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Fetch, vb. 1) to go and bring: Tp. I, 2, 228. V, 32. V, 32 Meas. V, 253. Meas. V, 253 Err. I, 2, 74. II, 1, 75. III, 1, 84. LLL III, 50. As II, 2, 17. Shr. Ind. 1, 11. Tw. IV, 2, 126. R3 II, 2, 121 (Ff fet) etc. “to f. a p. sth.:” Ado II, 1, 274. Ado II, 1, 274 Mids. II, 1, 133. Mids. II, 1, 133 III, 1, 161. IV, 1, 40. Shr. Ind. 2, 51 etc. Absolutely: “she can f. and carry,” Gentl. III, 1, 274. “to f. down:” Gentl. III, 1, 40. H6C II, 6, 52. “to f. in:” Tp. I, 2, 312. Tp. I, 2, 312 II, 2, 185. Shr. IV, 1, 142. “to f. off:” Tp. IV, 213. All's III, 6, 20. All's III, 6, 20 Tw. I, 5, 114. Cor. I, 4, 62. “to f. out:” Meas. IV, 3, 36. Err. V, 157. “to f. up:” As III, 3, 2. Ant. IV, 15, 35.
2) to call for, to come to attend: “to f. you to church,” Ado III, 4, 102. “to f. him,” Caes. II, 1, 212. “I come to f. you to the senate-house,” II, 2, 59. II, 2, 59 to f. in == to go to meet, to attend with solemnity: “go forth and f. their conquering Caesar in,” H5 V Chor. H5 V Chor.
3) to derive, to draw as from a source: “think you I can a resolution f. from flowery tenderness?” Meas. III, 1, 82. “all the treasons f. from false Mowbray their first head and spring,” R2 I, 1, 97. “they will be kin to us, or they will f. it from Japhet,” H4B II, 2, 128. “forms being --ed from glistering semblances of piety,” H5 II, 2, 116. “I f. my life and being from men of royal siege,” Oth. I, 2, 21.
4) to draw forth, to heave: “thy hounds shall f. shrill echoes from the hollow earth,” Shr. Ind. 2, 48. “as she --ed breath,” Pilgr. 153. Per. I, 4, 15. “how hard he --es breath,” H4A II, 4, 579. “--es her wind so short,” Troil. III, 2, 33. “--es her breath as short,” Troil. III, 2, 33
5) to recover, to deliver: “whose credit could f. your brother from the manacles of the all-building law,” Meas. II, 4, 93. cf. “f. off,” Tp. IV, 213. All's III, 6, 20. All's III, 6, 20 Cor. I, 4, 62.
6) to make, to take (speaking of motions): “--ing mad bounds,” Merch. V, 73. “I'll f. a turn about the garden,” Cymb. I, 1, 81. Intr. to f. about == to turn, to veer round: “like a shifted wind unto a sail, it makes the course of thoughts to f. about,” John IV, 2, 24.
7) With in, == a) to apprehend, to seize, to take prisoner: “within our files there are enough to f. him in,” Ant. IV, 1, 14. “and swear he 'ld f. us in,” Cymb. IV, 2, 141. b) to take in, to dupe: “you speak this to f. me in,” Ado I, 1, 225.
8) With off, == a) to make away with: “will f. off Bohemia,” Wint. I, 2, 334. b) to fleece, to make a prey of: “as I return, I will f. off these justices,” H4B III, 2, 324.
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