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Fierce, 1) savage, furious: Sonn. 19, 3. 23, 3. Mids. III, 2, 325. John I, 17. II, 68. IV, 1, 74. IV, 1, 74 V, 2, 158. R2 II, 1, 173. V, 5, 110. H5 III, 3, 23. R3 I, 2, 71. Troil. V, 5, 6. Cor. I, 10, 27. Tit. II, 3, 165. Rom. V, 3, 38. Caes. II, 2, 19. III, 1, 263. Lr. II, 4, 175. III, 7, 57. Per. V, 3, 88.
2) passionate, wild, impetuous: “there is no following her in this f. vein,” Mids. III, 2, 82. “such temperate order in so f. a cause,” John III, 4, 12. “f. extremes in their continuance will not feel themselves,” V, 7, 13. “his rash f. blaze of riot,” R2 II, 1, 33. “in f. tempest is he coming,” H5 II, 4, 99 (dissyll.?). “such f. alarums both of hope and fear,” H6A V, 5, 85. “yet have I f. affections,” Ant. I, 5, 17.
3) wild, disordered, irregular: “think no more of this night's accidents but as the f. vexation of a dream,” Mids. IV, 1, 74. “this f. abridgment hath to it circumstantial branches,” Cymb. V, 5, 382. “the like precurse of f. events,” Hml. I, 1, 121.
4) immoderate, excessive: “what had he to do in these f. vanities,” H8 I, 1, 54. “the f. wretchedness that glory brings us,” Tim. IV, 2, 30.
5) fiery, ardent, strenuous: “with all the f. endeavour of your wit,” LLL V, 2, 863; cf. “would beget opinion of my more f. endeavour,” Lr. II, 1, 36. “f. to their skill, and to their fierceness valiant,” Troil. I, 1, 8. “not f. and terrible only in strokes,” Cor. I, 4, 57. “take more composition and f. quality,” Lr. I, 2, 12. Perhaps in this sense, but more probably in that of the French fier, proud, from which it is derived, in H6B IV, 9, 45: he is f. and cannot brook hard language.
Adverbially: “England his approaches makes as f. as waters,” H5 II, 4, 9. “midday sun f. bent against their faces,” H6A I, 1, 14 (as if it came from fire; cf. def. 5).
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