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Go (impf. went; partic. gone) 1) to move step by step, to walk: “I never saw a goddess go,” Sonn. 30, 11. “as proper a man as ever went on four legs,” Tp. II, 2, 63. “I can go no further,” III, 3, 1. “love will creep in service where it cannot go,” Gent. IV, 2, 20. “your wit ambles well, it --es easily,” Ado V, 1, 159. “I can no further crawl, no further go,” Mids. III, 2, 444. “if you go -- So far afoot, I shall be weary,” H4A II, 3, 86. “cannot go but thirty mile a day,” H4B II, 4, 179. “ride more than thou --est,” Lr. I, 4, 134. “--ing shall be used with feet,” III, 2, 94.
2) to walk leisurely, not to run: “we'll not run, nor go neither,” Tp. III, 2, 22. “thou must run to him, for thou hast stayed so long that --ing will scarce serve the turn,” Gent. III, 1, 388.
3) to make haste: “towards thee I'll run, and give him leave to go,” Sonn. 51, 14. “trip and go,” LLL IV, 2, 145. “I go, I go, look how I go,” Mids. III, 2, 100. “run, go!” H6B III, 2, 35.
4) to depart (the opposite of to come): “all this service have I done since I went,” Tp. V, 226. “tomorrow be in readiness to go,” Gent. I, 3, 70. “is your countryman gone?” III, 2, 12. “my daughter takes his --ing grievously,” III, 2, 12 “is the duke gone?” Meas. V, 301. “pluck but his name out of his heart, and turn him --ing,” Caes. III, 3, 39. “there's no --ing but by their consent,” Per. IV, 6, 208 etc. come go == let us go: Err. V, 114. H6A IV, 4, 40. Cymb. II, 1, 55. “to come and go:” Tp. IV, 44. Gent. III, 1, 142. Wiv. II, 2, 130. John IV, 2, 76. H6C II, 1, 129 eic. “knocks go and come,” H5 III, 2, 8 (Pistol's speech). To be gone often == to go away: “be gone!” Gent. I, 1, 156. III, 1, 168. H8 V, 1, 86. Rom. I, 5, 121. Ant. III, 11, 8 etc. “will ye be gone?” Gent. I, 2, 49; cf. I, 1, 11. “that now you are come, you will be gone,” Meas. III, 1, 180. “if it prove so, I will be gone the sooner,” Err. I, 2, 103. “I'll be gone and not trouble you,” IV, 3, 71. Mids. II, 1, 16. “our intent was to be gone from Athens,” IV, 1, 157. “I'll be gone about it straight,” Merch. II, 4, 25. “you must be gone from hence immediately,” II, 9, 8. “let us now persuade you. Not to be gone from hence,” H6A III, 2, 94. “thou must be gone from Troilus,” Troil. IV, 2, 97. “will you be gone?” Cor. IV, 2, 14. Rom. III, 5, 1. “prepare not to be gone,” I, 5, 123 etc. “get thee gone,” Err. IV, 1, 19 etc. (cf. Get).
Hence == to pass away, to vanish, to come to an end: “how things go from him,” Tim. II, 2, 4. “bruised pieces, go; you have been nobly borne,” Ant. IV, 14, 42. “she is --ing,” H8 IV, 2, 99 (== dying); cf. “now my spirit is --ing,” Ant. IV, 15, 58. To let go == a) to quit hold: “let go, and let me go,” Ven. 379. “let him go,” Err. IV, 4, 114. “now I let go your hand,” Tw. I, 3, 84. John III, 1, 192. Hml. II, 1, 96. IV, 5, 122. IV, 5, 122 V, 2, 354. Lr. IV, 6, 27. Lr. IV, 6, 27 Oth. II, 3, 154. Ant. III, 2, 63. b) to unloose, to unclasp: “let go that rude uncivil touch,” Gent. V, 4, 60. “let go thy hand,” Tw. IV, 1, 40. John III, 1, 195. “let go thy hold,” Lr. II, 4, 73. c) to give up for lost, to try to forget, (never mind): “let him go,” Tp. III, 3, 10. “sigh no mo, and let them go,” Ado II, 3, 68. “let the rest go,” All's II, 3, 155. “let that go,” II, 5, 81 (speak no more of it). “let it go; 'tis but a drum,” III, 6, 48. John III, 3, 33. R2 III, 3, 146. H6B II, 3, 47. Cor. III, 2, 18. Mcb. III, 1, 88. Hml. II, 2, 95. Oth. V, 2, 246. Ant. II, 5, 115.
