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False, adj. 1) not true: “that sometime true news, sometime f. doth bring,” Ven. 658. Gentl. IV, 2, 107. Meas. V, 156. Meas. V, 156 Err. V, 179. Err. V, 179 Err. V, 179 Ado V, 1, 219. All's V, 3, 229 (the story goes f.). H4B Ind. All's V, 3, 229 H6B I, 3, 158. Caes. II, 2, 63. Ant. II, 1, 18 etc.
2) not right, wrong, erroneous: “f. alarms,” Ven. 651. “with f. bethinking,” Ven. 651 “a f. esteem,” Sonn. 127, 12. “f. compare,” 130, 14. “a f. interpreter,” Gentl. I, 2, 78. “f. and most contrarious quests,” Meas. IV, 1, 62. “his conceit is f.” Ado II, 1, 309. “a f. gallop,” III, 4, 94; cf. As III, 2, 119. “f.; we have given thee faces,” LLL V, 2, 625. “I smell f. Latin,” V, 1, 83; cf. “my f. French,” H5 V, 2, 236. “f. reckonings,” As III, 4, 35. “play f. strains upon thee,” IV, 3, 68; cf. “the strings are f.” Caes. IV, 3, 292. “with f. aim,” All's III, 2, 113. “a f. conclusion,” Tw. II, 3, 6. “on the f. trail,” Hml. IV, 5, 109. “f., f.; this, this,” Ant. IV, 4, 7 etc.
3) not real: “to worship shadows and adore f. shapes,” Gentl. IV, 2, 131. “a dagger of the mind, a f. creation,” Mcb. II, 1, 38. “frighted with f. fire,” Hml. III, 2, 277.
4) not genuine: “why should f. painting imitate his cheek,” Sonn. 67, 5. “f. art,” 68, 14. 127, 6. to put metal in restrained means and make a f. one (viz life) Meas. II, 4, 49. “f. prints,” Meas. II, 4, 49 “ravish doters with a f. aspect,” LLL IV, 3, 260. “to bring f. generations,” Wint. II, 1, 148. “f. coin,” H8 III, 1, 171. “f. dice,” Ado II, 1, 290. Wint. I, 2, 132.
5) misrepresenting the truth, deceitful: “why should others' f. adulterate eyes give salutation to my sportive blood?” Sonn. 121, 5; cf. 148, 5; “millions of f. eyes are stuck upon thee,” Meas. IV, 1, 60. “with f. sorrow's eye,” R2 II, 2, 26. “I do despise one that is f.” Wiv. I, 1, 70 (Evans' speech); cf. “affection makes him f.” Rom. III, 1, 182 (or vb.?). “thy f. seeming,” Meas. II, 4, 15. “the f. sweet bait that we lay,” Ado III, 1, 33. “words are grown so f.” Tw. III, 1, 28. “f. witness,” H6B III, 1, 168. “she is fooled with a most f. effect,” Cymb I, 5, 43
6) inconstant (especially in love), faithless: “fickle, f. and full of fraud,” Ven. 1141. Sonn. 20, 4. Sonn. 20, 4 109, 1. Pilgr. 90. Tp. I, 2, 77. Tp. I, 2, 77 Gentl. II, 4, 197. IV, 2, 95. IV, 4, 110. IV, 4, 110 V, 4, 35. Wiv. II, 2, 305. Err. II, 2, 139. III, 2, 8. IV, 4, 104. LLL V, 2, 783. Mids. I, 1, 174. As III, 5, 73. Wint. IV, 4, 151. “as f. as air, as water, wind, or sandy earth,” Troil. III, 2, 198. “f. as water,” Oth. V, 2, 134 etc. With “to:” Sonn. 41, 14. Gentl. IV, 2, 1. LLL V, 2, 782. R3 IV, 4, 207. V, 1, 15. Cor. III, 2, 15. Lr. V, 3, 134. Oth. V, 2, 142. Ant. I, 3, 29. Cymb. III, 4, 42 etc. to be f. with == a) to deceive one: “and I the truer, so to be f. with her,” Cymb. I, 5, 44. b) to commit adultery with: “she f. with Cassio!” Oth. V, 2, 182. “let her beauty look through a casement to allure f. hearts and be f. with them,” Cymb. II, 4, 35.
7) not to be depended on, not to be trusted; a) cowardly: “cowards, whose hearts are all as f. as stairs of sand,” Merch. III, 2, 83. “I am no fighter: I am f. of heart that way,” Wint. IV, 3, 116. b) dishonest: “f. desire,” Lucr. 2. “rash f. heat,” Lucr. 2 “without f. vantage or base treachery,” Gentl. IV, 1, 29. “pay with falsehood f. exacting,” Meas. III, 2, 295. “in a f. quarrel there is no true valour,” Ado V, 1, 120. “to fashion this f. sport,” Mids. III, 2, 194.
Substantively: “my f. o'erweighs your true,” Meas. II, 4, 170. “from f. to f.” Troil. III, 2, 197.
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