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Fall, vb. (impf. fell; partic. usually fallen, f. i. Ven. 354. Tp. II, 1, 181. Meas. II, 4, 178. Ado IV, 1, 141. Mids. III, 2, 417. Merch. IV, 1, 266. As III, 5, 66. V, 4, 182. Shr. IV, 1, 57. All's V, 1, 12 etc. Three times “fell:” Tit. II, 4, 50. Tim. IV, 3, 265. Lr. IV, 6, 54). A) intr. 1) to drop from a higher place: Ven. 314. Ven. 314 Ven. 314 Lucr. 1139. Pilgr. 136. Tp. II, 2, 24. IV, 1, 18. Gentl. I, 2, 73. Err. I, 2, 37. Ado IV, 1, 141. Mids. II, 1, 90. Mids. II, 1, 90 Mids. II, 1, 90 Shr. IV, 1, 57. Tw. V, 247. R2 II, 1, 153. H6B III, 2, 412 (this way f. I to death; i. e. so as to die). H8 IV, 1, 55; cf. Ant. IV, 14, 106. H8 I, 1, 203. Rom. V, 1, 62 “(f. dead).” Tim. IV, 3, 265. Lr. IV, 6, 54 etc. etc. Used of the foot, == to tread: “that the blind mole may not hear a foot f.” Tp. IV, 195. “though he go as softly as foot can f.” As III, 2, 346. Of the coming down of a sword: “an it had not --en flatlong,” Tp. II, 1, 181. Mcb. V, 8, 11.
2) to drop from an erect posture: Ven. 719. Tp. II, 1, 203. II, 2, 16. Gentl. V, 4, 9; cf. Ant. I, 1, 34. Err. V, 114. Ado II, 3, 152. Mids. III, 2, 25. 417 etc. etc.
3) to disembogue: “there --s into thy boundless flood black lust, dishonour,” Lucr. 653.
4) to sink, to decrease, to decay: “her price is --en,” Lr. I, 1, 200. “a good leg will f.” H5 V, 2, 167. With away: “am I not --en away vilely since this last action?” H4A III, 3, 1. “till bones and flesh and sinews f. away,” H6A III, 1, 193. And with off: “what a --ing off was there!” Hml. I, 5, 47 (== what a change for the worse).
5) to be degraded or destroyed, to perish: Sonn. 151, 12. Meas. II, 1, 38. John III, 4, 139. H6A II, 5, 90. III, 1, 174. H6B III, 1, 22. H8 IV, 1, 55. Hml. I, 1, 114. Ant. III, 13, 44 etc. == to be slain: All's III, 1, 22. H4B Ind. All's III, 1, 22 Rom. III, 1, 179. Cymb. III, 3, 91. V, 4, 72 etc.
6) to depart from the path of virtue, to sin: Compl. 321. Meas. II, 1, 18. II, 3, 11. II, 4, 178. III, 1, 191. H4A III, 3, 186. Rom. II, 3, 80.
7) to be brought forth: “the eanlings should f. as Jacob's hire,” Merch. I, 3, 81. “that their burthens may not f. this day,” John III, 1, 90.
8) to rush with violence: “they fell on,” H8 V, 4, 56. “all the dukes f. upon the king,” Meas. I, 2, 3. “they fell upon me, bound me,” Err. V, 246. “tear me, take me, and the gods f. upon you,” Tim. III, 4, 100. Caes. V, 1, 81. Ant. II, 2, 75.
9) to come, to get: “f. to decay,” Sonn. 13, 9. “it will f. to cureless ruin,” Merch. IV, 1, 141. “in twenty pieces,” Rom. II, 5, 50. “grieve not that I am --en to this for you,” Merch. IV, 1, 266. “to f. before the lion,” Tw. III, 1, 140 (== to meet the lion). “how fell you besides your five wits?” IV, 2, 92. “you f. 'mongst friends,” Cymb. III, 6, 75. “he fell to himself again,” H8 II, 1, 35 (== he came to himself). “which --s into mine ears as profitless as water in a sieve,” Ado V, 1, 4; cf. “the repetition, in a woman's ear, would murder as it fell,” Mcb. II, 3, 91; and: “what a strange infection is --en into thy ear?” Cymb. III, 2, 4. “--s into forfeit,” Meas. I, 4, 66. “into the cinque pace,” Ado II, 1, 82. “into a cough,” Mids. II, 1, 54. “into revelry,” As V, 4, 183. “into dreams,” Shr. Ind. 2, 128. “into abatement,” Tw. I, 1, 13. “into thy hand,” II, 5, 155. “into apoplexy,” H4B I, 2, 123. H4B I, 2, 123 “into revolt,” IV, 5, 66. “into a slower method,” R3 I, 2, 116. “in broil,” Cor. III, 1, 33. “into the sear,” Mcb. V, 3, 23. “in fright,” Oth. II, 3, 232. “into such vile success,” III, 3, 222. “fell in praise of our country mistresses,” Cymb. I, 4, 61. “to f. asleep,” Sonn. 153, 1. H4A III, 3, 112. Tit. II, 4, 50 (cf. “Asleep). to f. in love:” Gentl. I, 2, 2. Ado II, 3, 12. As I, 2, 26. “to f. in love with:” Ado II, 1, 396. V, 2, 61. As III, 5, 66. As III, 5, 66 Cor. I, 5, 22 etc. (cf. “Love). f. into so strong a liking with Rowland's son,” As I, 3, 27. “if he f. in rage with their refusal,” Corr. II, 3, 266.