Gone == a) past: are they (kisses) “not quickly told and quickly gone?” Ven. 520. “let us not burthen our remembrance with a heaviness that's gone,” Tp. V, 200. “every present time doth boast itself above a better gone,” Wint. V, 1, 97. “Tuesday night last gone,” Meas. V, 229. “'tis not ten years gone since . . .,” H4B III, 1, 57. “'tis not four days gone since I heard thence,” Cor. I, 2, 6. b) finished, consumed: “till either gorge be stuffed or prey be gone,” Ven. 58. when that (bottle) “is gone he shall drink nought but brine,” Tp. III, 2, 73. “the fuel is gone that maintained that fire,” H5 II, 3, 45. c) vanished, away: the wind would blow it (his bonnet) “off, and, being gone, play with his locks,” Ven. 1089. “'tis gone; no, it begins again,” Tp. I, 2, 394. “who is fled and gone,” Ado V, 2, 101. d) lost, ruined, dead: “all hope is gone,” Meas. I, 4, 68. “then is your cause gone too,” V, 302. “a diamond gone,” Merch. III, 1, 88. “you are gone both ways,” III, 5, 20. “the party is gone, she is gone,” LLL V, 2, 678. “I am gone for ever,” Wint. III, 3, 58. “we are gone else,” IV, 4, 851. “the suit which you demand is gone and dead,” John IV, 2, 84. “his wits are gone,” Lr. III, 6, 94. cf. “he is far gone,” Hml. II, 2, 190. “Othello's occupation's gone,” Oth. III, 3, 357. “the odds is gone,” Ant. IV, 15, 66. “he's gone,” Tp. II, 1, 122. Tp. II, 1, 122 my lord that's gone (== dead) All's IV, 5, 67. “that she were gone, given to the fire,” Wint. II, 3, 7. “the prince is gone. How gone? is dead,” III, 2, 146. “her that's gone,” V, 1, 35. “if that young Arthur be not gone already, even at that news he dies,” John III, 4, 163. “think upon these gone,” Rom. V, 3, 60. “Portia, art thou gone?” Caes. IV, 3, 166. “'tis but a man gone,” Oth. V, 1, 10. “O quick, or I am gone,” Ant. IV, 15, 31. Lr. V, 3, 315. Cymb. IV, 2, 216. e) overpowered by a sensation: “York is too far gone with grief,” R2 II, 1, 184. “thus both are gone with conscience and remorse,” R3 IV, 3, 20. cf. Overgone.
The imperative used as a rebuke: “you are a tame man, go,” Mids. III, 2, 259. “go, go; you are a knave,” H5 V, 1, 73. “you are a princox, go,” Rom. I, 5, 88 etc.
5) to move, to pass in any manner and to any end; properly and metaphorically: the sound is --ing “away,” Tp. III, 2, 157. “here! go, the desk, the purse,” Err. IV, 2, 29. “went'st not to her for a purse of ducats?” IV, 4, 90. “never --ing aright, being a watch, but being watched that it may still go right,” LLL III, 194. LLL III, 194 cf. “my dial --es not true,” All's II, 5, 6. “that way --es the game,” Mids. III, 2, 289. “I did go between them,” All's V, 3, 258; cf. Oth. III, 3, 100. “who --es there?” H6C IV, 3, 26. “thy slander hath gone through and through her heart,” Ado V, 1, 68 etc. etc. to go together == to agree, to be in keeping: they (viz honour and safety) “do not go together,” Ant. IV, 15, 47. “her beauty and her brain go not together,” Cymb. I, 2, 32. to go with == a) to attend, to be with, to be applied to: “let the proverb go with me: I'll be horn-mad,” Wiv. III, 5, 154. “good words went with her name,” Meas. III, 1, 220. “let death and honesty go with your impositions,” All's IV, 4, 29. “had rather go with sir priest than sir knight,” Tw. III, 4, 298. “that great property which still should go with Antony,” Ant. I, 1, 59. had it (victory) “gone with us,” Cymb. V, 5, 76. “grace go with you,” Meas. II, 3, 39. John III, 3, 71. H5 IV, 3, 11. H6B II, 4, 