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Lord, subst. 1) master, ruler, owner: “dear l. of that dear jewel I have lost,” Lucr. 1191. “l. of my love,” Sonn. 26, 1. “they are the --s and owners of their faces,” 94, 7. the l. on't (the island) Tp. I, 2, 456. “Prospero my l. shall know,” II, 1, 326. “thou shalt be l. of it,” III, 2, 65. V, 162. “Love's a mighty l.” Gent. II, 4, 136. “that they should harbour where their l. would be,” III, 1, 149. “--s of the wide world,” Err. II, 1, 21. “whom I made l. of me and all,” V, 137. l. of folded arms (Cupid) LLL III, 183. “I thought you l. of more true gentleness,” Mids. II, 2, 132. “my fairy l., this must be done,” III, 2, 378. “l. Love,” Merch. II, 9, 101. “thou shalt live as freely as thy l.” Tw. I, 4, 39. I, 5, 249. “our sovereign l. the king,” Wint. III, 2, 17. “l. of thy presence,” John I, 137. “l. of our presence,” II, 367. “gain, be my l.” II, 367 “were I but now the l. of such hot youth,” R2 II, 3, 99. “l. of such a spirit,” H4A V, 4, 18. “join in friendship, as your --s have done,” H6A III, 1, 145. “disdain to call us l.” H6B IV, 1, 88. “now is Mortimer l. of this city,” IV, 6, 1. “strength should be the l. of imbecility,” Troil. I, 3, 114. “no man is the l. of any thing,” III, 3, 115. “those chances which he was l. of,” Cor. IV, 7, 41. “my bosom's l. sits lightly in his throne,” Rom. V, 1, 3. “the rabble call him l.” Hml. IV, 5, 102. “you are the l. of duty,” Oth. I, 3, 184. “l. of his fortunes he salutes thee,” Ant. III, 12, 11. “would make his will l. of his reason,” III, 13, 4. “he that strikes the venison first shall be the l. o'the feast,” Cymb. III, 3, 75 (cf. “master of the feast,” III, 6, 29) etc. etc. “l. and master:” All's II, 3, 194. All's II, 3, 194 All's II, 3, 194 Tw. I, 5, 271. “l. of --s,” Ant. IV, 8, 16. stand my good l. == be my patron, H4B IV, 3, 89; “standing your friendly l.” Cor. II, 3, 198. Applied to women: “when they strive to be --s of their --s,” LLL IV, 1, 38; but now I was the l. of “this fair mansion,” Merch. III, 2, 169. --s o' the field == conquerors: Cor. I, 6, 47; cf. “if the French be --s of this loud day,” John V, 4, 14.
2) God: “I praise the L. for you,” LLL IV, 2, 75. “L. worshipped might he be,” Merch. II, 2, 98. “now L. be thanked,” Shr. Ind. 2, 99. “the deputy elected by the L.” R2 III, 2, 57. “the L. increase this business,” H8 III, 2, 161 etc. etc. “the L. of hosts,” H6A I, 1, 31. “by the L.!” Wiv. III, 3, 65. III, 5, 90. Tw. V, 299 etc. (Ff om. in H4A I, 2, 164. II, 3, 17. II, 4, 14. 160). “good L.!” Tp. II, 1, 80. Ado II, 1, 330. Shr. IV, 5, 2. H6A IV, 1, 111 etc. “goodly L.” Merch. III, 5, 55. “L., how mine eyes throw gazes to the east,” Pilgr. 193. Tp. I, 2, 410. Ado II, 1, 31. Mids. II, 2, 109 etc. “L., L., your worship's a wanton,” Wiv. II, 2, 56. Gent. I, 2, 15. LLL IV, 1, 143 etc. “O the L.” H4B V, 4, 13 (Mrs Quickly's speech). “O L., L.” As III, 2, 194. “O L.” Err. III, 1, 50. Tw. III, 4, 119. H6A I, 4, 70 etc. “O. L., sir,” LLL I, 2, 6. V, 2, 497; ridiculed as an unmeaning phrase then in fashion: All's II, 2, 43 sq. “write 'L. have mercy on us' on those three,” LLL V, 2, 419 (the inscription placed upon the doors of houses infected with the plague). “are now 'for the --'s sake',” Meas. IV, 3, 21 (the supplication of imprisoned debtors to the passers-by).
