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Fashion, subst. 1) the make or form, shape: “the fineness of the gold and chargeful f.” Err. IV, 1, 29. Especially of articles of dress: “the f. of his hat,” Ado I, 1, 76. cf. II, 3, 18. III, 3, 125. III, 3, 125 III, 3, 125 III, 4, 23. Shr. IV, 3, 130. Lr. III, 6, 84. “what f. shall I make your breeches?” Gentl. II, 7, 49. Gentl. II, 7, 49 “your gown 's a most rare f.” Ado III, 4, 15. Tw. II, 5, 219. III, 4, 417.
2) external appearance in general: “when sighs and groans and tears may grace the f. of her disgrace,” Lucr. 1319. “that thou but leadest this f. of thy malice to the last hour of act,” Merch. IV, 1, 18. “'tis some odd humour pricks him to this f.” Shr. III, 2, 75. “I will deeply put the f. on,” H4B V, 2, 52. “I scorn thee and thy f.” H6A II, 4, 76 (viz thy adorning thyself with a red rose). “I will, or let me lose the f. of a man,” H8 IV, 2, 159. “set a fair f. on our entertainment,” Tim. I, 2, 152. “puts him thus from f. of himself,” Hml. III, 1, 183.
3) way, manner: “as is false women's f.” Sonn. 20, 4. “I heard your guilty rhymes, observed your f.” LLL IV, 3, 139. “it is my f.” Shr. II, 230. H4B II, 4, 60. Caes. IV, 3, 135. “after his unpolished f.” LLL IV, 2, 19. Caes. I, 2, 180. I, 3, 34. Ant. IV, 15, 87. “in the same f.” Tp. V, 8. Wiv. III, 4, 83. LLL V, 2, 794. Troil. I, 3, 178. Cor. I, 1, 281. Hml. I, 3, 111. “what f. will you wear the garland of?” Ado II, 1, 195. “why doest thou garter up thy arms a this f.?” All's II, 3, 265 (M. Edd. o' this f.). “Alexander looked o' this f.” Hml. V, 1, 219 (Qq a this f.). “upon this f.” As I, 1, 2. “this shepherd's passion is much upon my f.” II, 4, 62. “two and two, Newgate f.” H4A III, 3, 104.
4) kind, sort: “thou friend of an ill f.” Gentl. V, 4, 61. “which 'longs to women of all f.” Wint. III, 2, 105. “gentlemen of all --s,” Per. IV, 2, 84. “this reasoning is not in the f. to choose me a husband,” Merch. I, 2, 23 (i. e. not of a kind, not well suited to etc. Ff in f.).
5) custom, prevailing practice: “the pretty babes, that mourned for f., ignorant what to fear,” Err. I, 1, 74. “the f. of the world is to avoid cost,” Ado I, 1, 97. Wiv. III, 3, 183. As II, 1, 56. II, 3, 59. Epil. II, 3, 59 Shr. III, 1, 80. H5 V, 2, 284. H5 V, 2, 284 H5 V, 2, 284 H6B I, 3, 46. Troil. V, 2, 196. Caes. V, 5, 5. Lr. III, 4, 74. Particularly the prevailing mode of dress or ornament: Ado III, 3, 140 etc. LLL IV, 3, 262. Shr. IV, 3, 95. All's I, 2, 63. R2 II, 1, 21. H4B III, 2, 340. V, 1, 89. R3 I, 2, 258. Caes. IV, 1, 39. “out of f.” All's I, 1, 170. Troil. III, 3, 152. Cymb. III, 4, 53.
6) that which good breeding requires, the tastes and usages of good society (der gute Ton): “thralled discontent, whereto the inviting time our f. calls,” Sonn. 124, 8. “long agone I have forgot the court; besides, the f. of the time is changed,” Gentl. III, 1, 86. “to be so odd and from all --s,” Ado III, 1, 72. “a man in all the world's new f. planted,” LLL I, 1, 165. “--'s own knight,” LLL I, 1, 165 “for f. sake, I thank you,” As III, 2, 271 (pro forma). “though it appear a little out of f., there is much care and valour in this Welshman,” H5 IV, 1, 85. “wit would be out of f.” Troil. II, 3, 226. “wars and lechery: nothing else holds f.” V, 2, 196. “for Hamlet and the trifling of his favour, hold it a f. and a toy in blood,” Hml. I, 3, 6. Hml. I, 3, 6 “these are now the f.” II, 2, 357. “the appurtenance of welcome is f. and ceremony,” II, 2, 357 “the glass of f. and the mould of form,” III, 1, 161. “I prattle out of f.” Oth. II, 1, 208.
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