87. Mcb. II, 4, 40 etc. b) to agree, to accord: “your better wisdoms, which have freely gone with this affair,” Hml. I, 2, 15. “which is no further than the main voice of Denmark --es withal,” I, 3, 28. “went hand in hand even with the vow,” I, 5, 49. “--es thy heart with this?” Lr. I, 1, 107 (Qq --es this with thy heart?). “all my reports go with the modest truth,” IV, 7, 5. -- “which went beyond all man's endeavours,” H8 III, 2, 168. “the king has gone beyond me,” III, 2, 409 (cf. Beyond). “you go far,” I, 1, 38. “I will go further than I meant,” Meas. IV, 2, 206 (cf. Far and Further). “on this side the verdict went,” Compl. 113. Often denoting aim and purpose: to go about sth., cf. “About. --es it against the main of Poland?” Hml. IV, 4, 15. “when you went onward on this ended action,” Ado I, 1, 299. “this action I now go on is for my better grace,” Wint. II, 1, 121. “in what fashion he --es upon this present action,” Cor. I, 1, 282. I am --ing to == I am about to: Gent. III, 1, 54. Meas. III, 2, 272. R3 I, 3, 341 etc. “go a batfowling,” Tp. II, 1, 185 (cf. A). “go to buffets,” H4A II, 3, 35. “went to cuffs,” Hml. II, 2, 373. “go not to arms against mine uncle,” John III, 1, 308. “boys went to spancounter,” H6B IV, 2, 166. “go to horse,” Shr. IV, 3, 193. “to hazard,” H5 III, 7, 93. “to work,” Hml. II, 2, 139. “go to your bosom,” Meas. II, 2, 136 (== examine yourself). “go to your knees,” III, 1, 171 (cf. the resp. substantives). “ignorant to whom it --es,” Gent. II, 1, 116 (== to whom it is addressed). “let the high office and the honour go to one that would do thus,” Cor. II, 3, 129 (== fall to the share of). “more fierce quality than doth go to the creating a whole tribe of fops,” Lr. I, 2, 14. “go to it orderly,” Shr. II, 45. to go to it == a) to suffer death: three or four of his blind brothers and sisters went to it, Gent. IV. 4, 5. “so Guildenstern and Rosencrantz go to it,” Hml. V, 2, 56. b) to fornicate: “the wren goes to it,” Lr. IV, 6, 114. Lr. IV, 6, 114 “did you go to it so young?” Per. IV, 6, 80. -- Followed by an inf.; a) with to: “to take order for the wrongs I went,” Err. V, 146. “I went to seek him,” Err. V, 146 LLL IV, 1, 24. As II, 7, 128. John V, 1, 24. R2 III, 2, 211. H6A II, 3, 32 etc. b) without to, almost redundantly: “go make thyself like a nymph,” Tp. I, 2, 301. “go take this shape,” Tp. I, 2, 301 “go sleep, and hear us,” II, 1, 190. “I must go send some better messenger,” Gent. I, 1, 159. “thou wouldst as soon go kindle fire with snow,” II, 7, 19. “go mend,” Meas. III, 2, 28. “you may as well go stand upon the beach and bid the main flood bate his usual height,” Merch. IV, 1, 71. Tp. II, 2, 53. Tp. II, 2, 53 IV, 1, 37. IV, 1, 37 IV, 1, 37 V, 30. Gent. I, 2, 100. IV, 4, 123. Wiv. I. 3, 80. I, 4, 7. III, 3, 35. Meas. I, 2, 82. V, 253. Err. I, 2, 9. Err. I, 2, 9 Err. I, 2, 9 II, 2, 189. III, 1, 30. III, 1, 30 III, 1, 30 III, 1, 30 III, 2, 152. IV, 4, 116. V, 221. Ado II, 3, 273. V, 2, 103. Mids. I, 1, 246. As I, 1, 79. Shr. II, 108. Shr. II, 108 Tw. III, 3, 19. Wint. IV, 3, 15. R2 I, 4, 63. II, 2, 108. IV, 139. H5 IV, 5, 18. H6A I, 5, 14. II, 3, 28. H6B V, 1, 169. H6C I, 4, 159. II, 1, 160. II, 2, 84. IV, 1, 58. Troil. II, 1, 99. Tit. IV, 3, 7. Caes. I, 2, 25. Oth. IV, 3, 32 etc. etc. Joined to the following verb by and: “wouldst thou have me go and beg my food,” As II, 3, 31. Lr. I, 4, 82. Wint. III, 2, 205. “go some and pull down the Savoy,” H6B IV, 7, 1 etc.
