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Greet, 1) to salute, to take courteous notice of in meeting and passing: “and scarcely g. me,” Sonn. 49, 6. “never stays to g. him,” As II, 1, 54. “not a friend g. my poor corpse,” Tw. II, 4, 62. “g. him not,” Troil. III, 3, 52.
2) to meet and address with kind wishes: “other of our friends will g. us here anon,” Meas. IV, 5, 13. “to g. me with premeditated lines,” Mids. V, 94. Shr. IV, 1, 115. Wint. V, 1, 155. R2 I, 3, 52. III, 2, 10. H4B IV, 1, 228. H6A V, 4, 94. H6B V, 1, 14. R3 III, 1, 17. IV, 1, 4. Troil. II, 3, 189. III, 1, 162. Tim. V, 1, 139. Mcb. I, 2, 65. I, 3, 55. Per. V, 1, 10.
3) to send compliments to; either in writing: “that unworthy wife that --eth thee,” Lucr. 1304. “to g. it with my lays,” Sonn. 102, 6. “to g. your lord with writing,” Cymb. I, 6, 206. Or through a messenger: “your brother kindly --s you,” Meas. I, 4, 24. “--s you from himself by me,” Wint. V, 1, 181. “my mother --s me kindly,” All's II, 4, 1. cf. Merch. IV, 1, 120. John I, 1, 2. Tim. V, 1, 132. Hml. IV, 4, 1. Oth. I, 2, 36. IV, 1, 231. Cymb. I, 6, 13. “he --s me well,” H4B III, 2, 69 and Caes. IV, 2, 6 (a phrase of thanks in return of a salutation; cf. H6B V, 1, 14).
4) to deliver compliments to: “to g. him and to give him comforts,” Wint. IV, 4, 568. “I g. your honours from Andronicus,” Tit. IV, 2, 5. “g. him from me,” Tim. II, 2, 235.
5) to address in any manner: “thus he --s your majesty,” H5 II, 4, 76. “let him g. England with our sharp defiance,” III, 5, 37. “the first that there did g. my stranger soul,” R3 I, 4, 48. Absol.: “and taught it thus anew to g.” Sonn. 145, 8 (== to speak to me).
6) to show respect or kindness to: “this diamond he --s your wife withal,” Mcb. II, 1, 15. “things of such dignity as we g. modern friends withal,” Ant. V, 2, 167. “what pageantry the regent made to g. the king,” Per. V, 2, 9. Used of things, == to gratify: “it --s me as an enterprise of kindness performed to your sole daughter,” Per. IV, 3, 38.
7) to regard, to look on: “and wordless so --s heaven for his success,” Lucr. 112. “when we g., with eyes best seeing, heaven's fiery eye,” LLL V, 2, 374. “there the sun shall g. them,” H5 IV, 3, 100. “to g. mine own land with my wishful sight,” H6C III, 1, 14. “a merrier day did never yet g. Rome,” Cor. V, 4, 45. “why so sadly g. you our victory?” Cymb. V, 5, 24.
8) to meet: “to g. the empress' friends,” Tit. IV, 2, 174. “we will g. the time,” Lr. V, 1, 54. “I g. thy love, not with vain thanks, but with acceptance bounteous,” Oth III, 3, 469. Intr. == to meet and be amicably together: “upon the next occasion that we meet . . . to talk and g.” LLL V, 2, 144. “sundered friends g. in the hour of death,” H6A IV, 3, 42. “there g. in silence and sleep in peace,” Tit. I, 90. “I cannot hope Caesar and Antony shall well g. together,” Ant. II, 1, 39.
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