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Hear (impf. and partic. heard), 1) to perceive by the ear; trans. with a simple accus.: “do you not h. him?” Tp. I, 1, 14. “when I arrived and --d thee,” I, 2, 292. I, 2, 292 I, 2, 292 II, 1, 311. II, 1, 311 II, 1, 311 Merch. I, 2, 52. IV, 1, 149 etc. etc. “he has --d that word of some great man,” Tw. IV, 1, 12. Followed by an inf. without to: “which thou --dst cry,” Tp. I, 2, 32. “to h. thee speak of Naples,” Tp. I, 2, 32 III, 1, 63. IV, 50. Meas. I, 2, 18. Tim. IV, 2, 21. Hml. IV, 1, 9. Cymb. V, 5, 161 etc. etc. “I have --d say,” Meas. IV, 2, 38. H4B I, 2, 108. Cor. II, 2, 74. Per. IV, 6, 86. “have you not --d speak of Mariana,” Meas. III, 1, 216. Inf. with to: “who --d me to deny it,” Err. V, 25. “I had rather h. you to solicit that,” Tw. III, 1, 120. “--d a voice to call him so,” H6B II, 1, 94. Followed by a partic.: “I have --d it said,” Wint. IV, 4, 86. H6A II, 2, 55. Cor. IV, 3, 33. “her shall you h. disproved,” Meas. V, 161. “who hath not --d it spoken,” H4B IV, 2, 16. “h. her exampled by herself,” H5 I, 2, 156. H8 II, 1, 32. Epil. H8 II, 1, 32 Cor. I, 9, 29. II, 2, 81 etc. Absol.: Tw. II, 3, 58. H4A II, 1, 32. Caes. I, 2, 58 etc. in one's --ing == in one's presence, so as to be heard by: “in my --ing be you mute and dumb,” Lucr. 1123. “in the --ing of these many friends,” Merch. V, 241. “in --ing of all these ears,” H8 II, 4, 145. “to brave the tribune in his brothers' --ing,” Tit. IV, 2, 36. Hml. IV, 7, 73. Cymb. I, 4, 35. within --ing == near enough to be able to hear: Gent. II, 1, 8. H4B II, 4, 337. out of h. == too far to be able to hear: Mids. II, 2, 152. “no --ing, no feeling,” Wint. IV, 4, 625. “my sense of --ing,” LLL III, 1, 2 and V, 2, 670 (Armado's speeches).
Hearing, substantively, == the sense by which sounds are perceived, the ear: “would I had no --ing,” Ven. 428. “her grievance with his --ing to divide,” Compl. 67. “terrible to enter human --ing,” Tp. I, 2, 265. “out of your wits and --ing too,” III, 2, 87. “take her --ing prisoner,” Ado I, 1, 326. “it pays the --ing double recompense,” Mids. III, 2, 180. “hard of --ing,” Shr. II, 184. “speak to his gentle --ing kind commends,” R2 III, 3, 126. “these exactions are most pestilent to the --ing,” H8 I, 2, 49. “make joyful the --ing of my wife,” Mcb. I, 4, 46. “where --ing should not latch them,” IV, 3, 195. “lend thy serious --ing to what I shall unfold,” Hml. I, 5, 5. “you lie, up to the --ing of the gods,” Ant. V, 2, 95. “prevailed on thy too ready --ing,” Cymb. III, 2, 6. “fill the bores of --ing,” Cymb. III, 2, 6 “no more offend our --ing,” V, 4, 94. Plur. “younger --ings are quite ravished,” LLL II, 75.
2) to give allowance to speak, to attend, to listen, to lend ear to; absol.: “dost thou h.?” Tp. I, 2, 106. Gent. I, 1, 99. Shr. V, 1, 136 etc. “whose remembrance will to ears and tongues be theme and --ing ever,” Cymb. III, 1, 4. “h. you, my lords,” Ado V, 1, 47. Shr. II, 242. Troil. II, 3, 121. Hml. V, 1, 14. “h. thee, Gratiano,” Merch. II, 2, 189. --ing, substantively, == audience, attention: “if you will give me the --ing,” Wiv. II, 2, 183. H5 I, 1, 93. H6A III, 1, 28. V, 3, 106. Cymb. V, 5, 116. “I'll vouchsafe thee the --ing,” Wiv. II, 2, 45. “vouchsafe me --ing,” H4A IV, 3, 31. “leave me to my --ing,” Tw. III, 1, 104. “of whom I have deserved this --ing,” Tim. II, 2, 207. “we beg your --ing,” Hml. III, 2, 161.
