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Hang, (impf. and partic. --ed in the sense to execute by the halter, else hung. In Mids. V, 366 Ff hung, Qq regularly --ed. Hanged for “hung:” Pilgr. 183. As III, 2, 182. Cymb. II, 4, 68). 1) tr. a) to suspend, to fasten to an object above: “over my altars hath he hung his lance,” Ven. 103. “like a jewel hung in ghastly night,” Sonn. 27, 11. “h. them on this line,” Tp. IV, 193. Wiv. IV, 2, 217. Meas. I, 2, 171. Ado I, 1, 243. Mids. II, 1, 15. As III, 2, 182. 379 etc. Metaphorically: “and h. more praise upon deceased I,” Sonn. 72, 7 (as on a tomb). With out: h. out our “banners,” Mcb. V, 5, 1. With up: “h. me up at the door of a brothel-house for the sign of blind Cupid,” Ado I, 1, 255. H4A II, 4, 479. H6A V, 4, 174. H6C I, 3, 28. R3 I, 1, 6. Tim. I, 2, 103.
b) to let fall, to bend down, to decline; to h. the head, in sign of grief: Ven. 666. Ven. 666 Lucr. 521. Lucr. 521 H6A III, 2, 124. H6B I, 2, 2. H8 III, 1, 11. H8 III, 1, 11 V, 5, 33. Tit. IV, 4, 70. Oth. IV, 3, 32. to h. the lip (in sheepishness and stupidity): H4A II, 4, 446. Troil. III, 1, 152. “hung their eyelids down,” H4A III, 2, 81. “the pine --s his sprays,” H6B II, 3, 45. “how would he h. his wings,” Tit. III, 2, 61.
c) to attach, to tie, to make adhere: “what passion --s these weights upon my tongue?” As I, 2, 269. “restoration h. thy medicine on my lips,” Lr. IV, 7, 26. “no hinge nor loop to h. a doubt on,” Oth. III, 3, 366.
d) to make hover and impend, and hence to make linger: “when Jove will o'er some high-viced city h. his poison in the sick air,” Tim. IV, 3, 109. “and --s resolved correction in the arm that was upreared to execution,” H4B IV, 1, 213. “thou hast hung thy advanced sword in the air,” Troil. IV, 5, 188.
e) to furnish or cover by any thing suspended: “hung with trophies,” Sonn. 31, 10. “a cabin --ed with care,” Pilgr. 183. “their heads are hung with ears that sweep away the morning dew,” Mids. IV, 1, 125. Shr. Ind. 1, 47. H6A I, 1, 1. Caes. I, 1, 74. Cymb. II, 4, 68.
f) to kill or execute by the halter: Tp. I, 1, 35. Tp. I, 1, 35 III, 3, 59. Gent. II, 5, 5. IV, 4, 16. Wiv. V, 5, 191. Meas. III, 2, 124. Meas. III, 2, 124 IV, 2, 42. IV, 3, 24.* V, 510. Ado II, 3, 82. LLL V, 2, 610. LLL V, 2, 610 Mids. IV, 2, 23. V, 366. Merch. IV, 1, 134. Merch. IV, 1, 134 Merch. IV, 1, 134 Shr. III, 2, 228. Tw. I, 3, 13. III, 4, 136. John II, 505. H5 IV, 4, 77. H6B I, 3, 222. H6C IV, 5, 26. R3 I, 2, 84. V, 3, 331 etc. “confessed it, --ed it,” Tim. I, 2, 22. “to confess and be --ed,” Oth. IV, 1, 38. “you must h. it first, and draw it afterwards,” Ado III, 2, 24, with an obscene quibble; cf. “he that --s himself is a virgin,” All's I, 1, 150, and: “seek thou rather to be --ed in compassing thy joy than to be drowned,” Oth. I, 3, 367; perhaps also in Tw. I, 5, 20. With up: “h. him up,” Gent. IV, 4, 24. Err. II, 1, 67. LLL IV, 3, 54. H6B IV, 2, 190. Rom. III, 3, 57. Mcb. IV, 2, 58. Ant. V, 2, 62. Per. IV, 6, 146. --ing, substantively: Tp. I, 1, 33. Meas. II, 1, 250. IV, 2, 35. IV, 2, 35 V, 365. Merch. II, 9, 83. Tw. I, 5, 19. Tw. I, 5, 19 Wint. IV, 4, 702. Cymb. I, 5, 20 etc. be --ed, used as a curse: “be --ed an hour,” Meas. V, 360. “Poins, Poins, and be --ed,” H4A II, 2, 4. “how got they in, and be --ed?” H8 V, 4, 17. “speak, and be --ed!” Tim. V, 1, 134. h. me == I'll be damned: LLL IV, 3, 9. H6B I, 3, 200. “h. thee!” Tw. II, 5, 114. Tim. IV, 3, 87. “h. him!” Wiv. II, 2, 281. Wiv. II, 2, 281 III, 3, 196. IV, 2, 104. Ado III, 2, 18. All's III, 5, 17. Tw. III, 4, 130. “h. her!” Wiv. IV, 2, 201. “h. it!” Ado III, 2, 23. “h. you!” All's III, 5, 94. H4A II, 2, 93. Cor. I, 1, 185. Per. IV, 6, 158. “h. 'em!” Wiv. II, 1, 179. Cor. I, 1, 194. “h. the trifle,” Wiv. II, 1, 46 etc. “h. up thy mistress,” Err. II, 1, 67. Rom. III, 3, 57. “I can as well be --ed,” Caes. I, 2, 235. H5 IV, 1, 235.
g) to cause to be executed by the halter: “you will h. them,” Meas. II, 1, 216. “that were enough to h. us all,” Mids. I, 2, 79. Mids. I, 2, 79 “the usurer --s the cozener,” Lr. IV, 6, 167.
