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Have (abbreviated to ha or “ha':” Wiv. III, 3, 18. Wiv. III, 3, 18 Shr. III, 2, 118. IV, 1, 61. V, 2, 37. All's V, 2, 40. Wint. I, 2, 267. II, 3, 114. IV, 3, 80. H5 IV, 7, 7. H6C IV, 5, 27. H8 V, 1, 173. Cor. I, 1, 229. II, 3, 82. Tim. II, 2, 48. III, 1, 25. III, 1, 25 III, 2, 51. Caes. I, 3, 19. Hml. II, 2, 565. IV, 5, 64. IV, 7, 157. V, 1, 26. Ant. II, 6, 78. II, 7, 75. II, 7, 75 IV, 8, 20. Cymb. IV, 2, 390 etc. Qq ha, Ff “have:” Ado III, 5, 34. H4B II, 4, 258. Oth. II, 3, 40. III, 1, 3. III, 1, 3 IV, 2, 113. ha't rhyming to “Kate:” Shr. V, 2, 181. Corrupted to a: “she might a been a grandam,” LLL V, 2, 17. Qq a, Ff “ha:” Hml. IV, 5, 64. Having monosyll. in the beginning of the verse: Ven. 828. Tp. I, 2, 479. All's V, 3, 123. Hml. II, 1, 43 etc. cf. Being).
1) Auxiliary vb. used to form tenses: Ven. 2. Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 Ven. 2 572 etc. etc. Tp. I, 2, 1. Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 Tp. I, 2, 1 482 etc. etc. had for should have or would have: “she had not brought forth thee,” Ven. 204. “I had peopled,” Tp. I, 2, 350. Gent. II, 4, 88. IV, 1, 35. IV, 4, 16. IV, 4, 16 Wiv. II, 2, 256. Meas. II, 1, 14. Err. III, 2, 151. IV, 1, 3. Hml. I, 1, 91 etc. The inf. of the perf. seemingly for that of the pres., if that which was expected or intended has not taken place: “my curtail dog that wont to have played, plays not at all,” Pilgr. 273. “I had other things to have spoken with her,” Wiv. IV, 5, 41. “we had like to have had our two noses snapped off,” Ado V, 1, 115. “I did think to have beaten thee,” V, 4, 111. “with Demetrius thought to have spoke thereof,” Mids. I, 1, 112. “my purpose was not to have seen you here,” Merch. III, 2, 230. “if you had pleased to have defended it,” V, 204. “he was skilful enough to have lived still, if knowledge could be set up against mortality,” All's I, 1, 34. “you might have saved me my pains, to have taken it away yourself,” Tw. II, 2, 6 (== if you had taken). Wint. IV, 4, 750. H6A II, 5, 89. H8 IV, 2, 152. Hml. V, 1, 268. Ant. II, 2, 79. II, 6, 50. V, 1, 38. Cymb. III, 6, 48. V, 5, 66. Preceded by I had thought (cf. subst. Thought): “I had thought to have learned his health of you,” R2 II, 3, 24. “I had thought to have held my peace until you had drawn oaths from him,” Wint. I, 2, 28. “which he had thought to have murdered,” H6B II, 3, 107. “I had thought to have yerked him here under the ribs,” Oth. I, 2, 5. “I had thought to have held it poor,” Ant. III, 13, 186. cf. “I had thought I had had men of some understanding of my council,” H8 V, 3, 135. Similarly after should and would: “he told me Paris should have married Juliet,” Rom. V, 3, 78. I hoped thou shoulds<*> have been my Hamlet's wife, Hml. V, 1, 267. “you would have married her most shamefully,” Wiv. V, 5, 234. “she would have made Hercules have turned spit,” Ado II, 1, 261. “I would have told you of good wrestling,” As I, 2, 116 (== was going to tell you, but was prevented). All's II, 3, 29. All's II, 3, 29 Tw. V, 268. H8 V, 1, 119. Tim. III, 6, 22. Caes. II, 4, 4. Ant. III, 11, 56. had been == was or were, if the actual state is contrary to expectation: “I thought that all things had been savage here,” As II, 7, 107. “I thought your honour had already been at Shrewsbury,” H4A IV, 2, 58. “I did not think Master Silence had been a man of this mettle,” H4B V, 3, 40. cf. “I thought King Henry had resembled thee,” H6B I, 3, 56.
