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Friend, subst. one joined to another in benevolence and intimacy; masc.: Tp. I, 2, 488. II, 1, 290. II, 1, 290 II, 2, 95. II, 2, 95 V, 120. Gentl. I, 1, 59. I, 3, 54. V, 4, 54 etc. etc. fem.: Wiv. III, 3, 146. III, 4, 93. Err. V, 414. Mids. III, 2, 216. H6A II, 1, 54 etc. it “is a hard matter for --s to meet,” As III, 2, 195 (allusion to the proverb: “friends may meet, but mountains never greet). a f. i' the court is better than a penny in purse,” H4B V, 1, 34. “you cannot tell who's your f.” Tp. II, 2, 89. “nature thy f.” Wiv. III, 3, 70. “good expedition be my f.” Wint. I, 2, 458. Lr. IV, 6, 262. Cymb. I, 6, 18. “stand these poor people's f.” H8 IV, 2, 157. With “to:” Sonn. 144, 11. H6A I, 3, 25 etc. at f. == on terms of friendship: “all greetings that a king at f. can send his brother,” Wint. V, 1, 140 (F2. Wint. V, 1, 140 4 as f.). to f. == for f.: “you have them ill to f.” All's V, 3, 182. “we shall have him well to f.” Caes. III, 1, 143. “as I shall find the time to f.” Mcb. IV, 3, 10. “had I admittance and opportunity to f.” Cymb. I, 4, 116. to be f. with: “France f. with England,” John III, 1, 35. Oftener to be --s: “you'll never be --s with him,” LLL V, 2, 13. LLL V, 2, 13 “I would be --s with you,” Merch. I, 3, 139. H4B II, 4, 71. H5 II, 1, 107. IV, 8, 65. H6C IV, 1, 115. Caes. III, 1, 220. Lr. IV, 1, 37. Ant. II, 5, 44. Ant. II, 5, 44 Cymb. I, 1, 105. “I am good --s with my father,” H4A III, 3, 203. “to-night all --s,” Troil. IV, 5, 270. “I will hold --s with you,” Ado I, 1, 91. “that she make --s to the strict deputy,” Meas. I, 2, 185 (== gain his friendship). “make --s, invite,” Shr. III, 2, 16 (some M. Edd. make feasts, invite friends). H8 II, 1, 127. Adjectively: Caes. V, 3, 18.
Used for near relations, particularly parents: “he leaves his --s to dignify them more,” Gentl. I, 1, 64. II, 4, 123. “she is promised by her --s unto a gentleman,” III, 1, 106. “a dower remaining in the coffer of her --s,” Meas. I, 2, 155. “if we did derive it from our --s,” As I, 3, 64. “'tis doubt whether our kinsman come to see his --s,” R2 I, 4, 22. “young, strong, and of good --s,” H4B III, 2, 114. “thou art no father nor no f. of mine,” H6A V, 4, 9. “you envy my advancement and my --s',” R3 I, 3, 75. “at their --s doors,” Tit. V, 1, 136.
Synonymous to lover, paramour, sweetheart; masc.: “if you have a f. here, convey him out,” Wiv. III, 3, 124. “I will never love that which my f. hates,” Ado V, 2, 72. “to be naked with her f. in bed,” Oth. IV, 1, 3. “from Egypt drive her all-disgraced f.” Ant. III, 12, 22. “I profess myself her adorer, not her f.” Cymb. I, 4, 74. fem.: “he hath got his f. with child,” Meas. I, 4, 29. “never come in vizard to my f.” LLL V, 2, 404.
Used as a familiar compellation: Wiv. III, 1, 2. Shr. I, 2, 190. Ant. III, 5, 1 etc.
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