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Keep, vb. (impf. and partic. kept. 2dperson “keptest:” Alls V, 3, 330), I. trans. 1) to hold, to retain, not to part with: “k. still possession of thy gloomy place,” Lucr. 803. “she may detain, but not still k., her treasure,” Sonn. 126, 10. “if I k. them, I needs must lose myself,” Gent. II, 6, 20. “I will k. my sides to myself,” Wiv. V, 5, 28. the saddler had it (the money), “I kept it not,” Err. I, 2, 57. “k. thy Hermia,” Mids. III, 2, 169. “the impressure thy palm some moment --s,” As III, 5, 24. “you might k. that check,” As IV, 1, 169 (i. e. suppress it, not utter it). “k. your hundred pounds to yourself,” Shr. V, 1, 24. “k. it to yourself,” Alls I, 3, 128 (do not speak of it); cf. H6B I, 2, 53 and R3 III, 2, 104. to “k. them on,” Alls II, 4, 18 (to have them in future). “k. your purse,” Tw. I, 5, 303. “might have kept this calf from all the world,” John I, 123 (might have retained it, though all the world claimed it). “so I may k. mine eyes,” IV, 1, 102. “I will not k. her long,” R3 I, 2, 230. “in honourable --ing her,” Troil. II, 2, 149. “k: seat,” Mcb. III, 4, 54. “he that --s nor crust nor crum,” Lr. I, 4, 217. “but kept a reservation,” II, 4, 255 (whereas everything else was given away). “to k. her still, and men in awe,” II, 4, 255 (used in two significations: to retain her possession, and to deter men from wooing her) etc.
2) to guard: “under twenty locks kept fast,” Ven. 575. “the honey which thy chaste bee kept,” Lucr. 840. “whoe'er --s me, let my heart be his guard,” Sonn. 133, 11. them (the sheep) “to k.” Tp. IV, 1, 63. “the key whereof myself have ever kept,” Gent. III, 1, 36. “keys kept safe,” Gent. III, 1, 36 “heaven k. your honour,” Meas. II, 2, 42; II, 4, 34; Ado V, 1, 332; As I, 1, 168; H4B III, 2, 308; Cor. IV, 6, 25; Ant. III, 2, 36. “your money that I had to k.” Err. I, 2, 8. “k. the gate,” II, 2, 208. “--s the prison,” IV, 3, 17. “that you k. Costard safe,” LLL I, 2, 133; cf. Meas. II, 2, 157. “the house doth k. itself,” As IV, 3, 82; Cymb. III, 6, 36. “I hope your own grace will k. you where you are,” Alls III, 5, 28. “I'll keep my stables where I lodge my wife,” Wint. II, 1, 134 (cf. Ado III, 4, 48. Antigonus may be in dread of the coachman). “k. this boy,” John III, 2, 5. “I'll k. him so, that he shall not offend your majesty,” III, 3, 64. “to k. him safely till his day of trial,” R2 IV, 153. “who --s the gate here?” H4B I, 1, 1. “had all our quarters been as safely kept,” H6A II, 1, 63. “commit you to my lord cardinal to k.” H6B III, 1, 138. “you had the good lord to k.” III, 2, 183. “I'll k. London with my soldiers,” H6C I, 1, 207. “must gently be preserved, cherished and kept,” R3 II, 2, 119. “who --s the tent now?” Troil. V, 1, 11. “k. then this passage to the Capitol,” Tit. I, 12. “k. the door,” Hml. IV, 5, 115. “Gratiano, k. the house,” Oth. V, 2, 365 etc. With from, == to protect from: “heavens k. him from these beasts,” Tp. II, 1, 324. “to k. me from a most unholy match,” Gent. IV, 3, 30. “--s you from dishonour,” Meas. III, 1, 246. “to k. him from stumbling,” Shr. III, 2, 59. “that --s you from the blow of the law,” Tw. III, 4, 168. “k. his princely heart from Richard's hand,” John I, 267. “that this good blossom could be kept from cankers,” H4B II, 2, 102. “to k. your royal person from treason's knife,” H6B III, 1, 173. “kept low shrubs from winter's powerful wind,” H6C V, 2, 15. “God k. you from them,” R3 III, 1, 15. R3 III, 1, 15 “to k. itself from noyance,” Hml. III, 3, 13 etc.
