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Heart, 1) the muscular viscus in the thorax which propels the blood through the arteries: Ven. 167. Gent. IV, 1, 51. Meas. II, 4, 20. Ado II, 3, 153. III, 4, 74. IV, 1, 309. Mids. II, 2, 149. Merch. III, 1, 132. IV, 1, 233 etc. Considered as the seat of any affection or emotion: “when the --'s attorney once is mute,” Ven. 335. “mine eye and h. are at a mortal war,” Sonn. 46, 1. “the cry did knock against my very h.” Tp. I, 2, 9. “my h. bleeds,” Tp. I, 2, 9 Gent. I, 1, 69. I, 2, 63. I, 3, 46. IV, 2, 65. IV, 3, 19. IV, 3, 19 Wiv. II, 2, 301. Mids. I, 2, 73; cf. H4B III, 2, 54. H6C III, 3, 14. Rom. IV, 5, 102 etc. etc. “prays from his h.” Ado I, 1, 153 (as he is affected, sincerely); cf. Rom. III, 5, 228. “that with his very h. despiseth me,” Gent. IV, 4, 99. “I am pale at mine h. to see thine eyes so red,” Meas. IV, 3, 158. “your brother's death sits at your h.” V, 394. “since you do take it so at h.” Merch. V, 145; Tw. III, 4, 112. “I am glad at h.” Wint. III, 3, 14. “my father's disposition sticks me at h.” As I, 2, 254. “grieves at h.” H4A V, 4, 29. “some sudden qualm hath struck me at the h.” H6B I, 1, 54. “'tis warm at's h.” Cor. II, 3, 160. “touched at very h.” Cymb. I, 1, 10. “the nobles receive so to h. the banishment of Coriolanus,” Cor. IV, 3, 22. “I take all and your several visitations so kind to h.” Tim. I, 2, 225. “why should we in our peevish opposition take it to h.” Hml. I, 2, 101 etc. Hence == temper, disposition, sentiments: “thy hard h.” Ven. 375. Ven. 375 Ven. 375 Ado I, 1, 128 etc. “a kind h.” Wiv. III, 4, 106 etc. “a light h.” LLL V, 2, 18. “a merry h.” Ado II, 1, 325. H4B V, 3, 50. “my wild h.” Ado III, 1, 112. “a corrupted h.” Wiv. V, 5, 91. “your piteous h.” Tp. I, 2, 14. “waxen --s,” Tw. II, 2, 31. “proud h.” H6A IV, 3, 24. “unyielding h.” Ven. 423. “the white cold virgin snow upon my h.” Tp. IV, 55. “not changing h. with habit,” Meas. V, 389. “not with better h.” Err. III, 1, 29. “thrust virtue out of our --s,” Wiv. V, 5, 156. “liver, brain and h.” Tw. I, 1, 37 (i. e. the organs of desire, of thought, and of sentiment). “the liver, h. and brain of Britain,” Cymb. V, 5, 14. cf. Merch. I, 1, 82. “you must bear; the h. is all,” H4B V, 3, 32. “had I the h. to do it,” Tw. V, 120. “have you the h.?” John IV, 1, 41. “cursed be the h. that had the h. to do it,” R3 I, 2, 15. “you scarcely have the --s to tell me so,” I, 4, 180. I, 4, 180 “how hast thou the h. to mangle me,” Rom. III, 3, 48.
