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Lay, vb. (impf. and partic. laid) 1) to place along, to make to lie: “--d by his side his brand,” Sonn. 154, 2. “whom I can l. to bed for ever,” Tp. II, 1, 284; cf. Ant. II, 2, 232. “and l. my arms before the legs of this sweet lass,” LLL V, 2, 558. “it should here be --d,” Wint. III, 3, 44. H5 II, 3, 24. IV, 1, 284. Rom. IV, 3, 30. Mcb. II, 2, 12. Hml. IV, 5, 69. V, 1, 261. Lr. III, 4, 54. III, 6, 97. Oth. IV, 2, 105. IV, 3, 22. V, 2, 237. V, 2, 59. Per. III, 1, 68. Used of a foundation: “--d great bases for eternity,” Sonn. 125, 3; “tyranny, l. thou thy basis sure,” Mcb. IV, 3, 32. Metaphorically: “and l. a sentence, which as a grise or step may help these lovers into your favour,” Oth. I, 3, 199. “l. him down,” Cymb. IV, 2, 282. to l. low == to bury: “I would that I were low --d in my grave,” John II, 164. “I saw her --d low in her kindred's vault,” Rom. V, 1, 20. And to l., absolutely, == to place in the earth, to bury: “in sad cypress let me be --d,” Tw. II, 4, 53. “l. me where true lover never find my grave,” Tw. II, 4, 53 “I desire to l. my bones there,” Wint. IV, 2, 6. “l. me where no priest shovels in dust,” IV, 4, 468. “we'll l. before this town our royal bones,” John II, 41. “therein --d,” R2 III, 3, 168. “l. these bones in an unworthy urn,” H5 I, 2, 228. “I'll blast his harvest, if your head were --d,” H6C V, 7, 21. “to l. his weary bones among ye,” H8 IV, 2, 22. “to l. them by their brethren,” Tit. I, 89. “not in a grave, to l. one in,” Rom. II, 3, 84. “l. me with Juliet,” V, 3, 73. “scarce hold the --ing in,” Hml. V, 1, 182. “where shall's l. him?” Cymb. IV, 2, 233. to l. forth, and to l. out == to dress in graveclothes and place in a decent posture: “embalm me, then l. me forth,” H8 IV, 2, 171. “she that --s thee out,” Troil. II, 3, 34.
Refl. == to lie down: “who --d him down,” As II, 7, 15. “bids you l. you down,” H4A III, 1, 214. “I l. me down to breathe,” H6C II, 3, 2. “l. thee all along,” Rom. V, 3, 3. “l. thee down and roar,” Oth. V, 2, 198.
2) to beat down, to turn upside down, to prostrate: “lay this Angiers even with the ground,” John II, 399. “who even with the earth shall l. your towers,” H6A IV, 2, 13. “mischance hath --d me on the ground,” H6C III, 3, 9. “when I have --d Athens on a heap,” Tim. IV, 3, 101. “to l. flat:” Cor. III, 1, 198. Cor. III, 1, 198 Cymb. I, 4, 23. to l. down: “a speeding trick to l. down ladies,” H8 I, 3, 40. to l. up == to destroy: “there were too cousins --d up,” As I, 3, 7; cf. Layer-up.
3) to cause to sink, to prevent from rising: “l. the dust,” Gent. II, 3, 35. R2 III, 3, 43. Lr. IV, 6, 201. “to l. this wind,” Troil. IV, 4, 55. Of spirits, == to exorcise: “till she had --d it,” Rom. II, 1, 26 (quibbling); cf. unlaid in Cymb. IV, 2, 278.
4) to spread and set in order: “the carpets --d,” Shr. IV, 1, 52. “have you --d fair the bed?” H6B III, 2, 11. With up: “a wet cloak ill --d up,” H4B V, 1, 95. With forth: “l. forth the gown,” Shr. IV, 3, 62.
5) to put in confinement: “--d in some dark room,” Err. IV, 4, 97. “they have --d me here in hideous darkness,” Tw. IV, 2, 34. “Clarence whom I have --d in darkness,” R3 I, 3, 327 (Ff cast). “I'll l. ye all by the heels,” H8 V, 4, 83 (i. e. in the stocks).