3) to occupy, to inhabit, to be or remain in: “let him k. his loathsome cabin,” Ven. 637. “which three till now never kept seat in one,” Sonn. 105, 14. “k. your cabins,” Tp. I, 1, 15. “they do no more adhere and k. place together,” Wiv. II, 1, 62. “that Adam that kept the Paradise,” Err. IV, 3, 16. “you will k. the house,” Meas. III, 2, 75 (remain within doors), “who cannot k. his wealth, must k. his house,” Tim. III, 3, 42; “a goodly day not to k. house,” Cymb. III, 3, 1 (see House). “other slow arts entirely k. the brain,” LLL IV, 3, 324. “making that idiot laughter k. men's eyes,” John III, 3, 45. “doth he k. his bed?” H4A IV, 1, 21 (cf. Bed). “like peasant foot-boys do they k. the walls,” H6A III, 2, 69. “the Earl of Pembroke --s his regiment,” R3 V, 3, 29 (remains with). “--s his tent,” Troil. I, 3, 190. “the hart Achilles --s thicket,” II, 3, 270. “k. then the path,” III, 3, 155 (occupy, enter on). “did ever dragon k. so fair a cave,” Rom. III, 2, 74. “--s his chamber,” Tim. III, 4, 73; Cymb. II, 3, 78. “k. the hills,” Caes. V, 1, 3. “our hostess --s her state,” Mcb. III, 4, 5. “thy spirit which --s thee,” Ant. II, 3, 19. “he did k. the deck,” Cymb. I, 3, 10 etc.
4) to hold, to hold up, to maintain: “if I k. not my rank,” As I, 2, 113. “to k. this city,” John II, 455. “hath power to k. you king,” R2 III, 2, 28. “--s the bridge most valiantly,” H5 III, 6, 11. “yet k. the French the field,” IV, 6, 2. “k. the town,” Cor. I, 7, 5. “kept his credit with his purse,” Tim. III, 2, 75. With “up:” John III, 1, 216.
5) to preserve, to retain: “both were kept for heaven and Collatine,” Lucr. 1166. “k. her husband's shape in mind,” Sonn. 9, 8; cf. As III, 2, 99. “k. this remembrance,” Gent. II, 2, 5. “I will k. your counsel,” Wiv. IV, 6, 7; Mids. III, 2, 308 (cf. Counsel). “let it k. one shape,” Meas. II, 1, 3. “lose a thing that none but fools would k.” III, 1, 8 (wish to preserve). “which I did make him swear to k. for ever,” Merch. IV, 2, 14; V, 156. “k. thy friend under thy own life's key,” Alls I, 1, 75. “thou keptst a wife herself, thyself a maid,” Alls V, 3, 330. “I will not k. this form upon my head,” John III, 4, 101. “to k. by policy what Henry got,” H6B I, 1, 84. “k. comfort to you,” H8 V, 1, 145. “k. this sleeve,” Troil. V, 2, 66. “k. this holy kiss,” Rom. IV, 1, 43. “k. his wealth,” Tim. III, 3, 42. “I shall the effect of this good lesson k.” Hml. I, 3, 45. “k. it, my Pericles,” Per. II, 1, 132. Per. II, 1, 132
6) to hold and preserve in any state, to cause to continue or to be: “the staring ruffian shall it k. in quiet,” Ven. 1149. “kept in awe,” Lucr. 245. “let my good name be kept unspotted,” Lucr. 245 “to k. thy sharp woes waking,” Lucr. 245 “k. open my heavy eyelids,” Sonn. 61, 1. “k. invention in a noted weed,” 76, 6. “with tears thou --est me blind,” 148, 13. “he kept his head above the waves,” Tp. II, 1, 118. “to k. them living,” Tp. II, 1, 118 “night kept chained below,” IV, 1, 31. “fire that's closest kept,” Gent. I, 2, 30. “kept alive,” III, 1, 184. “that I'll k. shut,” III, 1, 184 “to k. him above deck,” Wiv. II, 1, 94. “to k. the terms of my honour precise,” II, 2, 22. “k. their limbs whole,” III, 1, 79. “k. the body ever fair,” Meas. III, 1, 188. “to k. him warm,” III, 2, 8. “I will k. her ignorant of her good,” IV, 3, 113. “k. me in patience,” V, 116. “so clean kept,” Err. III, 2, 105. “to k. obliged faith unforfeited,” Merch. II, 6, 7. “k. fresh,” Tw. I, 1, 31. “k. dry,” I, 3, 79. “to k. in darkness,” V, 156. “well summered and warm kept,” H5 V, 2, 335. “opinion shall k. me on the side,” H6A II, 4, 54. “kept him a foreign man still,” H8 II, 2, 129. “we'll k. ourself till supper-time alone,” Mcb. III, 1, 43. “that great bond which --s me pale,” III, 2, 50. “k. you in the rear of your affection,” Hml. I, 3, 34 (Ff k. within). “--s himself in clouds,” IV, 5, 89. “k. yourself within yourself,” Ant. II, 5, 75. “you k. by land the legions and the horse whole,” III, 7, 71 etc.
7) to continue, to pursue: “k. your way,” Wiv. III, 2, 1; Ado I, 1, 143; H8 II, 4, 128. “k. a peaceful progress to the ocean,” John II, 339. “--s the roadway,” H4B II, 2, 62. “--s his course truly,” H5 V, 2, 173; H6C V, 3, 1; V, 4, 22; Ant. V, 2, 80. “k. my wonted calling,” H6A III, 1, 32. “no pulse shall k. his native progress,” Rom. IV, 1, 97. With on: “kept on his course,” R2 V, 2, 10. “k. on your way,” Cor. IV, 2, 10.
8) to tend, to have the care of: “I k. his house,” Wiv. I, 4, 100 (cf. House). “you will k. the house,” Meas. III, 2, 75 (quibbling). “I will forswear --ing house,” H4B II, 4, 220; cf. H5 II, 1, 37; Tim. III, 1, 24. I have kept it (a child) “myself,” Meas. III, 2, 214. shall I k. “your hogs,” As I, 1, 40. “kept sheep,” John IV, 1, 17. “when thou didst k. my lambs,” H6A V, 4, 30.
9) to entertain, to maintain, to have in service or in the house: “she --s thee to this purpose,” Sonn. 126, 7. “kept hearts in liveries,” Compl. 195. “whom now I k. in service,” Tp. I, 2, 286. “if I can recover him and k. him tame,” II, 2, 79. “I will put off my hope and k. it no longer for my flatterer,” III, 3, 7. “I k. but three men,” Wiv. I, 1, 284. “I must k. her at the park,” LLL I, 2, 136. “thou wilt k. my tears for glasses,” IV, 3, 39. “my brother he --s at school,” As I, 1, 6. “he --s me rustically at home,” As I, 1, 6 “schoolmasters will I k.” Shr. I, 1, 94. “you will have Gremio to k. you fair,” II, 17. “whom thou --est command,” II, 17 “--s a good fire,” All's IV, 5, 51. “k. no fool,” Tw. III, 1, 37. “--s a school i 'the church,” III, 2, 81. “to k. you as a prisoner,” Wint. I, 2, 52. “k. ten thousand men,” R2 IV, 283. “k. lodgers,” H5 II, 1, 33. “he --s a Trojan drab,” Troil. V, 1, 104. “k. a dog,” Tim. IV, 3, 200. Tim. IV, 3, 200 “in his house I k. a servant fee'd,” Mcb. III, 4, 132. “k. a farm and carters,” Hml. II, 2, 167. “k. a schoolmaster,” Lr. I, 4, 195. “k. it as a cistern for foul toads,” Oth. IV, 2, 61 etc.
