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Intend, 1) to tend, to be apt: “and i. to chide myself even for this time I spend in talking to thee,” Gent. IV, 2, 103. “any thing that --s to laughter,” H4B I, 2, 9 (Ff tends).
2) to bend, to direct: “my thoughts i. a zealous pilgrimage to thee,” Sonn. 27, 6. “as they did battery to the spheres i.” Compl. 23. “if he should i. this voyage towards my wife,” Wiv. II, 1, 188. “if thou dost i. never so little show of love to her,” Mids. III, 2, 333. “the king is set forth, or hitherwards --ed speedily,” H4A IV, 1, 92. “Caesar through Syria --s his journey,” Ant. V, 2, 201. “and to Tarsus i. my travel,” Per. I, 2, 116.
3) to mean, to design, to purpose; absol.: “as I i.” LLL V, 2, 429. “after the measure as you --ed well,” Cor. V, 1, 47. “as I --ed,” Rom. V, 3, 245. “I i. so,” Oth. IV, 1, 173. With an obj.: Gent. III, 1, 18. IV, 3, 44. V, 2, 41. Meas. V, 154. Ado I, 3, 47. II, 2, 46. LLL V, 2, 155. Mids. III, 2, 12. John V, 4, 61. R2 V, 3, 33. H5 II, 2, 6. H5 II, 2, 6 H6B III, 1, 265. IV, 4, 37. V, 1, 56. V, 1, 56 R3 III, 1, 158. III, 5, 70. III, 5, 70. II, 4, 235. Cor. V, 2, 49. Tit. I, 78. II, 1, 122. Caes. III, 1, 151. Hml. II, 1, 5. Lr. I, 1, 228. Oth. IV, 1, 119. Followed by for: “--s you for his swift ambassador,” Meas. III, 1, 58 (== to be). “what I i. for thee,” John III, 3, 68 (in thy favour). By to or a simple dative: “here's no harm --ed to thee,” Wint. IV, 4, 642. R3 IV, 4, 237. Troil. II, 2, 39. Caes. III, 1, 90. Lr. V, 1, 66. By towards: “any harm's --ed towards him,” Caes. II, 4, 31. By upon: “the goodness I i. upon you,” Lr. V, 1, 7. Governing an inf.: “he --s to hunt the boar,” Ven. 587. Lucr. Arg. Ven. 587 Gent. III, 1, 11. Shr. Ind. I, 29. Shr. Ind. I, 29 Tw. V, 155. Wint. V, 2, 112. John V, 1, 55. H4A V, 2, 94. H6A I, 1, 176. I, 3, 88. III, 1, 4. H6B III, 2, 16. H6B III, 2, 16 H6C I, 2, 50. II, 5, 139. IV, 2, 25. R3 IV, 4, 263 (Qq mean). Troil. IV, 1, 78. Cor. I, 1, 60. II, 2, 159. V, 6, 7. Tit. IV, 1, 116. Rom. V, 3, 34. Lr. I, 1, 240. Oth. V, 2, 64. Ant. V, 2, 186. Inf. without to: “how long within this wood i. you stay?” Mids. II, 1, 138 (perhaps subst.).
4) to mean, to purport, to understand: “that is --ed in the general's name,” H4B IV, 1, 166. “so help me God, as I dissemble not! So help me God, as I i. it not,” H6A III, 1, 141 (do not mean what my words express). “I speak no more than what my soul --s,” H6C III, 2, 94. “how i. you, practised?” Ant. II, 2, 40. Used by Dr. Caius even in the sense of to understand == the French entendre: “i. vat I speak,” Wiv. I, 4, 47.
5) to wish: “as I i. to thrive in this new world,” R2 IV, 78. “as my soul --s to live with that dread king,” H6B III, 2, 153. “as I i. to thrive to-day,” H6B V, 2, 17. “as I i. to prosper and repent,” R3 IV, 4, 397. Followed by a subordinate clause with shall: “he doth i. she shall be England's queen:” H6A V, 1, 45. Gent. II, 6, 39. Wiv. IV, 6, 38 (cf. Intent).
6) to pretend: “--ing weariness with heavy spright,” Lucr. 121. “i. a kind of zeal both to the prince and Claudio,” Ado II, 2, 35. “I i. that all is done in care of her,” Shr. IV, 1, 206. “--ing deep suspicion,” R3 III, 5, 8. “i. some fear,” III, 7, 45. “--ing other serious matters,” Tim. II, 2, 219.
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