10) to become: “she fell distract,” Caes. IV, 3, 155. “shall we f. foul for toys?” H4B II, 4, 183 (== quarrel; Pistol's speech). “f. mad,” Tit. II, 3, 104. “f. sick,” Sonn. 118, 14. Merch. III, 4, 71. H8 IV, 2, 15. “at jars,” H6B I, 1, 253.
11) to begin, to get into; followed by the gerund: “nature, as she wrought thee, fell a doting,” Sonn. 20, 10. “she fell a turning,” Pilgr. 100. “the people f. a hooting,” LLL IV, 2, 61. “he --s a capering,” Merch. I, 2, 65. “my nose fell a bleeding,” II, 5, 24. “the people fell a shouting,” Caes. I, 2, 222. “f. a cursing,” Hml. II, 2, 615.
12) to happen, to come to pass: “as it fell upon a day,” Pilgr. 373. “if anything f. to you upon this, more than thanks and good fortune,” Meas. IV, 2, 190. “it will f. pat as I told you,” Mids. V, 188. “an the worst f. that ever fell,” Merch. I, 2, 96. “as the matter --s,” III, 2, 204. “whate'er --s more,” All's V, 1, 37. “howe'er the matter f.” V, 3, 121. “this sudden mischief never could have --en,” H6A II, 1, 59. “an ensuing evil, if it f., greater than this,” H8 II, 1, 141. “my misgiving still --s shrewdly to the purpose,” Caes. III, 1, 146. “I know not what may f.” Caes. III, 1, 146 “for fear of what might f.” V, 1, 105. “it --s right,” Hml. IV, 7, 71. “there's --en between him and my lord an unkind breach,” Oth. IV, 1, 237.
13) Followed by to, == a) to begin, to get into: “with measure heaped in joy, to the measures f.” As V, 4, 185. “but you f. to some discord,” H4B II, 4, 61. “f. to thy prayers,” V, 5, 51. “makes me from wondering f. to weeping joys,” H6B I, 1, 34. “f. to blows,” II, 3, 80. “fell so roundly to a large confession,” Troil. III, 2, 161. “his soldiers fell to spoil,” Caes. V, 3, 7. “he --s to such perusal of my face,” Hml. II, 1, 90. “before you f. to play,” V, 2, 216. “f. to quarrel,” Lr. IV, 6, 37. “may f. to match you with her country forms,” Oth. III, 3, 237. -- b) to lay hands on, to assail: as he (Mars) fell to her (Venus), so fell she to him (Adonis), Pilgr. 146. “f. to their throats,” Ant. II, 7, 78. Hence c) to apply one's self: f. to them (mathematics) “as you find your stomach serves you,” Shr. I, 1, 38. f. to it == be busy, be not idle: Tp. I, 1, 3. “if we be forbidden stones, we'll f. to it with our teeth,” H6A III, 1, 90. so f. to it == help yourself, eat: Tim. I, 2, 71. f. to, in the same sense: As II, 7, 171. R2 V, 5, 98. H5 V, 1, 38. Tit. III, 2, 34. -- d) to become the share of: “since this fortune --s to you,” Merch. III, 2, 134. “to each of you one fair and virtuous mistress f.” All's II, 3, 64. “from her will f. some blessing to this land,” H8 III, 2, 51. “his fell to Hamlet,” Hml. I, 1, 95. cf. new-fallen == recently fallen to the share of a person: As V, 4, 182. H4A V, 1, 44. -- e) to become subject to: “when majesty --s to folly,” Lr. I, 1, 151 (Qq stoops). “f. to reprobation,” Oth. V, 2, 209.
14) Followed by from, a) to forsake, to quit the party of: “f. from this faith,” Ado I, 1, 257. “I will f. from thee,” John III, 1, 320. H6C III, 3, 209. -- b) to become a stranger to, to lose: “that you are not --en from the report that goes upon your goodness,” All's V, 1, 12. “--en from favour,” H8 III, 1, 20. “and be not from his reason --en thereon,” Hml. II, 2, 165.