10) to observe, to practise, not to violate: “then can no horse with my desire k. pace,” Sonn. 51, 9; Ado III, 4, 93; Mids. III, 2, 445 (cf. Pace). “his prescriptions are not kept,” Sonn. 147, 6. “vowed chaste life to k.” 154, 3. “kept cold distance,” Compl. 237. “k. tune,” Gent. I, 2, 89. “I will k. the haviour of reputation,” Wiv. I, 3, 86. “unless they kept very good diet,” Meas. II, 1, 116; R3 I, 1, 139. “k. your instruction,” Meas. IV, 5, 3. “so he would k. fair quarter with his bed,” Err. II, 1, 108. “k. then fair league and truce with thy true bed,” II, 2, 147. “when I k. not hours,” III, 1, 2. “to k. those statutes,” LLL I, 1, 17. “barren tasks, too hard to k.” LLL I, 1, 17 “k. some state in thy exit,” V, 2, 598. “k. his day,” Merch. II, 8, 25. “k. no measure,” R2 III, 4, 7. “k. law and form,” R2 III, 4, 7 “he --s no mean,” H6A I, 2, 121. “you will not k. your hour,” H6B II, 1, 181. “k. your duties,” Cor. I, 7, 1. “k. decorum,” Ant. I, 2, 77. V, 2, 17. “k. the turn of tippling,” I, 4, 19. “which to the tune of flutes kept stroke,” II, 2, 200. “to k. an oath:” LLL I, 1, 23. II, 105. V, 2, 442. Merch. II, 7, 99. Tw. III, 4, 341 etc. (cf. Oath). “to k. peace:” Ado II, 3, 202. H6A III, 1, 87 etc. (cf. Peace). “to k. promise:” Mids. I, 1, 179. Tw. V, 106 etc. (cf. Promise). “--ing what is sworn,” LLL IV, 3, 356. “to k. time:” Lucr. 1127. Wiv. I, 3, 29. As V, 3, 38. Tw. II, 3, 100. R2 V, 5, 42 etc. (cf. Time). “to k. word:” Mids. I, 1, 222. III, 2, 266. H4A I, 2, 134. H6B III, 2, 293 etc. (cf. Word). “he knows the game: how true he --s the wind,” H6C III, 2, 14 (cf. Wind). “mine honour --s the weather of my fate,” Troil. V, 3, 26 (cf. Weather).
11) to hold or restrain in any manner, to detain: “'tis a foul thing when a cur cannot k. himself in all companies,” Gent. IV, 4, 11 (Launce's speech). “we'll k. him here,” R2 V, 2, 100; H6A IV, 7, 89; Ant. I, 3, 22. “to k. his tongue,” Shr. I, 1, 214. “kept him in captivity,” H6B II, 2, 42. “thou --est the stroke betwixt thy begging and my meditation,” R3 IV, 2, 117. “I will take order for her --ing close,” R3 IV, 2, 117 Followed by from (== to withhold, or to prevent from): “that rich jewel he should k. unknown from thievish ears,” Lucr. 34. “a thousand crosses k. them from thy aid,” Lucr. 34 “k. him from heart-easing words,” Lucr. 34 “you k. from me the rest o the island,” Tp. I, 2, 343. “kept severely from resort of men,” Gent. III, 1, 108. “to k. them from uncivil outrages,” V, 4, 17. “k. a gamester from the dice,” Wiv. III, 1, 37. “k. it from my head,” H4B IV, 5, 175. “k. it from civil broils,” H6A I, 1, 53. “--s his men from mutiny,” H6A I, 1, 53 “--ing my house from me,” H6B I, 3, 20. “the means that --s me from it,” H6C III, 2, 141. “hath kept my eyes from rest,” R3 IV, 1, 82 (Ff held). “k. it not from me,” Mcb. IV, 3, 200. “k. her from her rest,” V, 3, 39. “I have kept me from the cup,” Ant. II, 7, 72. “the seven-fold shield of Ajax cannot k. the battery from my heart,” IV, 14, 38. By out of: “God k. him out of my sight,” Ado II, 1, 113. Joined with asunder: “k. them asunder,” Wiv. III, 1, 73. “kept asunder,” H6B I, 4, 55. With away: “that kept my rest away,” Pilgr. 