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Live, vb. 1) to be alive, not to be dead: “give thanks that you have --d so long,” Tp. I, 1, 27. “he may l.” II, 1, 113. “to keep them --ing,” II, 1, 299. II, 2, 116. III, 3, 21. V, 108. V, 108 V, 108 Gent. III, 1, 23. IV, 4, 17. IV, 4, 17 Wiv. I, 1, 186. Meas. I, 2, 40. II, 2, 99. II, 2, 99 Err. I, 1, 140. Ado II, 1, 257. Mids. III, 1, 34. As I, 1, 161 etc. etc. “made her thrall to --ing death,” Lucr. 726 (to death in life, to a life resembling death). “steal dead seeing of his --ing hue,” Sonn. 67, 6 (the hue which he has in life). “why not death rather than --ing torment,” Gent. III, 1, 170 (torment in life, a tormented life). “thy last --ing leave,” R2 V, 1, 39 (the last leave in thy life). “I drave my suitor from his mad humour of love to a --ing humour of madness,” As III, 2, 439 (a humour of madness concerning his life, his manner of living). “give me a --ing reason she's disloyal,” Oth. III, 3, 409 (a reason taken from life). “now they kill me with a --ing death,” R3 I, 2, 153. “no other speaker of my --ing actions,” H8 IV, 2, 70 (the actions of my life). long l., used as a salutation, to express devotedness and attachment: “long l. Gonzalo!” Tp. II, 1, 169. “long l. Henry,” R2 IV, 112. H6B I, 1, 37. II, 2, 63. H6C I, 1, 202. IV, 7, 76. Tit. I, 169. Tit. I, 169 Caes. V, 1, 32. Hml. I, 1, 3. Cymb. III, 7, 10. Converted to a curse: “l. loathed and long,” Tim. III, 6, 103. l., without long, in the same sense: “l. and flourish,” R3 V, 3, 130 “l. and beget a happy race of kings,” R3 V, 3, 130 “l., Brutus, l.” Caes. III, 2, 53. “l., noble Helicane!” Per. II, 4, 40. With an accus.: “to l. a second life,” Sonn. 68, 7. “l. an upright life,” Merch. III, 5, 79. And even: “he that shall see this day, and l. old age,” H5 IV, 3, 44 (M. Edd. he that shall l. this day and see old age). Not to mention such phrases as “l. a thousand years,” Rom. I, 3, 46; “l. the lease of nature,” Mcb. IV, 1, 99, which need no explanation. Followed by an inf., == a) to experience, to see the day, to have the good or ill fortune: “have I --d to be carried in a basket,” Wiv. III, 5, 4. “have I --d to stand to the taunt of one,” V, 5, 150. “I have --d to see inherited my very wishes,” Cor. II, 1, 214. “hath Cassius --d to be but mirth and laughter to his Brutus,” Caes. IV, 3, 113. “if you l. to see this come to pass,” Meas. II, 1, 256. “if thou l. to see like right bereft,” Err. II, 1, 40. “if I l. to be as old as Sibylla,” Merch. I, 2, 116. Wint. V, 2, 157. R2 IV, 218. H6B I, 3, 85. Oth. III, 3, 376 etc. “shall I l. on to see this bastard kneel,” Wint. II, 3, 155. “if we l. thus tamely to be thus jaded by a piece of scarlet,” H8 III, 2, 279. b) to get occasion by escaping death: “thou shalt not l. to brag what we have offered,” Gent. IV, 1, 69. “if I may l. to report you,” Meas. III, 2, 172. let me in my present wildness die “and never l. to show the incredulous world the noble change,” H4B IV, 5, 154. V, 2, 105. V, 2, 105 H5 IV, 1, 233. H6B I, 3, 115. II, 2, 81. II, 4, 83. <*>, 1, 81. R3 I, 1, 127 etc. c) merely periphrastic: “let me not l. to look upon your grace,” Gent. III, 2, 21 (== let me not look). “'tis pity that thou --st to walk where honest men resort,” Err. V, 27. “I will l. to be thankful to thee,” Tw. IV, 2, 89. “I will not l. to be accounted Warwick,” H6A II, 4, 120. “ne'er may he l. to see a sunshine day,” H6C II, 1, 187. “we l. not to be griped by meaner persons,” H8 II, 2, 136. which (benefits) “l. to come in my behalf,” Troil. III, 3, 16. “Caesar cannot l. to be ungentle,” Ant. V, 1, 59 (O. Edd. leave).
