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Love, vb. 1) to be tenderly affected towards a person; absol. == to be in love: “she cannot choose but l.” Ven. 79. Ven. 79 Ven. 79 Ven. 79 Gent. I, 1, 9. IV, 3, 18 etc. etc. Gerund: “tell my --ing tale,” Lucr. 480 (the tale of my love). R3 IV, 4, 359. “most friendship is feigning, most --ing mere folly,” As II, 7, 181. “thy --ing voyage is but for two months victualled,” V, 4, 197. Unintelligible passage: “who, as others do, --s for his own ends, not for you,” Mcb. III, 5, 13 (Halliwell lives; perhaps looks).
Partic. --ing, adjectively, == kind, affectionate, friendly: “there reigns love and all love's --ing parts,” Sonn. 31, 3. “did us but --ing wrong,” Tp. I, 2, 151. “my --ing Proteus,” Gent. I, 1, 1. II, 7, 7. to tear such --ing “words,” I, 2, 105. “my --ing lord,” LLL I, 1, 28. II, 37. “in --ing visitation,” Merch. IV, 1, 153 (not for business). “three or four --ing lords have put themselves into voluntary exile with him,” As I, 1, 106. “my --ing subjects,” John II, 203. “most --ing liege,” R2 I, 1, 21. “a --ing farewell,” I, 3, 51. “by a lower but --ing likelihood,” H5 V Chor. H5 V Chor. “your --ing nephew now is come,” H6A II, 5, 33. “my friends and --ing countrymen,” III, 1, 137. “O --ing uncle,” III, 1, 137 H6B III, 2, 268. H6B III, 2, 268 H6C II, 1, 47. H6C II, 1, 47 III, 2, 59. IV, 1, 53. IV, 8, 19. V, 7, 32. R3 III, 1, 96. III, 5, 54. V, 3, 6 (Qq gracious). H8 II, 1, 92. Troil. IV, 4, 77 (M. Edd. they 're --ing; Q om.; F1 their --ing). IV, 5, 155. Rom. I, 1, 198 (--ing tears; the spurious Q1 and M. Edd. “lovers' tears).” Caes. III, 1, 127. Lr. I, 1, 43. V, 1, 20. With to: “so --ing to my mother,” Hml. I, 2, 140.
Trans.: Ven. 77. Ven. 77 Ven. 77 Ven. 77 Tp. I, 1, 22. I, 2, 69. I, 2, 69 II, 1, 294. II, 2, 50. III, 1, 67. III, 1, 67 III, 3, 93. IV, 48 etc. etc. Peculiar expressions: “fortune l. you,” Lr. V, 1, 46 (cf. Cor. I, 5, 21). “--ing his own pride and purposes,” Oth. I, 1, 12. “for wisdom's sake, a word that all men love, or for love's sake, a word that --s all men,” LLL IV, 3, 358 (according to commentators, == is pleasing to all men; which is very improbable. Strained and obscure as the expression has become by the antithesis, it can only mean: a word for a thing that affects all men).
2) to like, to be pleased with: “hunting he --d,” Ven. 4. “his rider --d not speed,” Sonn. 50, 8. “'tis the lesser sin that mine eye --s it,” 114, 14. “whose shadow the dismissed bachelor --s,” Tp. IV, 67. “some book I l.” Gent. I, 1, 20. “I l. crusts,” III, 1, 346. Wiv. I, 1, 302. Err. II, 2, 8. Ado II, 1, 283. Merch. IV, 1, 47. As IV, 1, 4. Shr. Ind. 2, 51. IV, 1, 167. All's IV, 5, 50. John V, 4, 50. H6B II, 1, 101. Troil. I, 2, 146. Cor. II, 1, 52. Caes. V, 1, 28. Mcb. I, 6, 5 “(his --d mansionry).” Hml. II, 2, 467 etc. With an inf.: “I l. to hear her speak,” Sonn. 130, 9. “age in love --s not to have years told,” 138, 12. “a villain I do not l. to look on,” Tp. I, 2, 310. “I l. to walk by the Countergate,” Wiv. III, 3, 84. LLL I, 1, 176. As II, 1, 67. II, 5, 2. II, 5, 2 Shr. IV, 3, 24. All's III, 4, 28. H6B II, 1, 11. Tim. I, 1, 232. Caes. II, 1, 203 etc.
3) to love each other, to be tenderly attached to each other: “never two ladies --d as they do,” As I, 1, 117. “they --d well when they were alive,” H6B IV, 7, 139. “l. and be friends,” Caes. IV, 3, 131. “you and I have --d,” Ant. I, 3, 88. “better might we have --d,” III, 2, 32 (cf. Embrace, Greet, Hug, Kiss, Know, Kill, Look, See etc.).
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