Joined to adverbs: “who went about from this fair throne to heave the owner out,” Lucr. 412. “how he --es about to abuse me,” Meas. III, 2, 215. Ado I, 3, 12. IV, 1, 65. IV, 2, 28. Mids. IV, 1, 212. H5 IV, 1, 212 etc. (cf. About). “quite athwart --es all decorum,” Meas. I, 3, 31. shall make it go quick away (== pass) Tp. V, 304 (cf. Away). “gather the sequel by what went before,” Err. I, 1, 96. “let go by the actor,” Meas. II, 2, 41 (== leave him unpunished). “the first's for me; let her go by,” Shr. I, 2, 256 (leave her untouched, do not look to her). “go by, Jeronimy,” Shr. Ind. 1, 9. “had let go by the swiftest hours,” Compl. 59 (== pass). “the accidents gone by,” Tp. V, 305. “the time --es by,” Tw. III, 4, 398. “lets go by some sixteen years,” Wint. V, 3, 31. “Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,” H5 IV, 3, 57. “let sour words go by and language end,” Tim. V, 1, 223. “when went there by an age,” Caes. I, 2, 152. “the night gone by,” Lr. I, 2, 168. “not many moons gone by,” Ant. III, 12, 6 (cf. By, prepos. and adv.; see also Ado II, 1, 379). “they had gone down,” Meas. I, 2, 102 (== would have been pulled down). “down --es all before them,” H5 III Chor. H5 III Chor. “the moon --es down at twelve,” Mcb. II, 1, 3 (== sets). to go even == to agree: “the rest --es even,” Tw. V, 246. “shunned to go even with what I heard,” Cymb. I, 4, 47. “to go far,” Wint. I, 2, 218 etc. (cf. Far). “if a virgin, and your affection not gone forth,” Tp. I, 2, 448. “ere the writs go forth,” H6B V, 3, 26. “if he had gone forth Consul,” Cor. IV, 6, 35. “when --es this forward?” Cor. IV, 5, 228 (cf. Forward). “it shall go hard but I'll prove it,” Gent. I, 1, 86. “it shall go hard but I will better the instruction,” Merch. III, 1, 75. “it shall go hard if Cambio go without her,” Shr. IV, 4, 109. “when a man's servant shall play the cur with him, it --es hard,” Gent. IV, 4, 2. “it will go hard with poor Antonio,” Merch. III, 2, 292. “'twill go hard with you,” H6B IV, 2, 108. to go in == a) to enter: Wiv. I, 1, 288. II, 1, 171. III, 3, 244 etc. b) to have room enough: “he is too big to go in there,” Wiv. III, 3, 142. to go near == to be like to: “it will go near to remove his fit,” Tp. II, 2, 78. “it will go near to be thought so,” Ado IV, 2, 24. “this passion would go near to make a man look sad,” Mids. V, 294. “would have gone near to fall in love with him,” As III, 5, 125. “you shall go near to call them knaves,” H6B I, 2, 102. to go off (cf. Off) == a) to be discharged: H4B II, 4, 147. b) to depart: “the soul and body rive not more in parting than greatness --ing off,” Ant. IV, 13, 6. c) to be deducted: “I would the friends we miss were safe arrived. Some must go off,” Mcb. V, 8, 36.* d) to fall, to be cut off: “off --es your head,” H6B IV, 1, 17. R3 IV, 5, 4. H8 I, 2, 186. e) to be taken off: this woman's “an easy glove; she --es off and on at pleasure,” All's V, 3, 279. to go on == a) to get on one's way, to set off: “go safely on to seek thy son,” Tp. II, 1, 327. “go on before,” Gent. II, 4, 186 etc. b) to continue: Ado V, 1, 1. Wint. I, 2, 82 etc. c) to proceed: “it --es on, I see, as my soul prompts it,” Tp. I, 2, 419. “with the same haviour that your passion bears --es on my master's grief,” Tw. III, 4, 227. “whose quality, --ing on, the sides o' the world may danger,” Ant. I, 2, 198. d) to be put on: All's V, 3, 279. to go out == a) to leave a place: “may I not go out ere he come?” Wiv. IV, 2, 51. 