2) to exist, to have being: “the sourest-natured dog that --s,” Gent. II, 3, 6. “the duke is marvellous little beholding to your reports, but the best is, he --s not in them,” Meas. IV, 3, 167 (in that character, in which you represent him, he has no existence). “who --d king, but I could dig his grave?” H6C V, 2, 21 (what king existed). “he --s that loves thee better,” R3 I, 2, 141. Very freely used of things (so that Walker, in his Critical Examination II, p. 209, was often tempted to change it to lie): “there --s more life in one of your fair eyes,” Sonn. 83, 13. “if shame l. in a disguise of love,” Gent. V, 4, 106. “mortality and mercy l. in thy tongue and heart,” Meas. I, 1, 46. “no glory --s behind the back of such,” Ado III, 1, 110. “the practice of it --s in John the bastard,” IV, 1, 190. “thine eyes, where all those pleasures l.” LLL IV, 2, 114. “in those freckles l. their savours,” Mids. II, 1, 13. “all affections else that l. in her,” Tw. I, 1, 37. “scarce any joy did ever so long l.” Wint. V, 3, 52. “the image of a wicked heinous fault --s in his eye,” John IV, 2, 72. “where no venom else but only they have privilege to l.” R2 II, 1, 158. “where nothing --s but crosses, cares and grief,” II, 2, 79. “my honour --s when his dishonour dies,” V, 3, 70. “to make misfortune l.” V, 5, 71. “in the reproof of this --s the jest,” H4A I, 2, 213 (reading of Q1; rest of Edd. lies). “a comfort of retirement --s in this,” IV, 1, 56. “all his offences l. upon my head and on his father's,” V, 2, 20. “our supplies l. large in the hope of great Northumberland,” H4B I, 3, 12. “his trespass yet --s guilty in thy blood,” H6A II, 4, 94. “peace --s again,” R3 V, 5, 40. “justice --s in Saturninus' health,” Tit. IV, 4, 23. “more courtship --s in carrion flies,” Rom. III, 3, 34. “confusion's cure --s not in these confusions,” IV, 5, 65. “artificial strife --s in these touches,” Tim. I, 1, 38. “if it l. in your memory,” Hml. II, 2, 470. “there --s within the very flame of love a kind of wick,” IV, 7, 115. “freedom --s hence,” Lr. I, 1, 184. “when slanders do not l. in tongues,” III, 2, 87. “the tears l. in an onion that should water this sorrow,” Ant. I, 2, 176.
3) to remain in life, not to die: “let her brother l.” Meas. II, 2, 175. “your brother cannot l.” II, 4, 33. II, 4, 33 “I've hope to l.” III, 1, 4. III, 1, 4 “he had --d,” IV, 3, 165. “would yet he had --d,” IV, 4, 35. Err. I, 1, 155. Merch. III, 2, 35. Merch. III, 2, 35 Tw. II, 5, 69. Wint. II, 2, 27. H5 IV, I, 220. Tit. III, 1, 297. IV, 1, 112. IV, 4, 21. Caes. IV, 3, 265. Ant. IV, 2, 5 etc.
4) to continue to exist, to last, to remain, to hold out: “flowers distilled, though they with winter meet, leese but their show; their substance still --s sweet,” Sonn. 5, 14. “how is it that this --s in thy mind?” Tp. II, 1, 49. “to have his title l. in Aquitaine,” LLL II, 146. “it --s there unchecked that Antonio hath a ship wrecked,” Merch. III, 1, 2. “my fair name, despite of death that --s upon my grave,” R2 I, 1, 168. “the truth should l. from age to age,” R3 III, 1, 76. “fame --s long,” R3 III, 1, 76 “to make his valour l.” R3 III, 1, 76 R3 III, 1, 76 “men's evil manners l. in brass,” H8 IV, 2, 45. “the evil that men do --s after them,” Caes. III, 2, 80. --ing == everlasting: “still and contemplative in --ing art,” LLL I, 1, 14. “this grave shall have a --ing monument,” Hml. V, 1, 320.
In the language of mariners, == not to sink, to float, to drive: “a strong mast that --d upon the sea,” Tw. I, 2, 14.