Supposed to be the prompter of will and inclination: “set all --s i' the state to what tune pleased his ear,” Tp. I, 2, 84. “you shall have revenges to your h.” Meas. IV, 3, 140. “h. and good will you might have sent,” Err. IV, 4, 88. “set your h. at rest,” Mids. II, 1, 121. “if I could bid the fifth welcome with so good a h.” Merch. I, 2, 141. “as good as h. can wish,” H4A I, 1, 13. “as h. would desire,” II, 4, 26. “they had no h. to fight,” H6C II, 1, 135. “you shall fight your --s out ere I part you,” Troil. III, 2, 55. “say against their --s,” Cor. I, 9, 8. “it is against my h.” Tim. III, 4, 21. “set not thy sweet h. on proud array,” Lr. III, 4, 85 (Ff sweet-heart) etc. in h. == heartily, sincerely, earnestly: “dost thou not wish in h.” LLL V, 2, 55. “in h. desiring still you may behold confusion of your foes,” H6A IV, 1, 76. “loved her so dear in h.” H8 II, 2, 111. Tim. I, 2, 54. “I could find in my h. to beat him,” Tp. II, 2, 160. Err. IV, 4, 160. Ado I, 1, 127. III, 5, 24. As II, 4, 4. H4A II, 4, 56. “if they can find in their --s the poor knight shall be further afflicted,” Wiv. IV, 2, 232. “I cannot yet find in my h. to repent,” All's II, 5, 13. with one's h. == from a true impulse of the mind, sincerely: “I thank you always with my h.” Wiv. I, 1, 86. “ay, with my h.” Meas. V, 239. “a blister on his tongue, with my h.” LLL V, 2, 335. “I am sure you hate me with your --s,” Mids. III, 2, 154. “those parts that you love with your h.” H5 V, 2, 214. “as I love Hastings with my h.” R3 II, 1, 17. “hate a lord with my h.” Tim. I, 1, 237. “with all my h.:” Err. V, 407. Mids. III, 2, 164. Merch. III, 2, 197. III, 4, 35. IV, 1, 147. As III, 2, 454. III, 5, 136. V, 3, 3. Shr. Ind. 1, 83. IV, 4, 67. All's II, 3, 230. John I, 270. IV, 2, 180. H4A III, 1, 223. H6A II, 3, 81. R3 I, 2, 220. II, 4, 4. III, 1, 111. III, 2, 111. Tim. III, 6, 27. Hml. III, 1, 24. Oth. I, 3, 193 etc. “do it with all thy h.” Ado IV, 1, 287. “with all our --s,” R3 II, 2, 145. “forgave him with all their --s,” Caes. I, 2, 276.
Principally the seat of love and amorous desire: Ven. 374. Ven. 374 Ven. 374 Lucr. 435. Tp. III, 1, 65. Tp. III, 1, 65 Wiv. IV, 6, 51. V, 5, 101. LLL III, 37. LLL III, 37 V, 2, 278 etc. etc. “so much in the h. of the world,” As I, 1, 175. “if you do love Rosalind so near the h.” V, 2, 69. Opposed to the head: Merch. III, 2, 64.
Considered as the motive of activity, == courage, spirit: “'tis the h., Master Page,” Wiv. II, 1, 235. “no greater h. in thee?” As II, 6, 4. “our --s should be as good,” H4B IV, 1, 157. “nothing so full of h.” Troil. I, 3, 239. “what h. receives from hence the conquering part,” Troil. I, 3, 239 “boldness comes to me now and brings me h.” III, 2, 121. “men of h. looked wondering,” Cor. V, 6, 99. “despite thy valour and thy h.” Lr. V, 3, 133. “where hast thou been, my h.?” Ant. III, 13, 172. “a diminution in our captain's brain restores his h.” Ant. III, 13, 172 “out of h.” LLL III, 46. H4A III, 3, 6. cold h. == cowardice, H4A IV, 3, 7 (cf. Cold). “to give h.” H6B IV, 4, 35. “to have good h.” Ant. V, 1, 56. “to put in h.” Shr. IV, 5, 77. “to take h.” Caes. IV, 3, 288. Ant. IV, 15, 85. “take a good h.” As IV, 3, 174. Used as a compellation: “my h. of elder,” Wiv. II, 3, 30. “great h.” H4A V, 4, 87.
Used for the soul, the mind in general: “my h. misgives me,” Wiv. V, 5, 226. “ask your h. what it doth know,” Meas. II, 2, 137. “my h. will not confess it,” All's II, 1, 8. “half the h. of Caesar, worthy Mecaenas,” Ant. II, 2, 175. “it angered him to the h.” H4B II, 4, 9. “anger her to the h.” III, 2, 217. “stoop to the h.” Cor. III, 2, 32 (M. Edd. herd). “he lies to the h.” Oth. V, 2, 156 (== consciously). “beshrew your h.” H4B II, 3, 45. Troil. IV, 2, 29 (cf. Beshrew). “blessing of your h.” Gent. III, 1, 306. “blessing on his h.” R2 V, 5, 64. my h. used as an exclamation: Wint. IV, 4, 435. H6B I, 3, 221. Caes. V, 3, 58. Sometimes almost == life: “they have murdered this poor h. of mine,” Ven. 502. “a man may draw his h. out, ere a pluck one,” All's I, 3, 93. “the king has killed his h.” H5 II, 1, 93. “almost broke my h. with laughter,” Tit. V, 1, 113 (cf. Break). “to prove upon thy h., thou liest,” Lr. V, 3, 140. for one's h. == for one's life: “I could not for my h. deny it him,” Merch. V, 165. “could not get him for my h. to do it,” Shr. I, 2, 38. “cannot take two from twenty for his h.” Cymb. II, 1, 60. “my h. is sick,” John V, 3, 4 (== I feel ill). “being strong at h.” As IV, 3, 152 (having recovered from a swoon). “'tis bitter cold, and I am sick at h.” Hml. I, 1, 9. “I am sick at h. when I behold . . .,” Mcb. V, 3, 19; cf. the quibble in LLL V, 2, 278.