6) to place, to put in general: “roses that on lawn we l.” Lucr. 258. “other bars he --s before me,” Wiv. III, 4, 7. “have I --d my brain in the sun,” V, 5, 143. l. it (Carduus Benedictus) “to your heart,” Ado III, 4, 74. “never l. thy hand upon thy sword,” V, 1, 54; R2 I, 3, 179; Hml. I, 5, 158. “l. his wreathed arms athwart his bosom,” LLL IV, 3, 135. “the juice of it on sleeping eye-lids --d,” Mids. II, 1, 170. III, 2, 89. “how the young folks l. their heads together,” Shr. I, 2, 139; H6B III, 1, 165; IV, 8, 60. “more rags to l. on thee,” Wint. IV, 3, 58. “from forth thy reach he would have --d thy shame,” R2 II, 1, 106. “at his feet to l. my arms and power,” III, 3, 39; H4B III, 1, 63; Rom. II, 2, 147; Hml. II, 2, 31; Ant. III, 13, 76. “l. thine ear close to the ground,” H4A II, 2, 33. “that I may l. my head in thy lap,” III, 1, 230; H4B V, 3, 110. “--d gifts before him,” H4A IV, 3, 71. “l. him in his father's arms,” H6A IV, 7, 29. l. them (my fingers) “gently on thy side,” V, 3, 49; H6B III, 2, 46; H8 III, 2, 115; Troil. I, 3, 240; Caes. I, 2, 243 “(off);” Mcb. I, 3, 44; Oth. II, 1, 223. “is all my armour --d into my tent?” R3 V, 3, 51. “--ing manors on 'em,” H8 I, 1, 84. “--d any scruple in your way,” II, 4, 150. “this so dishonoured rub, --d falsely in the plain way of his merit,” Cor. III, 1, 60. “where we l. our scene,” Cor. III, 1, 60. “l. hand on heart, advise,” III, 5, 192. “I had --d wormwood to my dug,” I, 3, 26. “--s her full mess before you,” Tim. IV, 3, 424. “l. it in the praetor's chair,” Caes. I, 3, 143. “your grace hath --d the odds o' the weaker side,” Hml. V, 2, 272. “--d his leg over my thigh,” Oth. III, 3, 424. “the poor last kiss I l. upon thy lips,” Ant. IV, 15, 21; cf. John II, 19. “we must l. his head to the east,” Cymb. IV, 2, 255. Peculiar phrases: “l. her a-hold,” Tp. I, 1, 52 (make the ship keep clear of the land); cf. “l. her off,” Tp. I, 1, 52 “would fain l. knife aboard,” Rom. II, 4, 214 (== board); and hence: “--ing the prize aboard,” H6B IV, 1, 25 (== boarding it). “thou --est in every gash the knife that made it,” Troil. I, 1, 62. “then I will l. the serving creature's dagger on your pate,” Rom. IV, 5, 119. Metaphorically: “l. your heart at his dispose,” John I, 263. l. it to thy heart (== consider it) Mcb. I, 5, 14. “l. not that flattering unction to your soul,” Hml. III, 4, 145. “l. comforts to your bosom,” Lr. II, 1, 128. Refl.: “I will l. myself in hazard,” Meas. IV, 2, 165.
