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Good, adj. having such qualities as are desired, not bad, not evil: “it should the g. ship so have swallowed,” Tp. I, 2, 16. “with his g. arms,” II, 1, 119. “by this g. light,” II, 2, 147. “of many g. I think him best,” Gent. I, 2, 21. “g. company,” I, 3, 43. “that's not g.” Meas. II, 4, 75. “a g. sharp fellow,” Ado I, 2, 19. “an army of g. words,” Merch. III, 5, 72. “quick, g. hands,” Ant. V, 2, 39. “she's a g. sign, but I have seen small reflection of her wit,” Cymb. I, 2, 32 etc. etc. == virtuous, well disposed: “g. wombs have borne bad sons,” Tp. I, 2, 120. “g. natures,” Tp. I, 2, 120 “g. things will strive to dwell with it,” Tp. I, 2, 120 “g. angels preserve the king,” II, 1, 306. “the hand that hath made you fair hath made you g.” Meas. III, 1, 185. “a song of g. life,” Tw. II, 3, 37. 39 etc. (see below to make g.) == kind: “like a g. parent,” Tp. I, 2, 94. with the help of your g. hands, Tp. Epil. Tp. I, 2, 94 “your g. heart,” Wiv. I, 1, 83. “gave me g. eyes,” I, 3, 67. “you must be so g. to rise,” Meas. IV, 3, 29 (Pompey's speech). “be so g. as read me this letter,” LLL IV, 2, 92 (Jaquenetta's speech). “who builds his hopes in air of your g. looks,” R3 III, 4, 100 (Qq fair). “g. leave,” As I, 1, 109 Merch. III, 2, 326. John I, 231. H4A I, 3, 20. H6C III, 2, 34. “your g. pleasure,” Caes. II, 1, 286. “your g. advice,” Mcb. III, 1, 21. “be g. to me,” Meas. III, 2, 202. H4B II, 1, 69. “be g. to Rome,” Cor. IV, 6, 112. “the gods be g. unto us,” V, 4, 33. “I would be g. to thee,” Tim. I, 2, 243. “to be so g. to Caesar as to hear me,” Caes. II, 4, 29. “I will be g. to thee,” IV, 3, 266. my g. lady, lord, master == my patroness, patron (cf. Lady etc.). In compellations almost == dear: “g. boatswain,” Tp. I, 1, 10. “g. Fate,” Tp. I, 1, 10 “g. sir,” I, 2, 88. I, 2, 88 “be calm, g. wind,” Gent. I, 2, 118. “g. Eglamour,” V, 1, 8. “do me no harm, g. man,” Wint. IV, 4, 199. Err. III, 1, 1. IV, 4, 50 etc. “my g. lord here,” H6B II, 1, 196. “g. mine host,” Wiv. I, 3, 13. IV, 6, 18. “g. your graces,” H8 III, 1, 78. Oth. I, 3, 52. “g. my complexion,” As III, 2, 204 (cf. My, Mine, Your, Lord etc.). == favourable, propitious: “your own g. fortune,” Tp. II, 1, 270. “g. hap,” Gent. I, 1, 15. “your g. word,” III, 2, 42. “in g. time,” Tp. II, 1, 95. Err. II, 2, 58. 65 (cf. Time). g. night, g. day, g. morrow; cf.. Night etc. == fit, proper, convenient, useful: “'tis a g. dulness,” Tp. I, 2, 185. “lest it should ravel and be g. to none,” Gent. III, 2, 52. “what's that g. for?” Merch. III, 1, 54. “'tis not g. that children should know any wickedness,” Wiv. II, 2, 133. “'tis g. we do so,” Merch. II, 4, 28 (== let us do so). “'twere g. you sent him thither,” Gent. I, 3, 29. II, 4, 7. Meas. II, 4, 42. Hml. IV, 5, 14. “'twere g. you do so much,” Merch. IV, 1, 261. “he were as g. go a mile on his errand,” Meas. III, 2, 38 (Elbow's speech). a' were as g. crack a fusty nut, Troil. II, <*>, 111 (Thersites' speech). “as g. as rotten,” Per. IV, 2, 9. “as g. to chide the waves as speak them fair,” H6C V, 4, 24 (== to as little purpose); cf. “you were as g. to shoot against the wind,” Tit. IV, 3, 57. g. at sth. == skilful in: “g. at such eruptions,” LLL V, 1, 120. “he's as g. at any thing,” As V, 4, 110. “art thou g. at these kickshawses?” Tw. I, 3, 122. “ever g. at sudden commendations,” H8 V, 3, 122. 