Trans.: “the tiger would gently h. him,” Ven. 1096. Lucr. 495. Tp. II, 1, 190. Meas. III, 1, 148. Ado I, 3, 6. Tw. I, 5, 176. Tw. I, 5, 176 H4B V, 5, 100 etc. “h. me with patience but to speak a word,” Rom. III, 5, 160. “h. me what I say,” H5 II, 1, 67. H6C II, 6, 63. Ant. V, 1, 51. “h. me a little,” Ado IV, 1, 157. “h. me this,” Tw. V, 123. “h. me one single word,” All's V, 2, 37. H6C I, 1, 170. Tit. II, 3, 138. Lr. V, 1, 39. “h. me this prayer,” Ant. I, 2, 70. “to-morrow we'll h. ourselves again,” Mcb. III, 4, 32 (we'll speak the matter over again; cf. Ourselves).
3) to be hearer, auditor of: “I will h. that play,” Mids. V, 81. “his honour never --d a play,” Shr. Ind. 1, 96. 2, 136. 2, 136. Hml. II, 2, 560. III, 2, 51. III, 2, 51 “I have --d it over,” Mids. V, 77. “a lord will h. you play,” Shr. Ind. 1, 93. “'tis a good --ing when children are toward: but a harsh --ing when women are froward,” Shr. V, 2, 182 (== 'tis a pleasant spectacle). Used of arts and science: “unfit to h. moral philosophy,” Troil. II, 2, 167. “he --s no music,” Caes. I, 2, 204 (pays no attention to m.).
4) to learn, to be told, to receive information about; trans.: “until her husband's welfare she did h.” Lucr. 263. “the blackest news that ever thou --dest,” Gent. III, 1, 286. II, 1, 145. LLL I, 1, 287. IV, 1, 97. Mids. IV, 1, 138. Merch. II, 8, 33. Shr. Ind. 2, 131. I, 2, 189. Wint. I, 2, 424. Caes. II, 2, 34. Hml. III, 2, 242 etc. “I --d no letter from my master since I wrote him,” Cymb. IV, 3, 36 (== notajot? not a syllable?) “let those cities . . . h. these tears,” Per. I, 4, 54 (be informed of them). “who since I --d to be discomfited,” H6B V, 1, 63. “I never --d the absent duke much detected for women,” Meas. III, 2, 129. “h. your own dignity so much profaned,” H4B V, 2, 93. “you shall h. the legions sooner landed,” Cymb. II, 4, 17. I have --d == I have been told: Wiv. II, 1, 230. Mids. I, 1, 111. Merch. IV, 1, 6. R2 II, 3, 54. Lr. II, 1, 89. Ant. II, 6, 47 etc.
Absol.: “I am sorry you must h.” Ado IV, 1, 89. “as I --d in Genoa,” Merch. III, 1, 103. none (news) “good to please you with the --ing,” R3 IV, 4, 458. With from: “to Milan let me h. from thee,” Gent. I, 1, 57. II, 4, 103. Meas. V, 223. Ado V, 1, 151. V, 2, 58. Merch. V, 35 etc. “'tis not four days gone since I --d thence,” Cor. I, 2, 7. With of: “you have not --d of the proclamation?” Meas. I, 2, 95. “we will h. further of it by your daughter,” Ado II, 3, 213 (cf. Cymb. II, 4, 77). IV, 1, 194. Mids. IV, 2, 3. R2 II, 1, 234. H6A III, 4, 2. H6B III, 1, 122. R3 I, 3, 184. H8 III, 2, 435 etc. “as you h. of me, so think of me,” Ado IV, 1, 338. “of whom I h. so well,” Shr. IV, 4, 37. Tim. III, 6, 29. from and “of:” Cor. IV, 1, 52.
I hear == I have heard, I have been told: “I h. not of him in the court,” Wiv. IV, 3, 6. “I h. you are a scholar,” II, 2, 186. “I h. your grace hath sworn,” LLL II, 104. “do you h. whether Antonio have had any loss?” Merch. III, 1, 44. “as I h., he was much bound to you,” V, 137. “and fled, as he --s since, to Burgundy,” H6C IV, 6, 79. “h. you the news abroad?” R3 II, 3, 3. “last night, I h., they lay at Northampton,” II, 4, 1. “I h. the Marquis Dorset's fled,” IV, 2, 46. “I h. that news,” IV, 2, 46 “h. you of it?” Tim. III, 6, 60. “I h. it by the way,” Mcb. III, 4, 130. Lr. II, 1, 107 (Qq heard). Ant. III, 7, 78. Cymb. IV, 3, 38 etc.
5) to attend judicially, to try in a court of law: “the council shall h. it,” Wiv. I, 1, 35. “leave you to the --ing of the cause,” Meas. II, 1, 141. “he's --ing of a cause,” II, 2, 1 (cf. Of). “to have --ing of this business,” III, 1, 210. “to h. this matter forth,” V, 255. “to h. the cause betwixt her and this great offender,” H8 V, 3, 120. Cor. II, 1, 78. Cor. II, 1, 78 V, 6, 128.
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