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Heel, subst. (used only of men, horses and asses) 1) the hind part of the foot: Wiv. III, 5, 113. Shr. IV, 1, 15. Wint. IV, 4, 229. H4B I, 1, 44. Troil. II, 1, 53. Rom. III, 1, 39. Cymb. IV, 4, 40. Applied to persons attended or pursued by others: “follow my --s,” Wiv. I, 4, 132. Ant. IV, 5, 6. “eye your master's --s,” Wiv. III, 2, 4. “danger dogs the --s of worth,” All's III, 4, 15. “to dog his --s and curtsy at his frowns,” H4A III, 2, 127. “after the admired --s of Bolingbroke,” H4B I, 3, 105; cf. Wiv. I, 4, 62. “to tend on Hector's --s,” Troil. IV, 4, 148. “page thy --s,” Tim. IV, 3, 224. “we will grace his --s,” Caes. III, 1, 120. at one's --s == behind one: “with Ringwood at thy --s,” Wiv. II, 1, 122. II, 3, 102. III, 3, 122. III, 5, 76. Err. V, 81. Tw. II, 5, 149. III, 4, 324. John V, 7, 80. H4b I, 2, 18. H5 V Chor. H5 V Chor. H6B IV, 3, 14. Troil. III, 2, 2. V, 8, 6. Oth. I, 2, 42. Ant. I, 4, 58. at the --s: “dog them at the --s,” R2 V, 3, 139. “pages followed him even at the --s,” H4A IV, 3, 73. H4B I, 3, 80. H5 IV, 7, 179. R3 IV, 1, 40 (Ff thy --s). Cor. I, 4, 49. Caes. II, 4, 34. Mcb. I, 6, 21. Metaphorically: “here follow her vices, close at the --s of her virtues,” Gent. III, 1, 325. “is there no sequel at the --s of this mother's admiration?” Hml. III, 2, 341. “at h. of that defy him,” Ant. II, 2, 160 (cf. at foot). on the h. or --s == immediately after: “on the catastrophe and h. of pastime,” All's I, 2, 57. “when comes your book forth? upon the --s of my presentment,” Tim. I, 1, 27. to tread on the --s == to follow close: “with many hundreds treading on his --s,” John IV, 2, 149. “when April on the h. of limping winter treads,” Rom. I, 2, 27. “one woe doth tread upon another's h.” Hml. IV, 7, 164.
2) the whole foot (pars pro toto): “keep from my --s and beware of an ass,” Err. III, 1, 18; cf. Tim. I, 1, 282. ye light o' love, with your --s (i. e. by dancing) Ado III, 4, 47; cf. V, 4, 121; H5 III, 5, 34; Rom. I, 4, 36. your wit was made of Atalanta's --s (being so nimble) As III, 2, 294. Wint. IV, 4, 695. John IV, 2, 174. H4A II, 4, 480. H5 II Chor. H5 II Chor. IV, 7, 83. H6A I, 4, 108. H6B IV, 10, 86. Troil. II, 2, 44. Tit. IV, 3, 44. Hml. IV, 5, 32. V, 1, 152. cf. Lr. I, 5, 8 and Wiv. I, 3, 34. “at his --s, leashed in like hounds,” Wiv. I, 3, 34. “spaniel'd me at --s,” Ant. IV, 12, 21. his --s have deserved it (to sit in the stocks) All's IV, 3, 118. to punish you by the --s (i. e. to set you in the stocks) H4B I, 2, 141. “I'll lay ye all by the --s,” H8 V, 4, 83. to trip up a person's --s == to throw him to the ground: As III, 2, 225. Lr. II, 2, 32. cf. “trip him, that his --s may kick at heaven,” Hml. III, 3, 93. “beating his kind embracements with her --s,” Ven. 312 (== kicking at them). cf. “I scorn that with my --s,” Ado III, 4, 51. “scorn running with thy --s,” Merch. II, 2, 10. “I am almost out at --s,” Wiv. I, 3, 34 (in desolate circumstances). “a good man's fortune may grow out at --s,” Lr. II, 2, 164. my --s are at your command == I will run as you advise me to do: Merch. II, 2, 33. show it a fair pair of --s (== to flee): H4A II, 4, 53. to trust their --s (to flee) Mcb. I, 2, 30. to take h. == to take to flight: Cymb. V, 3, 67. “I'll take my --s,” Err. I, 2, 94. “betake me to my --s,” H6B IV, 8, 67. “--from head to h.” Wint. IV, 4, 229.
3) the hind part of a shoe: Shr. IV, 1, 136.
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