2) principal verb; a) to possess, to own: “what a horse should h.” Ven. 299. “hast thou a tongue?” Ven. 299 Ven. 299 “that thou hast her,” Sonn. 42, 1, Sonn. 42, 1 Tp. I, 2, 83. Tp. I, 2, 83 Tp. I, 2, 83 Tp. I, 2, 83 Wiv. III, 3, 231. All's III, 2, 102. Troil. III, 3, 98. Cor. I, 1, 229. Ant. II, 7, 75 etc. Pass.: “whose worthiness gives scope, being had, to triumph,” Sonn. 52, 14. “had, having, and in quest to have,” 129, 10. “grief, being altogether had,” R2 III, 4, 15. “nought's had, all's spent,” Mcb. III, 2, 4. Prov. “have is have:” John I, 173. To h. one's eyes, one's mouth, see Eye, Mouth.
b) not to be without, not to want, as something that is connected with, or inherent in one: “--ing no defects,” Ven. 138. “the sea hath bounds,” Ven. 138 “I had my load,” Ven. 138 “whom thou hast aboard,” Tp. I, 1, 20. “he hath no drowning mark upon him,” Tp. I, 1, 20 “who had some noble creature in her,” I, 2, 7. “had I not four women that tended me?” I, 2, 7 I, 2, 7 “he's a spirit of persuasion,” II, 1, 235. “Caliban has a new master,” II, 2, 189. “we have stomachs,” III, 3, 41. “now would I have thee to my tutor,” Gent. III, 1, 84. “nobody but has his fault,” Wiv. I, 4, 15. “she has a huswife's hand,” As IV, 3, 27. “he has no pace, but runs where he will,” All's IV, 5, 70. “the present sickness that I have,” R2 II, 1, 132. “he has a familiar under his tongue,” H6B IV, 7, 114. “let her have your knees,” Oth. II, 1, 84 etc. etc. “the world hath ending,” Ven. 12. “have care,” Tp. I, 1, 10. “I have great comfort from this fellow,” I, 1, 30. “have comfort,” I, 2, 25. “you have cause of joy,” II, 1, 1. “I have hope,” V, 308. “have you a mind to sink,” I, 1, 42. have a false “interpreter,” Gent. I, 2, 78. “my desires had instance,” Wiv. II, 2, 256. “let's ha' no more ado,” H6C IV, 5, 27. “let's ha' some sport,” Tim. II, 2, 48. “let me have war,” Cor. IV, 5, 236 (in the sense of give, q. v.). etc. cf. the respective substantives. With an inf.: “I have to show to the contrary,” Wiv. II, 1, 38 (== I can prove the contrary).
c) to receive, to get: “which thou unasked shalt have,” Ven. 102. Ven. 102 “you shall have a kiss,” Ven. 102 “he shall pay for him that hath him,” Tp. II, 2, 81. “I would my master had mistress Anne,” Wiv. III, 4, 108. “howsoever he hath had intelligence,” IV, 2, 94. “sixpence that I had o' Wednesday last,” Err. I, 2, 55. “the saddler had it, sir, I kept it not,” Err. I, 2, 55 “to pay thee that I never had,” IV, 1, 74. “Jack hath not Jill,” LLL V, 2, 885. I no question make to have it (money), Merch. I, 1, 185. “the --ing any of these lords,” I, 2, 109. “would he were gelt that had it,” V, 144. V, 144 V, 144 you shall ha't (a penny) All's V, 2, 40. “I sent thee sixpence for thy leman: hadst it?” Tw. II, 3, 26. Tw. II, 3, 26 R2 I, 1, 126. H5 IV, 3, 48. H8 V, 1, 173. Cor. II, 3, 82. Tit. II, 3, 145. With from: “the heat I have from thence,” Ven. 195. “the sight whereof I think you had from me,” Ado V, 4, 25. “a had him from me Christian,” H4B II, 2, 76. cf. Sonn. 75, 12. With of: “he had of me a chain,” Err. IV, 1, 10. IV, 4, 138. V, 2. “the remuneration I had of thy master,” LLL V, 1, 76. “I had it of him,” Merch. V, 258. Tim. V, 1, 6. Cymb. V, 5, 136. With where: “where had he wine?” Tp. V, 278. “where had you this pretty weathercock?” Wiv. III, 2, 18. LLL IV, 3, 196. All's V, 3, 284. H4A IV, 2, 77. “wheresoever you had it,” Oth. IV, 1, 161. Passive: “no sooner had, past reason hated,” Sonn. 129, 6. Sonn. 129, 6 “the main consents are had,” All's V, 3, 69. “whose spiritual counsel had,” Wint. II, 1, 186. “a new link to the bucket must needs be had,” H4B V, 1, 24. “that had, give't these fellows,” Tim. II, 2, 238. cf. Sonn. 75, 12.