66 etc. b) to set out, to march out: “there are other men fitter to go out than I,” H4B III, 2, 126 (== to march as soldiers). “his power went out in such distractions,” Ant. III, 7, 77. “upon this French --ing out,” H8 I, 1, 73. “old Joan had not gone out,” H6B II, 1, 4 (== had not taken her flight). c) to cease, to be extinguished: “thinkest thou the fiery fever will go out with titles blown from adulation?” H5 IV, 1, 270. then out it --es (viz the candle) H8 III, 2, 97. Lr. I, 4, 237. to go round == to turn round, to revolve: “nineteen zodiacs have gone round,” Meas. I, 2, 172. “cup us, till the world go round,” Ant. II, 7, 125. to go through == to do one's utmost: “I do it for some piece of money, and go through with all,” Meas. II, 1, 285. “I have gone through for this piece,” Per. IV, 2, 47. to go up == to be put up: “the sword --es up again,” Caes. V, 1, 52. go to == come! (a phrase of exhortation or reproof): Tp. V, 297. Gent. II, 1, 13. Wiv. I, 4, 165. II, 2, 159. II, 1, 7. III, 3, 42. Meas. II, 1, 59. II, 2, 156. III, 2, 218. LLL V, 1, 80. Merch. II, 2, 169. As IV, 1, 130. Shr. V, 1, 139. All's V, 2, 58. Tw. II, 5, 168. III, 4, 105. Wint. IV, 4, 709. I, 2, 182. H4B III, 2, 127. H8 IV, 2, 103. H6C IV, 1, 89. Troil. III, 2, 56. Lr. I, 4, 101. III, 3, 8. Oth. IV, 1, 177. IV, 2, 194. Meas. II, 2, 12. IV, 2, 31. Ado I, 1, 202. II, 1, 128. IV, 2, 86. LLL III, 203. All's II, 3, 275. I, 1, 59. John IV, 1, 97. H4A II, 1, 104. III, 3, 70. H6A V, 4, 70. H6B IV, 2, 164. H6B IV, 2, 164 R3 II, 4, 35. Troil. III, 1, 73. Rom. I, 5, 79. Rom. I, 5, 79 Rom. I, 5, 79 II, 4, 196 etc.
6) to proceed, to have its course regulated: “loving --es by haps,” Ado III, 1, 105. “hanging and wiving --es by destiny,” Merch. II, 9, 83. “preferment --es by letter and affection,” Oth. I, 1, 36. “we go by the moon and seven stars,” H4A I, 2, 15. “his disposition would have gone to the truth of his words,” Wiv. II, 1, 61. Used of tunes and melodies: “that --es without a burden,” Ado III, 4, 44. “this tune --es manly,” Mcb. IV, 3, 235. “--es to the tune of Two Maids,” Wint. IV, 4, 295. cf. 11th definition.
7) to fare, to be in a good or ill state: “you shall hear how things go,” Wiv. IV, 5, 126. Tim. III, 6, 20. “things go ill,” Cymb. I, 6, 95. “how --es the world?” Shr. IV, 1, 36. Wint. II, 3, 72. Tim. I, 1, 2. II, 2, 36. Caes. V, 5, 22. Mcb. II, 4, 21. Hml. II, 2, 179. Lr. IV, 6, 151 (cf. World). “howe'er the business --es,” Wint. III, 2, 218. H8 IV, 1, 23. “how --es the day with us?” John V, 3, 1. “how --es the field?” H4A V, 5, 16. “crossly to thy good all fortune --es,” R2 II, 4, 24. “how --es our reckoning?” Tim. II, 2, 159. “how --es the night?” Mcb. II, 1, 1 (what time of night is it?). “nothing --es right,” Meas. IV, 4, 37. “with princes if it shall go well,” Sonn. 14, 7. “all --es well,” LLL V, 2, 113. John III, 4, 4. H4A IV, 1, 83. H6C IV, 2, 1. Oth. II, 3, 380. Ant. III, 10, 27. “nought shall go ill,” Mids. III, 2, 462. “all --es worse,” R2 III, 2, 120. “it must go wrong with you,” John I, 41. “it --es so heavily with my disposition,” Hml. II, 2, 309. “how it --es with us,” Meas. I, 1, 58. Wint. V, 2, 29. Mcb. IV, 3, 180. Oth. IV, 3, 11. Ant. I, 5, 38. IV, 12, 3. V, 2, 332. Cymb. III, 5, 22.
