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Loss, 1) privation, the ceasing of possession; absol.: “all --es are restored,” Sonn. 30, 14. “a l. in love that touches me,” 42, 4. “increasing store with l. and l. with store,” 64, 8. Tp. II, 1, 123. Tp. II, 1, 123 IV, 210. V, 140. V, 140 Merch. III, 1, 96. III, 3, 32. Wint. II, 1, 169. R2 III, 2, 94. R2 III, 2, 94 H5 III, 6, 134. H6A I, 1, 59. IV, 3, 49. IV, 3, 49 H6C III, 2, 73. Troil. IV, 4, 10. Rom. III, 5, 75. Rom. III, 5, 75 Rom. III, 5, 75 Caes. IV, 3, 151. Caes. IV, 3, 151 Used of the slaughter made in battle: John II, 307. H5 IV, 8, 115. to have a l. or “--es:” Ado IV, 2, 87. Merch. III, 1, 45. John III, 4, 99. R3 II, 2, 78. IV, 4, 307. H8 I, 3, 37. “we are enow to do our country l.” H5 IV, 3, 21 (== to cause a great detriment to her). Preceded by the Saxon genit. a) in an obj. sense: “my father's l.” Tp. I, 2, 487. “his sweet life's l.” John IV, 3, 106. H4B I, 1, 121. H6B III, 1, 216. R3 I, 3, 193. R3 I, 3, 193 Tit. IV, 4, 31. b) in a subj. sense: “this war's l.” John II, 348. “the l. of mine,” Rom. III, 1, 196 (== my loss). my l. == a) the l. which I have suffered: Tp. II, 1, 3. Wiv. IV, 6, 5. Meas. IV, 4, 27. Merch. III, 1, 21. Merch. III, 1, 21 IV, 1, 27. Shr. V, 2, 113. All's IV, 3, 77. H5 III, 6, 137. H6A II, 1, 53. H6C II, 3, 26. IV, 6, 15. V, 4, 1. R3 IV, 4, 66. R3 IV, 4, 66 Tim. V, 1, 202. Cymb. I, 1, 120. b) the loss suffered in me: “thus find I by their l. for Valentine myself,” Gent. II, 6, 21. “your l. is great, no l. is known in me,” H6A IV, 5, 22. Of following, always objectively: “l. of thee,” Sonn. 90, 14; cf. Pilgr. 94; H6C II, 5, 119; Oth. III, 4, 102. I hazarded the l. of whom I “loved,” Err. I, 1, 132. “by the l. of a beard,” Ado III, 2, 49. All's I, 1, 138. III, 6, 59. Wint. V, 2, 81. John III, 1, 206. R2 IV, 196. H4A V, 4, 78. H6A I, 1, 63. V, 4, 112. H6C I, 1, 270. IV, 6, 15. R3 I, 3, 7. R3 I, 3, 7 Troil. IV, 1, 60. Tit. II, 4, 29. Cymb. V, 5, 70. Per. III Prol. 10. V, 1, 29. Two genitives: “whose l. of his queen,” Wint. IV, 2, 26; cf. H6C IV, 6, 15.
2) the having the worst, failure, defeat, as at gaming: “the most patient man in l.” Cymb. II, 3, 2. cf. II, 4, 49. With of: “l. of some battle,” H6C IV, 4, 4. “not what is dangerous present, but the l. of what is past,” Cor. III, 2, 71 (that which has already been done amiss). With a genitive: “soul, live thou upon thy servant's l.” Sonn. 146, 9 (at the expense, to the detriment of thy servant, viz the body). “for their advantage and your highness' l.” R2 I, 4, 41. “wherefore grieve I at an kour's l.?” H6B III, 2, 381 (at the mischance of a fleeting moment). With a poss. pron.: “repeat and history his l. to new remembrance,” H4B IV, 1, 203. “their gain and l.” R3 II, 4, 59 (good and bad fortune).
Hence == disparagement, discomfiture, misfortune, overthrow, ruin: “the hopeless merchant of this l.” Lucr. 1660 (== wreck). “though thou repent, yet I have still the l.” Sonn. 34, 10. “one silly cross wrought all my l.” Pilgr. 258. “no l. shall touch her by my company,” Meas. III, 1, 181. “in the l. that may happen,” All's I, 3, 125. “that's the l. of men, though it be the getting of children,” III, 2, 44. “very envy and the tongue of l. cried fame and honour on him,” Tw. V, 61.*“why should that gentleman give then such instances of l.?” H4B I, 1, 56. “we all that are engaged to this l.” H4B I, 1, 56 “that you shall read in your own --es,” H5 II, 4, 139. “tidings were brought me of your l.” H6C II, 1, 110. “our hap is l.” II, 3, 9. “we might recover all our l. again,” V, 2, 30. “pitying my father's l. . . . restored me to my honours,” H8 II, 1, 113. “success or l.” Troil. I, 3, 183. “and l. assume all reason,” V, 2, 145. “what l. your honour may sustain,” Hml. I, 3, 29. “to give --es their remedies,” Lr. II, 2, 177. “his life with thine stand in assured l.” III, 6, 102. “the Turkish l.” Oth. II, 1, 32. “rather makes choice of l. than gain which darkens him,” Ant. III, 1, 23. “beguiled me to the very heart of l.” IV, 12, 29. “your l. is as yourself, great,” V, 2, 101. “thou bid'st me to my l.” Cymb. III, 5, 163.
3) the state of not enjoying, not profiting by sth., waste: “but for l. of Nestor's golden words,” Lucr. 1420. “l. of time,” Gent. I, 3, 19. Troil. II, 2, 4. Cor. III, 1, 285.
4) the state of being cast off and discarded: “poor thing, condemned to l.” Wint. II, 3, 192. “that for thy mother's fault art thus exposed to l. and what may follow,” III, 3, 51. “he counsels a divorce, a l. of her that like a jewel has hung twenty years about his neck,” H8 II, 2, 31.
5) the state of being at fault, of having lost the trace and scent of the game: “he cried upon it at the merest l.” Shr. Ind. 1, 23 (cf. the modern phrase to be at a l.). Hence == embarrassment: “I subscribe not that, nor any other, but in the l. of question,” Meas. II, 4, 90 (as no better arguments present themselves to my mind, to make the point clear).
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