26. R3 V, 1, 23. H8 III, 2, 430. Cor. I, 6, 19. V, 6, 106. Lr. V, 1, 23. Ant. V, 2, 213. Without to: “rain added to a river will f. it overflow the bank,” Ven. 72. “I'll f. thee yield to my desire,” Gentl. V, 4, 59. “I'll f. the wine peep through their scars,” Ant. III, 13, 190. “this secret will f. him think,” Cymb. II, 2, 41. Followed by a subst. with to: “--d to content,” Ven. 61. “so Lucrece must I f. to my desire,” Lucr. 182. As II, 7, 102. R3 IV, 4, 279 (Ff move). Tit. IV, 1, 72. Ant. V, 1, 56. Cymb. I, 6, 101. Per. III, 3, 22. Partic. --d == constrained, unnatural, false: “that --d thunder from his heart did fly,” Compl. 325. “if thou takest up the princess by that --d baseness which he has put upon it,” Wint. II, 3, 78. “with these --d thoughts darken not the mirth o' the feast,” IV, 4, 41. “'tis like the --d gait of a shuffling nag,” H4A III, 1, 135.
3) to bring about or effect by constraint or violence: “this --d league doth f. a further strife,” Lucr. 689. “which --d such way,” H8 II, 4, 184. “f. their scanted courtesy,” Lr. III, 2, 66. “my --d offence,” Lucr. 1071. “--d stain,” Lucr. 1071 “--d marriage,” Wiv. V, 5, 243 and H6A V, 5, 62. “a visitation --d by need,” Wint. V, 1, 91. “his little kingdom of a --d grave,” John IV, 2, 98. “--d drops of blood,” H5 IV, 1, 314. “a --d affection,” Caes. IV, 3, 205. “--d breath,” Hml. I, 2, 79 (i. e. heavy, panting). “a --d content,” Oth. III, 4, 120. --d even == violent: “deaths put on by cunning and --d cause,” Hml. V, 2, 394. “indirect and --d courses,” Oth. I, 3, 111.
Followed by prepositions or adverbs, == to put or drive or draw by constraint or by an effort: “to f. him after,” Wint. IV, 4, 679. “f. her hence,” II, 3, 61. “it shall not force this lineal honour from me,” H4B IV, 5, 45. H5 IV, 6, 28. H6A IV, 6, 24. H6C III, 3, 206. “--d him on so fast,” Lucr. 1670. “to f. that on you,” Tw. III, 1, 127. “--ing faults upon Hermione,” Wint. III, 1, 16. “--d out,” Tim. I, 2, 208. “f. the letter to my view,” Gentl. I, 2, 54. “could f. his soul so to his own conceit,” Hml. II, 2, 579.
4) to ravish, to violate; absol.: “hot and --ing violation,” H5 III, 3, 21. Trans.: that (viz my mind) “was not --d,” Lucr. 1657. “would have --d your honour and your love,” Gentl. V, 4, 22. “I'll woo you like a soldier . . . and f. ye,” Gentl. V, 4, 22 “to f. a spotless virgin's chastity,” H6B V, 1, 186. “--d in the gloomy woods,” Tit. IV, 1, 53. “her spotless chastity you --d,” V, 2, 178.
5) to urge: “--d examples 'gainst her own content,” Compl. 157. when he would f. it (the law) Meas. III, 1, 110. “if you will now unite in your complaints and f. them with a constancy,” H8 III, 2, 2. “why f. you this?” Cor. III, 2, 51.
6) to value, to care for: “I f. not argument a straw,” Lucr. 1021. “your oath once broke, you f. not to forswear,” LLL V, 2, 440 (cf. Forceless).
7) to farce, to stuff: “f. him with praises,” Troil. II, 3, 232. “wit larded with malice, and malice --d with wit,” V, 1, 64. Perhaps also in H5 II Chor. 32: f. a play; but the passage is evidently corrupt.
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