15) Followed by on, a) used of evils, == to come down, to light: “all the infections . . . on Prosper f.” Tp. II, 2, 2. III, 3, 80. “a blasting breath to f. on him,” Meas. V, 122. “her death shall f. heavy on you,” Ado V, 1, 150. Merch. III, 1, 89. All's I, 1, 79. R2 IV, 147. H4A V, 5, 13. R3 III, 3, 15. V, 1, 14. Mcb. IV, 1, 105. IV, 3, 227. Oth. I, 3, 120. -- b) of benign influences, == to bless: “all comfort may hourly f. upon you,” H8 V, 5, 8. “for which the people's prayers still f. upon you,” Per. III, 3, 19. -- c) to become the share of, to be enjoyed by: “seeing thou --est on me so luckily,” H4A V, 4, 33 (== becomest my prey). “such a flood of greatness fell on you,” V, 1, 48. “what in me was purchased, --s upon thee in a fairer sort,” H4B IV, 5, 201. “the victory fell on us,” Mcb. I, 2, 58. “the sovereignty will f. upon Macbeth,” II, 4, 30. “preferment --s on him that cuts him off,” Lr. IV, 5, 38. -- d) Peculiar use: “and f. on my side so,” H6A II, 4, 51 (== leave your party for mine).
16) Joined with adverbs: “mortals that f. back to gaze on him,” Rom. II, 2, 30 (== to bend back). “though we here f. down, we have supplies to second our attempt,” H4B IV, 2, 44 (== to get the worse). to f. away (cf. def. 4) == to forsake, to leave a party: “f. away like water from ye,” H8 II, 1, 129. “Canidius and the rest that fell away,” Ant. IV, 6, 17. to f. from, in the same sense: “the --ing from of his friends,” Tim. IV, 3, 401. to f. off == a) to keep far, to stay behind: “fell off a distance from her,” H8 IV, 1, 64. b) to prove faithless: “inconstancy --s off ere it begins,” Gentl. V, 4, 113. “he never did f. off,” H4A I, 3, 94. “friendship --s off,” Lr. I, 2, 116. John V, 5, 11. Tim. V, 1, 62. Cymb. III, 7, 6. (cf. def. 4). -- to f. in == to join, to be on friendly terms: “let's f. in with them,” H6B IV, 2, 32. “after he once fell in with Mistress Shore,” R3 III, 5, 51. “--ing in, after --ing out,” Troil. III, 1, 112. -- to f. over == to go over, to desert to: “dost thou now f. over to my foes?” John III, 1, 127. -- to f. out == a) to fall at odds, to quarrel: Mids. IV, 1, 55. Shr. IV, 1, 57. All's IV, 5, 61. R3 I, 3, 158. Troil. III, 1, 93. Troil. III, 1, 93 III, 3, 75. Cor. IV, 3, 34. Rom. I, 3, 32. III, 1, 29. Hml. II, 1, 59. Lr. II, 2, 92. II, 4, 111. Cymb. V, 4, 32. b) to come to pass: Meas. II, 4, 117. Ado IV, 1, 219. Mids. III, 2, 35. IV, 2, 32. Merch. II, 5, 26. John IV, 2, 154. R3 III, 2, 66. Cor. II, 1, 259. Rom. III, 4, 1. Hml. II, 2, 127. III, 1, 16. Oth. II, 3, 231. IV, 2, 242. Cymb. I, 4, 61. d) to turn out, to prove: “their events can never f. out good,” R2 II, 1, 214. “if all things f. out right,” H6A II, 3, 4. “wishes f. out as they're willed,” Per. V, 2, 16.
B) trans. 1) to let fall, to drop: “every tear he --s,” Lucr. 1551. Tp. V, 64. R2 III, 4, 104 (Ff Q2. 3 drop). R3 I, 3, 354 (Qq drop). Oth. IV, 1, 257. Ant. III, 11, 69. to f. it (your hand) “on Gonzalo,” Tp. II, 1, 296. As III, 5, 5. R3 V, 3, 135. R3 V, 3, 135 “rather cut a little, than f. and bruise to death,” Meas. II, 1, 6. “f. a drop of water in the breaking gulf,” Err. II, 2, 127. “her mantle she did f.” Mids. V, 143. “--ing a lip of much contempt,” Wint. I, 2, 372. “f. his crest,” Troil. I, 3, 379. Caes. IV, 2, 26.
2) to bring forth: “f. parti-coloured lambs,” Merch. I, 3, 89.
3) to befall, to happen to: “fair f. the wit that can so well defend her,” Ven. 472. LLL II, 125. John I, 78. “no disgrace shall f. you for refusing him at sea,” Ant. III, 7, 40.
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