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Lose (impf. and partic. lost) 1) to keep no longer, to discontinue to have in consequence of want of care; opposed to find: “to l. our bottles,” Tp. IV, 208. “a lost mutton,” Gent. I, 1, 101. “a schoolboy that had lost his A B C,” II, 1, 23. which (ring) “when you l.” Merch. III, 2, 174. IV, 1, 443. H4A III, 3, 115. Oth. III, 3, 321. III, 4, 60. III, 4, 60 Cymb. II, 4, 124 etc. etc.
2) to cease to have, in whatever manner; opposed to gain or win; absol.: “and lack not to l. still,” All's I, 3, 210. “where she is sure to l.” All's I, 3, 210 “I break, and you l.” H4B V, 5, 129. “we l., they daily get,” H6A IV, 3, 32 etc. trans.: “having no fair to l.” Ven. 1083. “my son is lost,” Tp. II, 1, 109. Tp. II, 1, 109 V, 137. V, 137 “to l. your hair,” IV, 237. “--ing his verdure,” Gent. I, 1, 49. “if the tied were lost,” II, 3, 41. “l. thy master,” II, 3, 41 “thy service,” II, 3, 41 “thy tongue,” II, 3, 41 “doth l. his form,” III, 2, 8. “I have little wealth to l.” IV, 1, 11. “shall I l. my doctor?” Wiv. III, 1, 104. “this deceit --s the name of craft,” V, 5, 239. if I do l. thee (life) Meas. III, 1, 7. H6B IV, 7, 71. H6C III, 2, 7. “to l. his head,” Meas. V, 71; 493; R3 III, 4, 40. Err. II, 1, 110. IV, 3, 97. LLL I, 1, 147 (so won, so lost). Mids. III, 2, 27. Merch. I, 1, 140. III, 2, 304. Tw. II, 4, 35. III, 4, 116. V, 66. Wint. III, 2, 96 (to give lost == to have no more hope, to despair of). H6C I, 1, 140. H8 I, 1, 41. Hml. III, 2, 411. Ant. II, 6, 43 etc. “to l. one's breath:” Err. IV, 2, 30. Ant. II, 2, 235. “to l. hopes:” Merch. II, 2, 198. H6A IV, 5, 25. Mcb. IV, 3, 24. to l. one's self: “loan oft --s both itself and friend,” Hml. I, 3, 76. == to be no longer what one has been, to forfeit one's own nature, to perish: “if I keep them, I needs must l. myself,” Gent. II, 6, 20. “we l. ourselves to keep our oaths,” LLL IV, 3, 362. “or l. myself in dotage,” Ant. I, 2, 121. “if I l. mine honour, I l. myself,” III, 4, 23.
3) to be deprived of, to be separated from: “he hath lost his fellows,” Tp. I, 2, 416. “I have played the sheep in --ing him,” Gent. I, 1, 73. “carouse together like friends long lost,” Ant. IV, 12, 13. In a moral sense == to alienate, to act so as to forfeit the favour of: “Julia I l. and Valentine I l.” Gent. II, 6, 19. “neglect me, l. me,” Mids. II, 1, 206. “lost their hearts,” R2 II, 1, 247. “the least of which haunting a noble man --th men's hearts,” H4A III, 1, 187. “l. not so noble a friend on vain suppose,” Tit. I, 440. “he that is approved in this offence, shall l. me,” Oth. II, 3, 213. “the way to l. him,” Ant. I, 3, 10.
4) to have the worst, to be the contrary to the gainer at a game, in a battle, or what is like it; absol.: “a captive victor that hath lost in gain,” Lucr. 730. “they have the wisdom by their wit to lose,” Merch. II, 9, 81. “if he l.” III, 2, 44. “thou shalt not l. by it,” Shr. Ind. 2, 101. John III, 1, 332. John III, 1, 332 R2 II, 2, 81. H6A IV, 3, 31. H6B III, 1, 183. H6C I, 1, 113. Ant. II, 3, 26. Lr. V, 2, 6. 3, 15. Cymb. II, 3, 4. “I follow thus a --ing suit against him,” Merch. IV, 1, 62 (a suit in which the loss is certain). “the first bringer of unwelcome news hath but a --ing office,” H4B I, 1, 101. “I shall have glory by this --ing day,” Caes. V, 5, 36. Trans.: Tp. I, 1, 54. Meas. I, 2, 196. All's I, 1, 137. III, 5, 91. R3 IV, 4, 538. Cor. I, 7, 4. Rom. III, 2, 12. Caes. V, 1, 98. Mcb. I, 1, 4. Hml. V, 2, 219. Lr. V, 1, 18. Ant. IV, 12, 9. Cymb. I, 6, 18 etc. With to: “rather l. her to an African,” Tp. II, 1, 125. “those lands lost by his father to our most valiant brother,” Hml. I, 2, 24.
