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Fresh, adj. 1) not faded, not vapid or stale, unimpaired and healthy: “with f. variety,” Ven. 21. “love's gentle spring doth always f. remain,” Ven. 21 “a spreading flower, f. to myself,” Compl. 76. “the f. lap of the crimson rose,” Mids. II, 1, 108. IV, 1, 57. All's V, 3, 327. Tw. I, 1, 31. Wint. I, 2, 420. R2 III, 3, 47. V, 1, 10. Rom. I, 2, 29. Cymb. II, 2, 15. “f. morning drops,” LLL IV, 3, 27. Rom. I, 1, 138. “a --er clime,” R2 I, 3, 285. “--er air,” H8 I, 4, 101. “the f. streams ran by her,” Oth. IV, 3, 45. “how f. she looks,” Per. III, 2, 79. “f. days of love,” Mids. V, 29.
2) not yet used, untouched, not worn off: our garments are now as f. as when we put them “on first,” Tp. II, 1, 68. Tp. II, 1, 68 102; cf. I, 2, 219. “a withered serving-man a f. tapster,” Wiv. I, 3, 19. “ever your f. whore and your powdered bawd,” Meas. III, 2, 62. “cannot use such vigilance as when they are f.” Tp. III, 3, 17. “they all are f.” H5 IV, 3, 4. H5 IV, 3, 4. V, 6, 20. Cor. V, 6, 35. “thus did I keep my person f.” H4A III, 2, 55. “f. and stainless youth,” Tw. I, 5, 278.
3) full of new life and vigour: “'tis f. morning with me,” Tp. III, 1, 33. “cast thy humble slough and appear f.” Tw. II, 5, 162; cf. H5 IV, 1, 23. “thy friendship makes us f.” H6A III, 3, 86. Cymb. I, 5, 42.
4) brisk, lively, full of alacrity: “the fair sun, when in his f. array,” Ven. 483. “O spirit of love, how quick and f. art thou,” Tw. I, 1, 9. “f. as a bridegroom,” H4A I, 3, 34. Troil. IV, 4, 147. “in appointment f. and fair,” IV, 5, 1. “look f. and merrily,” Caes. II, 1, 224. “I am f. of spirit,” V, 1, 91.
5) youthful, florid, in the prime of life: “f. beauty,” Ven. 164. “that f. fair mirror, dim and old,” Lucr. 1760. “the world's f. ornament,” Sonn. I, 9. “my love looks f.” 107, 10. “since first I saw you f.” 104, 8. “Adonis, lovely, f. and green,” Pilgr. 44. “these f. nymphs,” Tp. IV, 137. Gentl. V, 4, 115. LLL IV, 3, 28. Mids. III, 2, 97; cf. H4A II, 3, 47. As III, 5, 29. Shr. IV, 5, 29. Shr. IV, 5, 29 Wint. I, 1, 44. IV, 4, 433. IV, 4, 433 H5 III, 3, 14. Tim. IV, 3, 385. Oth. II, 3, 20. III, 3, 386.
6) new: “to seek some --er stamp of the time-bettering days,” Sonn. 82, 8. “f. and new,” Wiv. IV, 5, 9. “f. array,” As IV, 3, 144; cf. All's V, 2, 4; H5 IV, 2, 57; IV, 3, 117. Lr. IV, 7, 22; Per. V, 1, 216. “f. in murmur,” Tw. I, 2, 32. “f. horses,” Wint. III, 1, 21. John IV, 2, 7. H4A II, 4, 200. H6C III, 3, 237. Troil. II, 3, 272. Cor. V, 3, 17. Tit. III, 1, 111. Mcb. I, 2, 33. Oth. II, 1, 231. III, 3, 179. Cymb. V, 2, 16. Per. IV, 2, 10.
7) refreshing: “the emerald, in whose f. regard weak sights their sickly radiance do amend,” Compl. 213. “under a f. tree's shade,” H6C II, 5, 49. “f. cups, soft beds,” Cymb. V, 3, 71.
8) unripe, inexperienced: “how green you are and f. in this old world,” John III, 4, 145. cf. Fresh-new.
9) holding good, unchanging, constant: “the --est things now reigning,” Wint. IV, 1, 13. “ever since a f. admirer of what I saw,” H8 I, 1, 3. “that slander is found a truth now, for it grows again --er than e'er it was,” II, 1, 155. “'tis so lately altered, that the old name is f. about me,” IV, 1, 99. “whose remembrance is yet f. in their grief,” Cymb. II, 4, 15.
10) not salt: “the petty streams that pay a daily debt to their salt sovereign, with their f. falls' haste,” Lucr. 650. Tp. I, 2, 160. Tp. I, 2, 160 Wiv. I, 1, 22. Tw. III, 4, 419 (quibbling). H5 I, 2, 209. Tit. III, 1, 128.
Adverbially: “bleeding f.” H6B III, 2, 188.
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