182. “k. away the succours,” H6A IV, 4, 22. With back: “some k. back the clamorous owl,” Mids. II, 2, 5. “k. not back your powers,” H6A V, 2, 5. H6C IV, 7, 56. With down: “to k. down his heart,” LLL IV, 3, 136. With in: “k. in your weapon,” Wiv. III, 1, 75. “let her be secretly kept in,” Ado IV, 1, 205. “k. it in,” Tw. I, 5, 209 (do not recite it). “what I am willing to k. in,” II, 1, 14 (to hold secret). “could not all this flesh k. in a little life,” H4A V, 4, 103. “with thy lips k. in my soul awhile,” H6C V, 2, 35. “the flood kept in my soul,” R3 I, 4, 38 (Ff stopped). With off: which (displeasure) “I'll k. off,” All's V, 3, 236. “to k. the horsemen off from breaking in,” H6A I, 1, 119. “armour to k. off that word,” Rom. III, 3, 54. With out: “--est me out from the house,” Err. III, 1, 42. “k. him out,” All's I, 1, 125. he will k. out water a great while, Hml. V. 1, 187. With together: “kept together and put to use,” Tw. III, 1, 56. With under: “the wars have so kept you under,” All's I, 1, 209. With up: “k. up your swords,” Oth. I, 2, 59 (do not draw them). “k. up thy quillets,” III, 1, 25 (abstain from them).
12) to celebrate, to institute, to perform, to hold: “love --s his revels,” Ven. 123; Mids. II, 1, 18. “k. the obsequy so strict,” Phoen. 12. “we will our celebration k.” Tw. IV, 3, 30. “this day shall be kept festival,” John III, 1, 76. “shall our feast be kept with slaughtered men,” John III, 1, 76 “grief hath kept a tedious fast,” R2 II, 1, 75. “death --s his court,” III, 2, 162. “to k. our great Saint George's feast,” H6A I, 1, 154. “a holiday shall this be kept,” R3 II, 1, 73. “there are two councils kept,” III, 2, 12 (Qq held). “a brief span to k. your earthly audit,” H8 III, 2, 141. “as if we kept a fair here,” V, 4, 73. “to k. his state in Rome,” Caes. I, 2, 160. “k. leets and lawdays,” Oth. III, 3, 140. “Neptune's feast to k.” Per. V Prol. Per. V Prol.
13) to perform, to do, to make: “to k. company,” Wiv. III, 2, 73; Err. V, 398; Mids. III, 1, 147; As I, 2, 287; Tw. V, 99: H4A II, 4, 457 etc. (cf. Company). “--s all this noise,” Err. III, 1, 61. “what a caterwauling do you k. here?” Tw. II, 3, 76; Tit. IV, 2, 57. “what stir --s good old York there?” R2 II, 3, 52. “what a brawling dost thou keep,” H4A II, 2, 6. “when thou --est not racket,” H4B II, 2, 23. “we'll k. no great ado,” Rom. III, 4, 23. “--s wassail,” Hml. I, 4, 9. “k. this dreadful pother,” Lr. III, 2, 50. “I would have kept such a jangling,” Per. II, 1, 45. “--s her guard in honestest defence,” All's III, 5, 76. “what watch the king --s to maintain the peace,” H5 IV, 1, 300. “care --s his watch,” Rom. II, 3, 35. “kept the watch,” Hml. I, 2, 208.
14) to hold, to have: “if of life you k. a care,” Tp. II, 1, 303. “k. a good tongue in your head,” III, 2, 39. III, 2, 39 “k. good quarter and good care to-night,” John V, 5, 20. “two stars k. not their motion in one sphere,” H4A V, 4, 65. “the seal I k.” R3 II, 4, 71. --s place with “thought,” Troil. III, 3, 199. “upon the right hand I, k. thou the left,” Caes. V, 1, 18. “k. eyes upon her,” Mcb. V, 1, 85. “--s them in the corner of his jaw,” Hml. IV, 2, 19. “to k. one's eyes of either side's nose,” Lr. I, 5, 22. Apparently quite == to hold, to manage: “kept his sword e'en like a dancer,” Ant. III, 11, 35 (but perhaps == kept his sword sheathed, which is expresssed by to keep up in Oth. I, 2, 59).
II. intr. 1) to remain, to abide: “k. below,” Tp. I, 1, 12. “the image that hath kept with thy remembrance,” I, 2, 44. “k. in that mind,” Wiv. III, 3, 89. “to k. unwed,” Err. II, 1, 26. “you would k. from my heels,” III, 1, 18. “it --s on the windy side of care,” Ado II, 1, 327. “shall I always k. below stairs,” V, 2, 10. “k. not too long in one tune,” LLL III, 21. “still you k. o'the windy side of the law,” Tw. III, 4, 181. “kept loyal to possession,” H4A III, 2, 43. “k. aloof from strict arbitrement,” IV, 1, 70. “could not k. quiet in his conscience,” H5 I, 2, 79. “k. in one consent,” H5 I, 2, 79 “k. off aloof,” H6A IV, 4, 21. “k. in favour with the king,” R3 I, 1, 79. “I'll k. at home,” Cor. V, 1, 7. “why do you k. alone,” Mcb. III, 2, 8; Per. IV, 1, 22. “k. within the rear of your affection,” Hml. I, 3, 34 (Qq k. you in). “--s in the wonted pace,” II, 2, 353. “--s aloof,” III, 1, 8. “the rest shall k. as they are,” III, 1, 8 “k. in-a-door,” Lr. I, 4, 138. “k. a week away,” Oth. III, 4, 173. “k. off them,” Ant. II, 7, 66. “we k. whole by land,” III, 7, 75. III, 8, 3. “her --ing close,” Cymb. III, 5, 46. “by his fall my honour must k. high,” Per. I, 1, 149.
2) to dwell, to live, to stay: “where earthdelving conies k.” Ven. 687. “k. in Tunis,” Tp. II, 1, 259. “assemblies, where youth and cost and witless bravery --s,” Meas. I, 3, 10. “this habitation where thou --est,” III, 1, 10. “outward courtesies would fain proclaim favours that k. within,” V, 16. “a Spaniard that --s here in court,” LLL IV, 1, 100. “the creatures of prey that k. upon't,” Wint. III, 3, 13. “'twas where the madcap duke his uncle kept,” H4A I, 3, 244. “as an outlaw in a castle --s,” H6A III, 1, 47. “he --s in the cold field,” H6C IV, 3, 14. “I will k. where there is wit stirring,” Troil. II, 1, 129. “in what place of the field doth Calchas k.?” IV, 5, 278. “knock at his study, where, they say, he --s,” Tit. V, 2, 5. “the confident tyrant --s still in Dunsinane,” Mcb. V, 4, 9. “where they k.” Hml. II, 1, 8. “it kept where I kept,” Per. II, 1, 136.
3) Followed by with, == to live, to converse with: “k. with thy hounds,” Ven. 678. “these banished men that I have kept withal,” Gent. V, 4, 152. “the most impenetrable cur that ever kept with men,” Merch. III, 3, 19. “k. with Bohemia,” Wint. I, 2, 344. “him k. with,” H4A II, 4, 473. “let pale-faced fear k. with the mean-born man,” H6B III, 1, 335. “noble minds k. ever with their likes,” Caes. I, 2, 315. “to k. with you at meals,” II, 1, 284. “I will k. still with my philosopher,” Lr. III, 4, 181. In the same sense with together: “treason and murder ever kept together,” H5 II, 2, 105. “we kept together in our chivalry,” IV, 6, 19.
4) With on, == to continue one's way, to proceed: “pray you, k. on,” Wiv. I, 1, 321 (enter the house); cf. Tim. II, 2, 34. “--s due on to the Propontic,” Oth. III, 3, 455.
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