d) to have received or obtained, to have got or gained: “this wish I h.” Sonn. 37, 14. “now hast thou thy desire,” John I, 176. Hml. V, 2, 14. “you have your wish,” H8 III, 2, 44. Cymb. III, 5, 20. “if my young lord your son have not the day,” H4B I, 1, 52. Hence == to have got, as a blow or wound: “you have it full, Benedick,” Ado I, 1, 110. “is he gone and hath nothing?” Rom. III, 1, 95. “I have it, and soundly too,” Rom. III, 1, 95 “then had you a cut,” Ant. I, 2, 173.
e) to hear, to see, to find, to enjoy in any manner: “let's ha't,” Shr. IV, 1, 61. “let's have a catch,” Tw. II, 3, 18. let me h. it (== tell it me) Wint. I, 2, 101. II, 1, 26. H8 II, 1, 145. “we'll ha't to-morrow night,” Hml. II, 2, 565. “will you ha' the truth on't?” V, 1, 26. “we will have more of this to-morrow,” Oth. I, 3, 379 (speak of it). “let's ha't,” Ant. II, 7, 111. “there shall you have me,” Tw. III, 3, 42 (meet me, find me). “she's neither fish nor flesh; a man knows not where to h. her,” H4A III, 3, 145 (nobody knows on what terms he is with her, how he ought to treat her; Germ.: “woran er mit ihr ist). thou shalt ha't,” Shr. V, 2, 181 (viz the kissing of Kate; or perhaps == thou shalt carry the prize).
f) to understand, to know, to be expert in: “have you the tongues?” Gent. IV, 1, 33. “he hath neither Latin, French nor Italian,” Merch. I, 2, 74. “I have the back-trick simply as strong as any man in Illyria,” Tw. I, 3, 131. “till he had both tune and words,” Wint. IV, 4, 619. “when she has so much English,” H8 V, 5, 15. “where have you this?” Ant. II, 1, 18.
Again == to have guessed, to have hit, to have found out: “when you find him out, you have him ever after,” All's III, 6, 101. “there thou hast it,” R3 IV, 2, 73. “you have it,” Tit. IV, 2, 24. “you have me; have you not?” Hml. II, 1, 68. “I ha't,” IV, 7, 157.
g) to experience, to suffer: “the heart hath treble wrong,” Ven. 329. “she had the wrong,” H6C IV, 1, 102. (cf. Wrong). “what foul play had we,” Tp. I, 2, 60. “let him have all the rigour of the law,” H6B I, 3, 199. “it smites me beneath the fall I have,” Ant. V, 2, 172.
h) to hold, to keep: “such sweet observance in this work was had,” Lucr. 1385. “hast the memory of Hermione in honour,” Wint V, 1, 50. “by that God that thou hast in reverence,” Tit. V, 1, 83. cf. Better, Best, Rather.
i) to be under an obligation; followed by an infinitive: “had his team to guide,” Ven. 179 and passim. “then had you indeed a cut, and the case to be lamented,” Ant. I, 2, 173 (the case had, or would have, to be lamented). Without an inf.: “now you have left your voices, I have no further with you,” Cor. II, 3, 181 (I have nothing more to do with you). Similarly: “I have nothing with this answer; these words are not mine,” Hml. III, 2, 101.
k) to cause, to let, to get, to see; followed by an inf. without to: “to have their sin remain untold,” Lucr. 753. “wouldst thou have me cast my love on him?” Gent. I, 2, 25. “which they would have the profferer construe Ay,” Gent. I, 2, 25 IV, 2, 70, IV, 2, 70 IV, 4, 112. V, 4, 35. Meas. I, 1, 15. III, 2, 3. Ado I, 1, 169. LLL IV, 3, 150. V, 1, 116. Mids. V, 158. Merch. II, 3, 8. II, 5, 50. As II, 3, 29. Tw. III, 4, 70. Wint. IV, 4, 806. H4B II, 1, 176. V, 2, 85. H6A V, 4, 70. H6B II, 1, 147. III, 1, 243. IV, 7, 145. H6C II, 6, 95. Cor. II, 2, 79. III, 2, 17. Tim. III, 1, 27. Caes. IV, 3, 243. Ant. V, 2, 11 etc. By an inf. with to: “what would your Grace have me to do in this?” Gent. III, 1, 80. “I would not have you to think,” Tw. V, 49. Cor. II, 2, 73. IV, 2, 36. Caes. II, 2, 38. Oth. IV, 2, 237. to omitted and inserted: “I wish no better than have him hold that purpose and to put it in execution,” Cor. II, 1, 256. Followed by a partic. pass.: “this dumb play had