2) intr. a) to be suspended, to be supported by an object above: “his braided --ing mane,” Ven. 271. “where --s a piece of skilful painting,” Lucr. 1366. Sonn. 24, 7. 73, 2. Pilgr. 135. Tp. III, 3, 45. V, 94. Gent. IV, 2, 122. Ado V, 1, 318. V, 3, 9. LLL V, 2, 922. Tw. I, 3, 108. Cor. I, 3, 12. Rom. V, 1, 42. Mcb. III, 5, 24. Hml. V, 1, 207 etc. “to h. quite out of fashion,” Troil. III, 3, 151; cf. Meas. I, 2, 171 and Cor. I, 3, 12. “thereby --s a tale:” Wiv. I, 4, 159. As II, 7, 28. Shr. IV, 1, 60. Oth. III, 1, 8. “a fearful -- ing rock,” Gent. I, 2, 121. “to h. out,” Mids. IV, 2, 42; cf. R2 V, 2, 56. “my skin --s about me like a loose gown,” H4A III, 3, 3; cf. Mcb. V, 2, 21.
b) With about and on, == to cling to: “h. no more about me,” Wiv. II, 2, 17. “my conscience, --ing about the neck of my heart,” Merch. II, 2, 14. “she hung about my neck,” Shr. II, 310. Wint. V, 3, 112. “h. not on my garments,” Tp. I, 2, 474. Meas. II, 2, 44. “he will h. upon him like a disease,” Ado I, 1, 86. Mids. III, 2, 233. H4B II, 1, 74. II, 3, 44. Tim. II, 2, 56. Hml. I, 2, 143. With by: “--ing by his neck,” Ven. 593. With off: “h. off, thou cat, thou burr,” Mids. III, 2, 260 (== cease to hang on me, let go).
c) to hover, and hence to impend: “by the sky that --s above our heads,” John II, 397. “those musicians h. in the air,” H4A III, 1, 227. “night --s upon mine eyes,” Caes. V, 5, 41. “sleep shall neither night nor day h. upon his lid,” Mcb. I, 3, 20; cf. Per. V, 1, 236. “the clouds still h. on you,” Hml. I, 2, 66. “my cudgel shall h. like a meteor o'er the cuckold's horns,” Wiv. II, 2, 292. “devouring pestilence --s in our air,” R2 I, 3, 284. “reproach and dissolution --eth over him,” II, 1, 258. V, 3, 3. H6B II, 4, 50. Rom. I, 4, 107. Lr. III, 4, 70.
d) to dwell, to lie, to be attached: “on my eyelids shall conjecture h.” Ado IV, 1, 107. it (shame) “will h. upon my richest robes,” H6B II, 4, 108; cf. “contempt and beggary --s upon thy back,” Rom. V, 1, 71. “some dreadful story --ing on thy tongue,” H6C II, 1, 44. “never hung poison on a fouler toad,” R3 I, 2, 148; cf. haply some poison yet doth h. on them (his lips) Rom. V, 3, 165. “the blame may h. upon your hardness,” Cor. V, 3, 91. “his large fortune upon his good and gracious nature --ing,” Tim. I, 1, 56. “sundry blessings h. about his throne,” Mcb. IV, 3, 158. “that life may h. no longer on me,” Ant. IV, 9, 15.
e) to totter, to rock, to waver: “many likelihoods . . . . which hung so tottering in the balance,” All's I, 3, 129. “when you and those . . . hung on our driving boat,” Tw. I, 2, 11. “h. no more in doubts,” John III, 1, 219. Quibbling: “which will h. upon my tongue like a newmarried wife about her husband's neck,” H5 V, 2, 189; cf. H6C II, 1, 44.
f) With together, == 1) to hold together: “as idle as she may h. together,” Wiv. III, 2, 13 (cf. Wint. II, 2, 22). 2) to be in keeping: “mark how well the sequel --s together,” R3 III, 6, 4.
g) to rest on, to depend: “his own life hung upon the staff he threw,” H4B IV, 1, 126. “the welfare of us all --s on the cutting short that fraudful man,” H6B III, 1, 81. H8 III, 2, 367. Troil. II, 3, 217.
h) to be executed by the halter: “a good --ing prevents a bad marriage,” Tw. I, 5, 20. “if I h., I'll make a fat pair of gallows,” H4A II, 1, 74. “upon the next tree shalt thou h.” Mcb. V, 5, 39. Used as a curse: “let her go h.” Tp. II, 2, 56. “let them h.” Cor. III, 2, 23. “h., cur, h.,” Tp. I, 1, 46. H6A III, 2, 68. Rom. III, 5, 194. “go h.” Tp. II, 2, 53. Ant. II, 7, 59.
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