Joined with adverbs and adjectives: to l. apart == to put off, to renounce: “thy godhead --d apart,” As IV, 3, 44. “l. apart the borrowed glories,” H5 II, 4, 78. “to l. apart their particular functions,” III, 7, 41. “to l. his gay comparisons apart,” Ant. III, 13, 26. to l. aside == to put off, to discontinue, to renounce: “l. aside the thoughts of Sicilia,” Wint. IV, 2, 58. “to l. aside the sword,” John I, 12. “to l. aside life-harming heaviness,” R2 II, 2, 3. H4B I, 2, 99. H6C II, 2, 10. III, 3, 229. Cor. I, 1, 201. I, 3, 75. to l. by == a) to put at one's side: “Cupid --d by his brand,” Sonn. 153, 1. b) to put apart for a certain use: “l. it by,” Wint. IV, 4, 277. Wint. IV, 4, 277 “and l. it by,” Tit. IV, 1, 104. “l. by these,” Oth. IV, 3, 48. c) to take off, to put off, to set apart: “l. by all nicety,” Meas. II, 4, 162. “to l. my reverence by,” Ado V, 1, 64. “l. these glozes by,” LLL IV, 3, 370. “l. nice manners by,” All's V, 1, 15. “let them l. by their helmets,” R2 I, 3, 119. got with swearing 'l. by', H4A I, 2, 40 (i. e. throw off your load; according to others a nautical term, == to stop). “I have --d by my majesty,” H5 I, 2, 276. “his ceremonies --d by,” IV, 1, 109. “we l. by our appertainments,” Troil. II, 3, 86. “--ing by that nothing-gift of differing multitudes,” Cymb. III, 6, 85. to l. down == a) to place on the ground: “--ing them down,” Gent. I, 2, 135. b) to renounce, to quit, to give up: “l. down thy arms,” John II, 154. John II, 154 V, 1, 24. V, 2, 126. H6B IV, 2, 131. “you must l. down the treasures of your body to this supposed,” Meas. II, 4, 96. “I dare my life l. down,” Wint. II, 1, 130. III, 2, 83. “l. down your head,” H6B IV, 1, 16. to l. to == to ply, to apply eagerly: “l. to your fingers,” Tp. IV, 251. to l. up == to reposit, to store: “the gold is --d up safe at the Centaur,” Err. II, 2, 1. “all comfort heaven ever --d up to make parents happy,” H8 V, 5, 8. to l. bare == to uncover: “l. bare your bosom,” Merch. IV, 1, 252. to l. naked, in the same sense: R3 I, 2, 178. to l. open == to discover, to show, to display: Lucr. 747. Lucr. 747 Wiv. II, 2, 191. Err. III, 2, 34. Wint. III, 2, 19. John IV, 3, 38. H4A II, 3, 34. R3 III, 7, 15. Cymb. III, 2, 29.
Followed by prepositions; to l. before == to exhibit, to present to view: “those fell mischiefs our reasons --d before him,” H8 V, 1, 50. “wherefore had you not fully --d my state before me,” Tim. II, 2, 134. “I brought in my accounts, --d them before you,” Tim. II, 2, 134 to l. to the charge of == to charge with, to impute: Ado V, 1, 228. As III, 2, 370. Wint. II, 3, 96 “(might we l. the old proverb to your charge).” V, 1, 195. John I, 256. R2 I, 1, 84. H6A III, 1, 4. H6B III, 1, 134. R3 I, 3, 326. Lr. I, 2, 138. to l. to a person's answer, and to a p. in the same sense: “this is not --d to thy answer,” Wint. III, 2, 200. “nor is't directly --d to thee,” Wint. III, 2, 200 “it will be --d to us,” Hml. IV, 1, 17. “--ing defects of judgment to me,” Ant. II, 2, 55. to l. to gage or to pawn == to pawn: “pawned honest looks, but --d no words to gage,” Lucr. 1351. “you should l. my countenance to pawn,” Wiv. II, 2, 5. III, 1, 112. to l. upon or on == to bestow, to confer, to charge, to impose, to inflict: “l. bolts enough upon him,” Meas. V, 350. “this imposition which my love --s upon you,” Merch. III, 4, 35. “l. all the weight you can upon my patience,” H8 V, 3, 66. “--est thou thy leaden mace upon my