8) to exist, to live, to be: “thou among the wastes of time must go,” Sonn. 12, 10. “wit shall not go unrewarded,” Tp. IV, 242. “if you went in pain, this knave would go sore,” Err. III, 1, 65. “Benedick --es foremost in report,” Ado III, 1, 97. “thou shalt like an airy spirit go,” Mids. III, 1, 164. “I shall make shift to go without him,” Merch. I, 2, 97; cf. Shr. IV, 4, 109 and Oth. I, 3, 368. “it --es much against my stomach,” As III, 2, 21 and H5 III, 2, 56; cf. “you go against the hair of your professions,” Wiv. II, 3, 41. “commendations go with pity,” All's I, 1, 49. “the story then --es false,” V, 3, 229. “let men go free,” H5 III, 6, 44; cf. Hml. III, 1, 196. III, 3, 26. IV, 3, 2. “which of the peers have uncontemned gone by him?” H8 III, 2, 10. “yet go we under our opinion still that we have better men,” Troil. I, 3, 383. “he has done nobly, and cannot go without any honest man's voice,” Cor. II, 3, 139. “answer have I none but what should go by water,” Oth. IV, 2, 104. “she went before others,” Cymb. I, 4, 78 (== was superior to others); cf. V, 2, 8.
9) to be current: “should go so general current through the world,” H4A IV, 1, 5. “your ill angel is light; but I hope he that looks upon me will take me without weighing; and yet in some respects I cannot go, I cannot tell,” H4B I, 2, 190. “go current from suspicion,” R3 II, 1, 94. “the report --es,” Wiv. I, 3, 58. “an old tale --es,” IV, 4, 28. cf. All's V, 1, 13. Tim. V, 1, 18. “the hare of whom the proverb --es,” John II, 137; cf. Wiv. III, 5, 154. “the voice --es,” H8 IV, 2, 11. “the noise --es,” Troil. I, 2, 12. “the cry went once on thee,” III, 3, 184; cf. Oth. IV, 1, 127. “the whisper --es so,” Hml. I, 1, 80.
10) to be accepted as current, to pass: “this same shall go,” LLL IV, 3, 59. “the property by what it is should go, not by the title,” All's II, 3, 137. “the things they go under,” III, 5, 22 (== what they pretend to be); cf. Ado II, 1, 212. “to be said an honest man --es as fairly as . . .,” Tw. IV, 2, 10. “in the catalogue ye go for men,” Mcb. III, 1, 92. cf. “how go maidenheads?” Troil. IV, 2, 23.
11) to be expressed in words, to run: “thus it --es,” As II, 5, 51. “and thane of Cawdor too: went it not so?” Mcb. I, 3, 87. cf. 6th definition.
12) to be dressed: “he that --es in the calf's skin,” Err. IV, 3, 18. Err. IV, 3, 18 Ado I, 1, 247. V, 1, 96. V, 1, 96 LLL V, 2, 717. As III, 2, 234. Shr. III, 2, 76. Tw. III, 4, 416. H6B IV, 1, 48. IV, 2, 13. IV, 2, 13 Troil. III, 2, 99. Tim. V, 1, 70. Lr. II, 4, 271. Oth. II, 1, 151.
13) to be pregnant: “thirty three years have I but gone in travail of you,” Err. V, 400. “the child I now go with,” H4B V, 4, 10. “went with child of Edward,” R3 III, 5, 86. “great-bellied women that had not half a week to go,” H8 IV, 1, 77. “the fruit she --es with,” V, 1, 20. “go great with tigers,” Tim. IV, 3, 188.
14) to become: “the prince will go mad,” Troil. IV, 2, 78. Lr. II, 4, 289.
15) Seemingly trans., == to enter on, to make: “look forward on the journey you shall go,” Meas. IV, 3, 61. “you go not the way to examine,” Ado IV, 2, 35. Wint. III, 3, 132. John V, 3, 7. Mcb. II, 3, 21. (cf. Way). “a king may go a progress through the guts of a beggar,” Hml. IV, 3, 33.
16) Peculiar phrases: “you shall go,” H4B III, 2, 127 (== march, become a soldier). “in what key shall a man take you, to go in the song?” Ado I, 1, 188 (== to join you in your song). there it --es == well done! Tp. IV, 257. Tit. IV, 3, 76.
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