5) to wander from, to miss: “l. my way among the thorns and dangers of this world,” John IV, 3, 140. Cor. V, 1, 60. Ant. III, 11, 4. “that which all the Parthian darts, though enemy, lost aim,” IV, 14, 71.
6) refl. to wander at random, to go astray: “so I, in quest of them, l. myself,” Err. I, 2, 40. “to l. itself in a fog,” Cor. II, 3, 34. “I have lost myself, I am not here,” Rom. I, 1, 203. lost == bewildered: “like one lost in a thorny wood,” H6C III, 2, 174. “lost in the labyrinth of thy fury,” Troil. II, 3, 1. “be not lost so poorly in your thoughts,” Mcb. II, 2, 71. “can you advise me? I am lost in it,” Hml. IV, 7, 55.
7) not to enjoy: “our doubts make us l. the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt,” Meas. I, 4, 78. “that her ear l. nothing of the false sweet bait,” Ado III, 1, 32. “you have lost much good sport,” As I, 2, 105. Alls III, 5, 2. Tw. II, 5, 2. Wint. V, 2, 46. H6B IV, 10, 66. H8 I, 1, 13. Mcb. I, 5, 13.
8) to throw away, not to profit by, to waste: “my pains . . . all lost,” Tp. IV, 190. All's V, 1, 24. “we shall l. our time,” Tp. IV, 248. Gent. I, 1, 67. All's V, 3, 39. All's V, 3, 39 if lost (love), Gent. I, 1, 33. “you'll l. the tide,” II, 3, 39. II, 3, 39 “l. thy voyage,” II, 3, 39 “shall I not l. my suit?” Wiv. I, 4, 153. “I l. not my labour,” II, 1, 247. Meas. V, 433. Err. V, 97. Mcb. V, 8, 8. “the ploughman lost his sweat,” Mids. II, 1, 94. “I shall l. the grounds I work upon,” All's III, 7, 3. “that breath wilt thou l.” R2 II, 1, 30. “to l. thy youth in peace,” H6B V, 2, 46. “my shoot is lost,” H6C III, 1, 7. “l. no hour,” IV, 1, 148. “the virtues which our divines l. by them,” Cor. II, 3, 64 (by == on). “l. your voice,” Hml. I, 2, 45. “'tis a lost fear,” Oth. V, 2, 269 (groundless, vain). “so find we profit by --ing of our prayers,” Ant. II, 1, 8. “the horse were merely lost,” III, 7, 9.
9) to suffer to vanish from the mind, to forget: “the lesson is but plain, and once made perfect, never lost again,” Ven. 408. “--ing her woes in shows of discontent,” Lucr. 1580. “l. an oath, to win a paradise,” LLL IV, 3, 73. “let us once l. our oaths,” LLL IV, 3, 73 “my mind did l. it,” Mids. I, 1, 114. “l. and neglect the creeping hours of time,” As II, 7, 112. “hear what I say, and then go home and l. me,” H8 II, 1, 57. “what to ourselves in passion we propose, the passion ending, doth the purpose l.” Hml. III, 2, 205 (forget in v. 202). Perhaps also in Gent. II, 1, 23 and Mids. II, 1, 206. “I will go l. myself and wander up and down to view the city” Err. I, 2, 30 (i. e. I will try to forget my business and my cares; Germ. ich will mich zerstreuen).
10) to cause to be lost, to cause the loss of: “her eyes had lost her tongue,” Tw. II, 2, 21. “it shall l. thee nothing,” Lr. I, 2, 125 (perhaps also in H4A III, 1, 187; see sub 3). Hence == to ruin: “indent with fears, when they have lost and forfeited themselves,” H4A I, 3, 88. “a woman lost among ye,” H8 III, 1, 107 (== ruined by you). “though his bark cannot be lost,” Mcb. I, 3, 24. “not to have it hath lost me in your liking,” Lr. I, 1, 236. “the foul opinion you had of her pure honour gains or --s your sword or mine,” Cymb. II, 4, 59. lost == doomed to ruin: “thou wert but a lost monster,” Tp. IV, 203. “yourself and me cry lost,” Wint. I, 2, 411. “the languishings whereof the king is rendered lost,” All's I, 3, 236. == dead, gone: “lament till I am lost,” Wint. V, 3, 135. “since the cardinal fell, that title's lost,” H8 IV, 1, 96.
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