boy,” Caes. IV, 3, 268. “these hard conditions as this time is like to l. upon us,” I, 2, 175. “for the command, I'll l. it upon you,” Oth. II, 1, 272. “a joint burden --d upon us all,” H4B V, 2, 55. “to whom as great a charge as little honour he meant to l. upon,” H8 I, 1, 78. “he has much worthy blame --d upon him,” All's IV, 3, 7; Mcb. III, 4, 44; IV, 3, 124; Lr. V, 3, 254. Oth. IV, 2, 46. “l. breath so bitter on your bitter foe,” Mids. III, 2, 44. “the canon of the law is --d on him,” John II, 180. “the care on thee I l.” Per. I, 2, 119. “l. on me this cross,” Sonn. 42, 12. “if you seek to l. on me a cruelty,” Ant. V, 2, 129. “the curse my noble father --d on thee,” R3 I, 3, 174. “have --d disgraces on my head,” H6B III, 1, 162. “to l. any of my evils on you,” Tw. II, 1, 7. “l. the fault on me,” H6A II, 1, 57; Cor. II, 3, 234; Cor. II, 3, 234 “such griefs as you l. upon yourself,” Per. I, 2, 66. “--d their guilt upon my guiltless shoulders,” R3 I, 2, 98. “to l. a heavy and unequal hand upon our honours,” H4B IV, 1, 102. “the imputation --d on him,” Hml. V, 2, 149. “indignities you --d upon me,” H4B V, 2, 69. “wilt l. the leaven on all proper men,” Cymb. III, 4, 64. “the most loathed life that age can l. on nature,” Meas. III, 1, 131. “l. their murders on your neck,” Oth. V, 2, 170. “what penance your invention can l. upon my sin,” Ado V, 1, 283. “shall I l. perjury upon my soul?” Merch. IV, 1, 229. “what a scourge is --d upon your hate,” Rom. V, 3, 292. “if thou accountest it shame, l. it on me,” Shr. IV, 3, 183. “--d the sentence of banishment on yon man,” R2 III, 3, 134. “the sins of the father are to be --d upon the children,” Merch. III, 5, 2. H5 IV, 1, 249. “--ing these sullies on my son,” Hml. II, 1, 39. “could not have --d such terms upon his callat,” Oth. IV, 2, 121. “a torment to l. upon the damned,” Tp. I, 2, 290. “the wrong that thy unkindness --s upon my heart,” Sonn. 139, 2. “that still I l. upon my mother's head,” John I, 76. “l. on that shall make your shoulders crack,” II, 146. “all else this lord can l. upon my credit,” H8 III, 2, 265. In a good, or at least indifferent sense: “he hath --d courtesies upon me,” Ant. II, 2, 157. “on him I l. what you would l. on me,” R3 III, 7, 171 (i. e. the royal dignity). to l. my duty on your hand (viz a kiss) Ant. III, 13, 81. “emblems --d nobly on her,” H8 IV, 1, 90. “the duke will l. upon him all the honour,” All's III, 2, 74; R3 I, 3, 97; Caes. IV, 1, 19. “upon thy cheek l. I this zealous kiss,” John II, 19; cf. Ant. IV, 15, 21. “we l. our best love and credence upon thy promising fortune,” All's III, 3, 2. “--d my knighthood on my shoulder,” R2 I, 1, 79. “l. negligent and loose regard upon him,” Troil. III, 3, 41. “--d good'scuse upon your ecstasy,” Oth. IV, 1, 80. “l. a more noble thought upon mine honour,” All's V, 3, 180. “to l. so dear a trust on any soul,” H4A IV, 1, 34. “I will l. trust upon thee,” Lr. III, 5, 25. -- To l. violent hands on a person's life == to kill or murder a p.: H6B III, 2, 138. H6B III, 2, 138 Tit. III, 2, 22. Tit. III, 2, 22 to l. hands on == to use violence to, to seize: Ado III, 3, 58. As I, 1, 58. Shr. V, 1, 39. H6B I, 4, 44. H6C III, 1, 26. R3 I, 4, 196. Cor. III, 1, 222. Tit. V, 2, 159. Cymb. V, 3, 91. “to l. hand:” Lr. IV, 6, 192. to l. hold on == to seize: Meas. V, 364. Err. V, 91. Shr. V, 1, 91. Troil. V, 3, 59. Oth. I, 2, 80. to l. hold of (cf. Of): Cor. III, 1, 212. Rom. I, 5, 118.
