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Lend (impf. and partic. lent), 1) to give for temporary use on condition of return; abs.: “nature's bequest gives nothing but doth l.” Sonn. 4, 3. “I neither l. nor borrow,” Merch. I, 3, 62. “take or l.” Cymb. III, 6, 24 (perhaps take or leave, i. e. destroy me or let me live; cf. Troil. V, 5, 26). Followed by a dative: “--s to bad debtors,” Lucr. 964. Sonn. 4, 4. Tim. III, 6, 83. By an accus.: “l. articles,” Wiv. IV, 1, 40. “men will l. nothing for God's sake,” Ado V, 1, 321. LLL II, 148. Merch. I, 3, 123. Merch. I, 3, 123 III, 1, 51. R3 II, 2, 93. Tim. III, 1, 44. Lr. I, 4, 133. Cymb. I, 4, 154. By a dat. and accus.: “did you not l. it to Alice,” Wiv. I, 1, 210. “I will not l. thee a penny,” II, 2, 1. Ado II, 1, 287. Merch. I, 3, 130. Merch. I, 3, 130 All's IV, 2, 40. V, 3, 274. V, 3, 274 Tw. III, 4, 379. H4A II, 1, 38. III, 3, 85. V, 3, 41. H4B I, 2, 217. H4B I, 2, 217 H5 IV, 1, 24. H6B III, 1, 77. Cor. I, 4, 6. Tim. III, 6, 111. Oth. III, 4, 52. V, 1, 82. V, 1, 82 With out: “he --s out money gratis,” Merch. I, 3, 45. III, 3, 2. The contrary of to borrow: Ven. 961. Lucr. 1083. Lucr. 1083 Wiv. IV, 1, 40. Ado V, 1, 321. Merch. I, 3, 62.
2) to give in general: “l. me the letter,” Gent. I, 3, 55. “l. me your horn to make one,” LLL V, 1, 71. “I once did l. my body for his wealth,” Merch. V, 249. “l. me thy hand, I'll help thee,” Wint. IV, 3, 71. 72; cf. “l. me your arm,” Per. V, 1, 264 (lean on me). “what a madcap hath heaven lent us here,” John I, 84. “here I l. thee this sharp-pointed sword,” R3 I, 2, 175. “as I will l. you cause,” H8 III, 2, 151. “l. me a looking-glass,” Lr. V, 3, 261.
3) to afford, to grant, to admit to use for another's benefit: “you shall not grieve --ing me this acquaintance,” Lr. IV, 3, 56. “l. him aid,” H6A IV, 4, 23. R3 V, 3, 173. Ant. II, 2, 88. “Lucina lent not me her aid,” Cymb. V, 4, 43. “l. me an arm,” All's I, 2, 73. “to l. me arms and aid,” Ant. II, 2, 88. “l. my best attention,” Cymb. V, 5, 117. “--ing soft audience to my sweet design,” Compl. 278. his (the sun's) “golden beams to you here lent,” R2 I, 3, 146. “--ing your kind commiseration,” Tit. V, 3, 93. “l. thine ear,” Shr. IV, 1, 62 (== listen). R3 IV, 2, 80. Caes. III, 2, 78. “to my unfolding l. your prosperous ear,” Oth. I, 3, 245. “l. ear,” Cor. V, 3, 19. Per. V, 1, 82. “l. favourable ears,” R3 III, 7, 101. “l. no ear,” H4A I, 3, 217. “her arms do l. his neck a sweet embrace,” Ven. 539. “--s embracements unto every stranger,” Ven. 539 “l. to each man enough,” Tim. III, 6, 82. “till time l. friends,” R2 III, 3, 132. “some friendship will it l. you,” Lr. III, 2, 62. “her eyes their gazes l. to every place,” Compl. 26 (mark the difference from glance in Lucr. 1399). “l. thy hand,” Tp. I, 2, 23 (== assist me). H4A II, 4, 2. Tit. III, 1, 188. Caes. III, 1, 297. Per. III, 2, 108. “your gentle hands l. us,” All's V, 3, 340 (i. e. clap, applaud). “l. thy serious hearing,” Hml. I, 5, 5. “the help that thou shalt l. me,” Lucr. 1685. “l. me your knees,” Meas. V, 436. “wilt thou not l. a knee?” Meas. V, 436 “I'll l. you all my life to do you service,” Meas. V, 436 “to l. the world his light,” Ven. 756. Lucr. 190. Lucr. 190 Sonn. 100, 4. Rom. V, 3, 125. Hml. II, 2, 482. they that least l. it (viz love) All's I, 2, 68. “he most narrow measure lent me,” Ant. III, 4, 8. “l. him your kind pains,” Meas. V, 246. “to l. your patience to us,” Hml. IV, 5, 210. “l. redress,” Rom. IV, 5, 146. “--s but weak relief,” Sonn. 34, 11. “his tail cool shadow to his buttock lent,” Ven. 315. “England has lent us good Siward and ten thousand men,” Mcb. IV, 3, 190. “until our stars that frown l. us a smile,” Per. I, 4, 108. “my heart can l. no succour to my head,” I, 1, 171. “you have lent him visitation,” Meas. III, 2, 255. Peculiarly == to cast: “the mild glance that sly Ulysses lent,” Lucr. 1399. “you, but one, can every shadow l.” Sonn. 53, 4 (forming the rhyme in both passages).
4) to bestow on, to endow with, to adorn, to arm with: “desire doth l. her force,” Ven. 29. “if love have lent you twenty thousand tongues,” Ven. 29 “what priceless wealth the heavens had him lent,” Lucr. 17. “thy sword was lent thee all that brood to kill,” Lucr. 17 “--ing him wit,” Lucr. 17 the painter was no god to l. her those (words) Lucr. 17 “she --s them words,” Lucr. 17 that piteous looks to Phrygian shepherds lent, 1502 (i. e. made the shepherds look compassionately). “thy sorrow to my sorrow --eth another power,” Lucr. 17 “he --s thee virtue,” Sonn. 79, 9. “what strained touches rhetoric can l.,” 82, 10. “the pen that to his subject --s not some small glory,” 84, 6. “lest sorrow l. me words,” 140, 3. “that they their passions likewise lent me,” Compl. 199. Gent. II, 6, 42. Gent. II, 6, 42 IV, 2, 42. V, 4, 27. Meas. I, 1, 20. Meas. I, 1, 20 Ado V, 4, 23. LLL IV, 3, 238. All's II, 1, 163. II, 2, 8. V, 3, 48. R2 I, 3, 228. H4A IV, 1, 77. V, 4, 24. H4B I, 1, 112. H4B I, 1, 112 H5 III, 1, 9. H6A I, 1, 87. H6B I, 1, 19. H6B I, 1, 19 Troil. II, 2, 101. Tit. V, 1, 29. Rom. I, 3, 84. II Prol. 13. II, 2, 81. III, 5, 166. Tim. V, 1, 160. Hml. I, 3, 117. III, 4, 166. Ant. V, 1, 23. Cymb. I, 6, 125. Cymb. I, 6, 125.
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