3) husband: save of their l. no bearing yoke they (her breasts) “knew,” Lucr. 409. “thou worthy l. of that unworthy wife,” Lucr. 409 “like widowed wombs after their --s' decease,” Sonn. 97, 8. Ado III, 1, 38. III, 4, 31. Mids. II, 1, 63. IV, 1, 104. Merch. III, 4, 4. As V, 4, 140. R2 III, 4, 85. R3 I, 2, 241. I, 3, 7. IV, 4, 338. Rom. III, 2, 66. III, 3, 82. Hml. III, 4, 98. Lr. I, 1, 103. Cymb. I, 5, 78 etc. “my l. and husband,” Shr. Ind. 2, 108. V, 2, 131. Ant. III, 4, 16.
4) a nobleman, a peer, a prince: “this false l.” Lucr. 50. “this lustful l.” Lucr. 50 “all his --s,” Tp. I, 2, 437. “--s that can prate as amply,” II, 1, 263. “this l. of weak remembrance,” II, 1, 263 “my brace of --s,” V, 126. “knights and --s,” Wiv. II, 2, 65. “I'll speak it before the best l.” Wiv. III, 3, 53. Ado I, 1, 55. LLL II, 52. Wint. II, 3, 113. H6B I, 1, 224. Tim. I, 1, 234. 241 etc. etc. “the L. Northumberland,” R2 II, 2, 53. III, 3, 7. “the L. Aumerle,” IV, 6. “the L. Scroop,” H4A I, 3, 271. Merch. III, 5, 77. Merch. III, 5, 77 H6A III, 4, 13. H6B IV, 2, 169. IV, 7, 23. H6C III, 3, 102. IV, 1, 48. IV, 1, 48 R3 III, 2, 3. Tim. III, 2, 13. Hml. I, 3, 89. the --s of York etc. R2 II, 3, 55. “L. Angelo,” Meas. I, 1, 25. Merch. III, 4, 39. H5 IV, 8, 99 etc. “--s appealants,” R2 IV, 104 (cf. Lr. III, 7, 18). “l. governor” R2 II, 1, 220. “l. marquess,” H6B I, 1, 63. “l. consul,” Cor. III, 1, 6. “l. governor,” Per. I, 4, 85. “still so constant, l.” Tw. V, 114. “I can speak English, l.” H4A III, 1, 121. H4A III, 1, 121 IV, 1, 9. “old l., I cannot blame thee,” Tp. III, 3, 4. Tp. III, 3, 4 “it is my l. the duke,” Gent. V, 4, 122. “my l. hath sent you this note,” Meas. IV, 2, 105. Merch. III, 4, 7. All's I, 1, 201. I, 3, 168. IV, 4, 13. IV, 5, 99. Mcb. III, 4, 53 etc. “my young l.” All's III, 2, 3. H4B I, 1, 52. “my l., it shall be done,” Tp. I, 2, 318. II, 1, 22. III, 2, 35. III, 3, 51. Ado IV, 1, 63. Tw. V, 104. H4A II, 3, 10. H4B IV, 3, 87 etc. “my l. Sebastian,” Tp. II, 1, 136. Merch. I, 1, 69. “my l. general,” Cor. I, 9, 81. “I thank my noble l.” Tp. III, 2, 43. “my loving --s,” LLL II, 37. “good morrow, my good --s,” Merch. I, 1, 65. R2 II, 3, 37. H4A I, 2, 179. “my holy l. of Milan,” John V, 2, 120. “good my l.” Tp. II, 1, 186. IV, 204. Gent. II, 7, 50. Meas. I, 1, 48. H4B III, 2, 188 etc. (cf. Good).
5) the principal actor in a play: it is not the fashion to see the lady the epilogue; but it is no more unhandsome than to see the l. the prologue, As Epil. H4B III, 2, 188
“A fair l. calf,” LLL V, 2, 248, == a male calf?
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