'tis g., in answers, == well, Meas. III, 2, 61. IV, 1, 14. Caes. II, 1, 60. Oth. III, 4, 201. And g. alone: “g., then, if his face be the worst thing about him, how could . . .,” Meas. II, 1, 163. “would we could see you at Corinth! G., gramercy,” Tim. II, 2, 74. Troil. I, 2, 14. IV, 2, 74. Mcb. IV, 1, 96. Hml. IV, 3, 48. V, 1, 17. Oth. IV, 1, 222. Ant. V, 2, 270. “g. as the best,” Tim. V, 1, 24. == rich, wealthy: “Antonio is a g. man,” Merch. I, 3, 12. “my meaning in saying he is a g. man is to have you understand me that he is sufficient,” Merch. I, 3, 12 “we are accounted poor citizens, the patricians g.” Cor. I, 1, 16. Used simply to raise and strengthen the meaning of a word: “in g. sooth,” Tp. II, 2, 150; cf. g. deed == indeed, Wint. I, 2, 42. “thy g. friend Trinculo,” Tp. II, 2, 106. “no great g. lover of the archbishop's,” H8 IV, 1, 104. “for a g. wager,” Tp. II, 1, 28. “may be a precedent and witness g. that thou . . .,” R2 II, 1, 130. g. cheap == cheap, H4A III, 3, 51 (cf. Cheap). “bid him suppose some g. necessity touches his friend,” Tim. II, 2, 236. “that your g. beauties be the happy cause of Hamlet's wildness,” Hml. III, 1, 39. “I have g. hope thou didst not know on't,” Lr. II, 4, 191. “pregnant to g. pity,” IV, 6, 227. “is't too dull for your g. wearing?” Cymb. II, 4, 41.
I'll be as g. as my word == I'll keep my word: Wiv. III, 4, 112. Tw. III, 4, 357. H4A III, 3, 164. H4B V, 5, 90. H5 IV, 8, 33. “as g. as promise,” Cymb. V, 4, 137.
To make g. == a) to prove to be blameless: “was this inserted to make interest g.?” Merch. I, 3, 95. “I say good queen, and would by combat make her g.” Wint. II, 3, 60. b) to prove to be true: “if he make this g.” Gent. II, 4, 75. Err. V, 375. Ado V, 1, 147. Tw. I, 5, 7. R2 I, 1, 4. R2 I, 1, 4 R2 I, 1, 4 Troil. I, 3, 274. Rom. V, 3, 286. Mcb. III, 1, 8. Mcb. III, 1, 8 Hml. I, 2, 210. c) to maintain: “I made g. my place,” H8 V, 4, 57. “convenient numbers to make g. the city,” Cor. I, 5, 13. “our potency made g.” Lr. I, 1, 175. “made g. the passage,” Cymb. V, 3, 23 (In this sense the two words are never separated by the object). d) to perform, to carry into effect: “Silver made it g. in the coldest fault,” Shr. Ind. 1, 19. “that I may soon make g. what I have said,” Shr. I, 1, 74. “go with me to make the matter g.” IV, 2, 114. “I'll warrant they'll make it g.” H6B V, 1, 122. “make g. this ostentation,” Cor. I, 6, 86. “of no power to make his wishes g.” Tim. I, 2, 202. “what power is in Agrippa, to make this g.?” Ant. II, 2, 145.
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