Sometimes even == the mind as the power of thinking: it (the eye) “no form delivers to the h. of bird, of flower,” Sonn. 113, 5. “tongue far from h.” Meas. I, 4, 33. “what his h. thinks his tongue speaks,” Ado III, 2, 14. “if I would think my h. out of thinking,” III, 4, 85. “as h. can think,” H4A IV, 1, 84. “lay it to thy h.” Mcb. I, 5, 15. Cor. II, 3, 212. “lay hand on h., advise,” Rom. III, 5, 192. “would h. of man once think it?” Hml. I, 5, 121. “if I had played the desk or table-book, or given my h. a winking,” II, 2, 137. by h. == by rote: LLL III, 36. V, 2, 98.
2) Serving as a kind and familiar compellation to persons: “h., you swear like a comfit-maker's wife,” H4A III, 1, 252. “take it, h.” Cymb. I, 1, 112. “I speak to thee, my h.” H4B V, 5, 50. “my --s,” Tp. I, 1, 6. Wiv. III, 2, 88. Tw. II, 3, 16. Rom. I, 5, 88. Ant. IV, 2, 41. “where are these --s?” Mids. IV, 2, 26. “dear h.” Sonn. 95, 13. 139, 6. Tp. I, 2, 305. Tw. II, 3, 109. Tit. III, 1, 211. “good h.” Wiv. II, 2, 94. III, 5, 39. IV, 5, 115. LLL IV, 3, 153. Rom. I, 1, 190. “good --s,” Tp. I, 1, 29. Wiv. IV, 2, 75. “there's a merry h.” H4B V, 3, 24. “noble h.” Oth. I, 3, 303. “old h.” H5 IV, 1, 34. “poor h.” H5 II, 1, 123. R3 IV, 1, 88. Tit. III, 1, 251. “my profound h.” Tw. I, 5, 195. “sweet h.” LLL V, 1, 110. “sweet --s,” V, 2, 1. V, 2, 1 “--s of gold,” H4A II, 4, 307 etc.
3) the inmost and most vital part, the core, the very essence: “her bare breast, the h. of all her land,” Lucr. 439. “here is the h. of my purpose,” Wiv. II, 2, 233. “a goodly apple rotten at the h.” Merch. I, 3, 102. “the h. of my message,” Tw. I, 5, 203. “in the h. of France,” H6B I, 1, 196. IV, 8, 38. H6C II, 2, 150 “my life itself and the best h. of it thanks you for this great care,” H8 I, 2, 1. “flawed the h. of all their loyalties,” H8 I, 2, 1 “to stick the h. of falsehood,” Troil. III, 2, 202. “from h. of very h., great Hector, welcome,” IV, 5, 171. cf. “in my --'s core, in my h. of h.” Hml. III, 2, 78. “Aufidius, their very h. of hope,” Cor. I, 6, 55. “he outgoes the very h. of kindness,” Tim. I, 1, 286. “this was, O world, the h. of thee,” Caes. III, 1, 208. “you would pluck out the h. of my mystery,” Hml. III, 2, 382. “shake in pieces the h. of his obedience,” Lr. I, 2, 92. “beguiled me to the very h. of loss,” Ant. IV, 12, 29.
Peculiarities: used as a masc. in Sonn. 46, 5. 47, 4. All's II, 1, 8. Without the article: Meas. I, 4, 33. Mids. V, 304. H4A IV, 1, 84. H4B I, 1, 13. II, 4, 26. H6C III, 3, 14. Hml. I, 5, 121. Quibbling with hart (q. v.): As III, 2, 260. Tw. I, 1, 17. IV, 1, 63. Caes. III, 1, 208.
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