7) to set, to place for the purpose of entrapping: “a bait on purpose --d,” Sonn. 129, 8. “the bait that we l. for it,” Ado III, 1, 33. “you must l. lime to tangle her desires,” Gent. III, 2, 68. “thou --dst a trap to take my life,” H6A III, 1, 22; H8 V, 1, 143. “l. an ambush for your life,” R2 I, 1, 137. “all the country is --d for me,” H6B IV, 10, 4 (== beset, filled with traps). Absol.: “I'll cheer up my discontented troops, and l. for hearts,” Tim. III, 5, 115 (strive to entrap, to captivate hearts).
8) to plan, to project, to contrive: “this plot of death when sadly she had --d,” Lucr. 1212; Wiv. III, 2, 39; III, 3, 202; John III, 4, 146; R2 IV, 333; H4A II, 1, 57; II, 3, 18; H6A II, 3, 4; R3 I, 1, 32. “to l. a complot,” Tit. V, 2, 147. “l. new platforms,” H6A II, 1, 77. “this is of purpose --d by some that hate me,” H8 V, 2, 14. “malice and lucre in them have --d this woe here,” Cymb. IV, 2, 325. With down, == to compute; to devise: “in better shape than I can l. it down in likelihood,” Ado IV, 1, 238. H4A I, 2, 168. H4B I, 3, 35. H5 I, 2, 137.
9) to institute, to apply, to bring to bear: “to l. a claim,” Lucr. 1794; Err. III, 2, 84; 86; 89; 144; As V, 1, 7; John I, 9; 72; R2 II, 3, 135; H6B II, 2, 40; H6C I, 1, 152. “to l. siege to sth.:” Wiv. II, 2, 243; Mids. I, 1, 142; H6B III, 3, 22; Tim. IV, 3, 7. “to l. down a siege,” All's III, 7, 18.
10) to stake, to wage; absol. with on: “--ing on my duty,” Shr. V, 2, 129. “he hath --d on twelve for nine,” Hml. V, 2, 174. Trans.: “I'll l. my head to any goodman's hat,” LLL I, 1, 310. “and on the wager l. two women,” Merch. III, 5, 85. “--d mine honour on't,” Tw. III, 4, 222 (M. Edd. --d mine honour out). “I dare l. any money,” Tw. III, 4, 222 “I will l. odds,” H4B V, 5, 111. “l. twenty crowns to one,” H5 IV, 1, 242. “I'll l. my life,” Troil. III, 1, 95. Rom. I, 3, 12. Hml. V, 2, 172. Cymb. I, 1, 174. I, 4, 138. “l. down my soul at stake,” Oth. IV, 2, 13. to l. a wager == to bet: “he has --d a great wager on your head,” Hml. V, 2, 105. “the wager you have --d,” Cymb. II, 4, 95.
11) to spread on a surface, to apply as a colour (Germ. auftragen): “beauty needs no pencil, beauty's truth to l.” Sonn. 101, 7. “that was --d on with a trowel,” As I, 2, 112. “whose red and white nature's own cunning hand --d on,” Tw. I, 5, 258. “your sorrow was too sore --d on,” Wint. V, 3, 49 (Leontes' sorrow being compared with the colouring of Hermione's statue). Hence perhaps == to paint, to colour: l. them (your hands) “in gore,” Mids. V, 346 (Thisbe's speech).
12) Joined with certain adverbs or prepositions, == to fall to work with might and main, to do one's best, especially in fighting: “I could l. on like a butcher,” H5 V, 2, 147. “he'll l. about him to-day,” Troil. I, 2, 58. “there's --ing on,” Troil. I, 2, 58 “l. on, Macduff,” Mcb. V, 8, 33. “look you l. home to him,” Hml. III, 4, 1. he --s it on == he does his business well: Tp. III, 2, 160. “my father hath made her mistress of the feast, and she --s it on,” Wint. IV, 3, 43.
13) With out, == to expend: “they will l. out ten doits to see a dead Indian,” Tp. II, 2, 34. “honest fools l. out their wealth on courtsies,” Tim. I, 2, 241. “you l. out too much pains for purchasing but trouble,” Cymb. II, 3, 92. Absol. == to pay for another, to advance money: H4A IV, 2, 5.
14) Intr. == to lie: “and down I --d to list the sadtuned tale,” Compl. 4 (some M. Edd. lay).
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