his acts made plain with tears,” Ven. 359. “the waves will have him seen no more,” Ven. 359 “the threshold grates the door to have him heard,” Lucr. 306. “shalt have thy trespass cited up in rhymes,” Lucr. 306 “age in love loves not to have years told,” Sonn. 138, 12. Gent. II, 1, 134. II, 4, 123. III, 1, 98. IV, 4, 106. Wiv. II, 2, 73. III, 5, 7. IV, 2, 216. V, 5, 38. Meas. II, 1, 214. Meas. II, 1, 214 III, 2, 187. IV, 2, 175. Err. IV, 4, 149. Ado III, 5, 51. LLL I, 2, 120. Merch. IV, 1, 46. As II, 1, 25. IV, 1, 97. IV, 1, 97 Tw. II, 5, 158. Wint. II, 3, 114. H6A I, 4, 37. III, 1, 83. III, 1, 83 III, 3, 15. R3 IV, 2, 19. Troil. II, 2, 148. Ant. III, 13, 88 etc. Irregular position of the partic.: “the gods will have fulfilled their purposes,” Wint. V, 1, 36 (instead of: will have their purposes fulfilled). “desire him to have borne his helmet before him,” H5 V Chor. H5 V Chor. cf. “to know what she would have given,” Wiv. II, 2, 208. “with sainted vow my faults to have amended,” All's III, 4, 7. Inversely: “which has my evils conjured to remembrance,” Wint. V, 3, 39 (== has conjured my evils). Followed by a noun or an adverb.: “I had rather have it a head,” Err. II, 2, 36. “I will have it no lay,” Cymb. I, 4, 159. “we'll have you merry,” Gent. IV, 2, 30. “thrice is he armed that hath his quarrel just,” H6B III, 2, 233. “I would not have it so,” Meas. I, 2, 71. “to have me home to dinner,” Err. II, 2, 10. “to have my love to bed and to arise,” Mids. III, 1, 174. “have by some surgeon,” Merch. IV, 1, 257 (cause to be present). “we'll have thee to a couch,” Shr. Ind. 2, 39. “if I were covetous, as he will have me,” H6A III, 1, 30. “when Oxford had me down,” R3 II, 1, 112. “I would be sure to have all well,” Tit. V, 3, 31. “I would have had thee there,” Caes. II, 4, 4. “what wouldst thou have to Athens?” Tim. IV, 3, 287 (what commission have you to Athens?).
l) Joined to adverbs and prepositions; 1) have after == I'll follow, or let us follow: Hml. I, 4, 89. 2) have at it == I'll begin it, attempt it: “have at it with you,” Wint. IV, 4, 302 (I'll sing it with you). “have at it then, by leave,” Cymb. V, 5, 315 (I'll tell my story). have at you, properly == my aim is at you; hence == I speak to you, listen: “have at you, then, affection's men at arms,” LLL IV, 3, 290. Oftener == I shall hit you, take care, be warned: “have at thee with a downright blow,” H6B II, 3, 92. “now have at him,” IV, 2, 129. “and so have at thee,” H6C II, 4, 11. “have at you,” H8 III, 2, 309. V, 3, 113. “have at thee,” Troil. V, 4, 24. “have at you both,” V, 6, 11. “have at thee,” V, 6, 11 Rom. I, 1, 79. V, 3, 70. Hml. V, 2, 313. Used in a fight of words: “have at you with a proverb,” Err. III, 1, 51. Err. III, 1, 51 “have at you for a bitter jest,” Shr. V, 2, 45. “have at the very eye of that proverb,” H5 III, 7, 129. “have at you with my wit,” Rom. IV, 5, 125. cf. “he that will caper with me for a thousand marks, let him lend me the money, and have at him,” H4B I, 2, 217. Substantively: “I'll venture one have at him,” H8 II, 2, 85. 3) have to it == I will, or let us, set to it: “and then have to it afresh,” Shr. I, 1, 143. “have to my widow,” IV, 5, 78. “ha' to thee, lad,” V, 2, 37 (== I drink to you, I pledge you). 4) have through == I'll take my way through: “have through the very middest of you,” H6B IV, 8, 63 (cf. Euphues' Golden Legacy, ed. Collier, p. 52: I will have amongst you with my sword). 5) have with thee or with you == take me with you, I'll go with you: Wiv. II, 1, 161. Wiv. II, 1, 161 Wiv. II, 1, 161 III, 2, 93. LLL IV, 2, 151. As I, 2, 268. H6A II, 4, 114. R3 III, 2, 92. Troil. V, 2, 185. Cor. II, 1, 286. Oth. I, 2, 53. Cymb. IV, 4, 50.
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