5) to pass life or time in a particular manner: “that for which I l.” Tp. IV, 1, 4. “merrily shall I l. now,” V, 93. “--ing dully sluggardized at home,” Gent. I, 1, 7. I, 3, 56. IV, 1, 63. Wiv. I, 1, 286. Meas. II, 4, 184. Err. II, 2, 148. Ado I, 1, 248. II, 1, 51. II, 1, 51 V, 4, 112. Mids. I, 1, 72. Merch. III, 2, 25. III, 4, 28. All's I, 3, 223. Tw. I, 4, 39. IV, 3, 28. V, 127. H6A I, 2, 13. II, 2, 31. H6C I, 3, 43. R3 III, 1, 93 etc. Of things: “ere the crown he looks for l. in peace,” R2 III, 3, 95. it (the crown) “may with thee in true peace live,” H4B IV, 5, 220. Followed by with, == to be united, to have intercourse: “beauty --s with kindness,” Gent. IV, 2, 45. “will l. with you,” IV, 1, 70. “to l. with me my fellow-scholars,” LLL I, 1, 16. All's III, 4, 14. H6B III, 2, 153. R3 IV, 1, 43. Oth. I, 3, 249 etc.
6) to be full of life and animation: “by looking on thee in the --ing day,” Sonn. 43, 10; cf. “when --ing light should kiss it,” Mcb. II, 4, 10. “hath love in thy old blood no --ing fire?” R2 I, 2, 10. “no friend will rid me of this --ing fear,” V, 4, 2. “thy voluntary oath --s in this bosom, dearly cherished,” John III, 3, 24. “to undertake the death of all the world, so I might l. one hour in your sweet bosom,” R3 I, 2, 124 (lie? Qq rest). cf. “I will l. in thy heart,” Ado V, 2, 104. Hence == to thrive: “let me see thee froth and l.” Wiv. I, 3, 15 (the spurious Qq and M. Edd. lime). “l. and thrive,” Cor. IV, 6, 23. “you are light into my hands, where you are like to l.” Per. IV, 2, 78. cf. “well to l.” Merch. II, 2, 55 and Wint. III, 3, 125. “an you will have me l., play Heart's ease,” Rom. IV, 5, 103. And == to be valid, to be full of truth: “an old instance, that --d in the time of good neighbours,” Ado V, 2, 79. “so in approof --s not his epitaph as in your royal speech,” All's I, 2, 50. “I'll make my match to l.” Troil. IV, 5, 37.
7) to subsist, to be supported, to feed: “means to l.” Tp. II, 1, 50. “a poor fellow that would l.” Meas. II, 1, 235. III, 2, 22. III, 2, 22 H4A II, 2, 96 etc. With by: “the means whereby I l.” Merch. IV, 1, 377. “as I do l. by food,” As II, 7, 14. “dies and --s by bloody drops,” III, 5, 7. “I can l. no longer by thinking,” V, 2, 55. “dost thou l. by thy tabor?” Tw. III, 1, 2. “l. by gazing,” Wint. IV, 4, 110. “l. honestly by the prick of their needles,” H5 II, 1, 36. “I'll l. by Nym, and Nym shall l. by me,” H5 II, 1, 36 “that competency whereby they l.” Cor. I, 1, 144. “all that I l. by,” Caes. I, 1, 24. With on: “--s upon his gains,” Sonn. 67, 12. “l. on thy confusion,” Err. II, 2, 182. “--d on the alms-basket of words,” LLL V, 1, 41. “a scattered smile, and that I'll l. upon,” As III, 5, 104. “the food which you do l. upon,” Cor. I, 1, 136. “that l. and feed upon your majesty,” Hml. III, 3, 10. “l. upon the vapour of a dungeon,” Oth. III, 3, 271. With with: “I l. with bread,” R2 III, 2, 175. “l. with cheese and garlic,” H4A III, 1, 161. “I l. with the awl,” Caes. I, 1, 24.
8) to abide, to dwell: “you 'mongst men being most unfit to l.” Tp. III, 3, 58. “where l. nibbling sheep,” IV, 62. “let me l. here ever,” IV, 62 “I l. by the church,” Tw. III, 1, 3. Tw. III, 1, 3 Gent. II, 4, 28. Err. V, 7. LLL I, 1, 35. As I, 1, 119. II, 3, 72. R2 V, 5, 2. Tit. IV, 2, 152. Mcb. III, 6, 26. Per. V, 1, 114 etc.
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