previous next
Kiss, vb. 1) to touch with the lips in love or respect; absol.: Ven. 47. As IV, 1, 75. Shr. V, 1, 151. All's IV, 3, 257. Wint. IV, 4, 163. Rom. I, 5, 112. Hml. II, 2, 182 (a good --ing carrion, i. e. a carrion good in point of kissing, worth kissing; cf. “too hard a keeping oath,” LLL I, 1, 65). Oth. II, 1, 176. III, 3, 425. Ant. IV, 15, 39. Per. I, 2, 79 etc. With an accus.: Ven. 59. Ven. 59 Tp. II, 2, 153. Gent. I, 2, 108. II, 3, 28. III, 1, 326. IV, 4, 204. Wiv. I, 1, 116. Ado IV, 1, 336. V, 2, 51. Mids. IV, 1, 4. Merch. II, 7, 40. As Epil. Merch. II, 7, 40 Shr. II, 326. IV, 1, 155. V, 1, 148. V, 2, 25. 180 etc. “k. the book,” Tp. II, 2, 135. Tp. II, 2, 135 “they kneel, they k. the earth,” Wint. V, 1, 199 (in sign of submission and repentance); cf. “to k. the ground before young Malcolm's feet,” Mcb. V, 8, 28. k. the rod (== to submit tamely to punishment) Gent. I, 2, 59. R2 V, 1, 32. Kissing one's own hand in token of respect to another: LLL IV, 1, 148. V, 2, 324. As III, 2, 50. Shr. IV, 1, 97. All's II, 2, 10. Tw. III, 4, 36. H6A V, 3, 48. H6B IV, 1, 53. Oth. II, 1, 174. An accus. denoting the effect: “--ed his hand away,” LLL V, 2, 324. “--ed away kingdoms,” Ant. III, 10, 7. “k. the honoured gashes whole,” IV, 8, 10. Reciprocally: “long may they k. each other,” Ven. 505; R3 IV, 3, 13 (of the two lips of the same mouth). “let them k. one another,” H6B IV, 7, 138 (Cade's speech). Metaphorically: “--ing with golden face the meadows green,” Sonn. 33, 3. “the stairs, as he treads on them, k. his feet,” LLL V, 2, 330. “some there be that shadows k.” Merch. II, 9, 66. “when the sweet wind did gently k. the trees,” V, 2. “Fortune shall k. him with a glorious victory,” John II, 394. “k. the lips of unacquainted change,” III, 4, 166. “didst thou never see Titan k. a dish of butter,” H4A II, 4, 133. “the hearts of princes k. obedience, so much they love it,” H8 III, 1, 162. “these happy masks that k. fair ladies' brows,” Rom. I, 1, 236. “winds of all the corners --ed your sails,” Cymb. II, 4, 28.
2) to touch, to meet: “heaven to k. the turrets bowed,” Lucr. 1372. “beat the ground for --ing of their feet,” Tp. IV, 174. “by this virgin palm now --ing thine,” LLL V, 2, 816. “to k. her burial,” Merch. I, 1, 29. “when with his knees he --ed the Cretan strond,” Shr. I, 1, 175. “the stars will k. the valleys first,” Wint. V, 1, 206. “let heaven k. earth,” H4B I, 1, 153. “rub on, and k. the mistress,” Troil. III, 2, 52 (quibbling; cf. Cymb. II, 1, 2). “yond towers must k. their own feet,” IV, 5, 221. “till the lowest stream do k. the most exalted shores of all,” Caes. I, 1, 65. “darkness does the face of earth entomb, when living light should k. it,” Mcb. II, 4, 10. “when I --ed the jack,” Cymb. II, 1, 2*(cf. “Jack” Cymb. II, 1, 2). “the towers --ed the clouds,” Per. I, 4, 24.
3) to salute or caress each other by joining lips: “courtsied when you have and --ed,” Tp. I, 2, 378. “now k., embrace,” Gent. I, 2, 129. Wiv. III, 5, 75. Mids. III, 2, 140. Shr. IV, 2, 27. All's II, 5, 91. H6B III, 2, 354. IV, 7, 145. H6C II, 1, 29. Troil. IV, 4, 100. Tit. III, 1, 288.
4) to touch each other, to meet, to join (intr.): “the mightiest space in fortune nature brings to join like likes and k. like native things,” All's I, 1, 238. “I and greatness were compelled to k.” H4B III, 1, 74. “like fire and powder, which as they k. consume,” Rom. II, 6, 11. “solderest close impossibilities and makest them k.” Tim. IV, 3, 389. “here they might take two thieves --ing,” Ant. II, 6, 101.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: